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Hildegard of Bingen, a major twelfth-century mystic and prophet, began having divinely inspired visions at the age of six. These visions continued throughout her life and were the source of highly honored information on healing through a multidimensional approach to the body, mind, emotions, and spirit. Widely accepted by physicians and religious healers of her time, Hilde Hildegard of Bingen, a major twelfth-century mystic and prophet, began having divinely inspired visions at the age of six. These visions continued throughout her life and were the source of highly honored information on healing through a multidimensional approach to the body, mind, emotions, and spirit. Widely accepted by physicians and religious healers of her time, Hildegard’s work was lost over the centuries, and has only recently been reborn through the work of the authors of this book. Hildegard of Bingen’s Medicine is a groundbreaking contribution to medicine and healing. It contains translations of Hildegard text which reflect the high point of medieval, alchemical, and healing science. In addition, these translations are commented upon by authors who have worked clinically with Hildegard’s wisdom for thirty years. Many will find this book to contain profound, long lost spiritual teachings. Hildegard’s deep understanding of nature--trees, herbs, and animals--inspires a new vision of balance and planetary attunement.


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Hildegard of Bingen, a major twelfth-century mystic and prophet, began having divinely inspired visions at the age of six. These visions continued throughout her life and were the source of highly honored information on healing through a multidimensional approach to the body, mind, emotions, and spirit. Widely accepted by physicians and religious healers of her time, Hilde Hildegard of Bingen, a major twelfth-century mystic and prophet, began having divinely inspired visions at the age of six. These visions continued throughout her life and were the source of highly honored information on healing through a multidimensional approach to the body, mind, emotions, and spirit. Widely accepted by physicians and religious healers of her time, Hildegard’s work was lost over the centuries, and has only recently been reborn through the work of the authors of this book. Hildegard of Bingen’s Medicine is a groundbreaking contribution to medicine and healing. It contains translations of Hildegard text which reflect the high point of medieval, alchemical, and healing science. In addition, these translations are commented upon by authors who have worked clinically with Hildegard’s wisdom for thirty years. Many will find this book to contain profound, long lost spiritual teachings. Hildegard’s deep understanding of nature--trees, herbs, and animals--inspires a new vision of balance and planetary attunement.

30 review for Hildegard of Bingen's Medicine

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kate McKinstry

    Whether or not you believe that Hildegard's knowledge of the human body was received from God or not, this book makes a very compelling argument for holistic medicine, including spirituality. The authors of this book continually returned to the idea that humans are made from the same substances as the natural world around us, so it stands to reason that the closer we remain to nature through diet, lifestyle, and healing, the much better our quality of life will be. It is amazing that Hildegard's Whether or not you believe that Hildegard's knowledge of the human body was received from God or not, this book makes a very compelling argument for holistic medicine, including spirituality. The authors of this book continually returned to the idea that humans are made from the same substances as the natural world around us, so it stands to reason that the closer we remain to nature through diet, lifestyle, and healing, the much better our quality of life will be. It is amazing that Hildegard's twelfth century revelations from God can now be backed up by "modern" medicine. This book was a quick yet compelling read for anyone interested in an alternative to the pills and invasive treatments of twenty-first century medicine.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Hildegard was so far ahead of her time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ruth P

    This book is broadly terrible. I got it because I admire Hildegard von Bingen’s music and place in history as a prominent woman - one of the earliest known female composers and a famous mystic and abbess - and because I’m interested in natural and traditional medicine. I took notes, which should help you decide whether or not you’d get anything out of this book: Atheists are isolated from god and probably all dead There are few eye problems that can’t be fixed by tying soggy bread to your eyes ove This book is broadly terrible. I got it because I admire Hildegard von Bingen’s music and place in history as a prominent woman - one of the earliest known female composers and a famous mystic and abbess - and because I’m interested in natural and traditional medicine. I took notes, which should help you decide whether or not you’d get anything out of this book: Atheists are isolated from god and probably all dead There are few eye problems that can’t be fixed by tying soggy bread to your eyes overnight If you can’t hear, put rocks in your ears Disco perforates the liver like Swiss cheese Doesn’t give recipe for flu powder just uses? It’s two chapters later in the heart chapter. Almonds are good for “empty brains” “Diarrhoea egg” is not a good name for anything especially not something you want me to eat Hildegard was obsessed with spelt, hated barley “Though Hildegard is silent on turkey” as if she had access to them but had no opinion. Really casts doubt on the idea that god intended for everyone across the world to all eat a certain way. Strawberries, peaches, plums and leeks are poisonous Hildegard apparently had an opinion on French fries. Loud mouthed inappropriate laughter causes liver disease The moon illuminates the stars. The Fall was mainly about the gallbladder. It used to be we had a shining crystal-clear gallstone of the knowledge of God but it became liquid. Now it overflows into our blood and makes us rude and sad, and we fear god which I always thought we were meant to but here it’s a bad thing. The devil hoarded up black bile in Adam for this reason. I don’t recall any of this in Genesis but perhaps it’s that atheism has rotted my eyes and brain. Fasting gives you the healing fear of god, which must be the good one. Cure jaundice by drinking water that had a diamond in it. The cure for depression is joining a monastery or becoming a hermit. But also spelt porridge. There is sensible stuff like how talking about your worries helps, and how healthy lifestyle and patience help most chronic conditions. And that stress is deadly. Asians always smile just to be polite but it also stops them being mentally ill. You’d think if even one of those three things were true someone else would have noticed. There is a recipe for “nerve cookies” which is just totally normal spiced biscuits. Biscuits and other sweet foods soothe my nerves too but I didn’t need for god to tell me so specifically and I’m surprised Hildegard did. Good description of trauma: “if the human soul feels that its body is menaced, then the heart, the liver and the vessels constrict. Hereby a sort of ‘cloudiness’ will arise from the heart [the blood becomes sour] and envelop the heart in darkness. This is how humans become sad.” This kind of stuff is nestled in amongst all the outright nonsense. It’s not groundbreaking either, just interesting historically to see such an old description of something we wrongly think was only understood recently. Hildegard advises wine for sadness (and as far as I can tell for pretty much everything). I mean, it does work, but... Blue chaceldony physically prevents anger. 100%, it doesn’t help it or make it hard, you literally cannot get angry wearing one? Menstruation prevents gout Eating gold cures everything, even AIDS Quince is the cure for all arthritis. At least this is a tasty cure that can’t kill you Badger fur is good for you (not for the badger though) Arthritis leads to psychosis unless you ruin a sauna by pouring oat milk everywhere They think more people die of cancer than infectious diseases today because there is more cancer. Bloodletting prevents cancer Militant atheists have the most cancer followed by tolerant atheists. Yarrow will help with cancer surgery but for a real cure you need eel gall, ivory and vulture beak. They edited out Hildegard’s whale meat cures for ethical reasons but go ahead and munch on ivory. Coffee is a poison as are spirits (but not when they are tinctures?) but drink as much wine as you can get down you. —— My summary is that to be healthy you have to be a very devout monk or nun who drinks a lot of wine. It comes across like the precursor to those articles in newspapers where someone has turned 100 and they ask them their secret. Their secrets are contradictory and often clearly unhealthy but they aren’t lying that those ways of life got them to 100. Hildegard lived to be old, but I don’t think that means her advice is necessarily worth following. I don’t think this book is very useful but it was interesting both as a look at Hildegard’s beliefs about health and those of the authors. There are a small handful of things I actually aim to put into practise (not counting constantly eating spelt, which I was already a fan of) but I had much higher hopes.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brynne

    This book had a lot of great information, but because of the dismissal of mental illnesses, insistence on fasting (if you do it for religious purposes, that’s cool, but it can actually be damaging to your health if done in certain ways), and insistence that Hildegard only discovered what she did because of god, I cannot in good faith give it more than two stars. I can understand viewing her knowledge as divinely inspired, but writing off all of her medical knowledge as “oh she could only do this This book had a lot of great information, but because of the dismissal of mental illnesses, insistence on fasting (if you do it for religious purposes, that’s cool, but it can actually be damaging to your health if done in certain ways), and insistence that Hildegard only discovered what she did because of god, I cannot in good faith give it more than two stars. I can understand viewing her knowledge as divinely inspired, but writing off all of her medical knowledge as “oh she could only do this because Jesus” is dismissive of how smart she was. These references also felt like they were shoehorned in every so often and this seemed more preachy than anything. If you do read this book, I’d suggest skipping chapters 11, 14, and 15. (Chapter 14 isn’t a bad chapter, but it basically boils down to the necessity of detecting cancer early, which doesn’t really need a whole chapter.)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Селина Йонкова

    честно аз прочетох, "медицината на св. хилдегард за жени" клаус шулте-юбинг, но като не можах да я открия тук, отбелязах тази, та де не ми се губят бройките! ;) една добра книга относно алтернативни методи за лечение на някои по- леки болежки, както и добри практики за облекчаване на страданията от сериозните, които да се ползват заедно с лечението. интересен, факт е, че вероятно манастирите са разполагали с някои трудове от източната медицина, защото игуменката хилдеград ползва обозначенията харак честно аз прочетох, "медицината на св. хилдегард за жени" клаус шулте-юбинг, но като не можах да я открия тук, отбелязах тази, та де не ми се губят бройките! ;) една добра книга относно алтернативни методи за лечение на някои по- леки болежки, както и добри практики за облекчаване на страданията от сериозните, които да се ползват заедно с лечението. интересен, факт е, че вероятно манастирите са разполагали с някои трудове от източната медицина, защото игуменката хилдеград ползва обозначенията характерни за там, на храните- топла, студена, влажна, суха... с други думи, още едно доказателство, че средновековието не е било чак толкова мрачно, както го описват в последващите го епохо и жените са имали и възможност за развитие и талант.

  6. 5 out of 5

    S.E. Reid

    A very interesting read if you find Hildegard fascinating, which she clearly was. A mix of practical and impractical medical advice and a must-read for modern herbalists. Hildegard was ahead of her time in so many ways, and this book proves it. That said, I gave it one less star than I intended to for an out-of-nowhere weirdly racist comment, not from Hildegard herself but from one of the writers of the book, in the chapter on Nerves (page 83). I think it was meant as a compliment toward Asian p A very interesting read if you find Hildegard fascinating, which she clearly was. A mix of practical and impractical medical advice and a must-read for modern herbalists. Hildegard was ahead of her time in so many ways, and this book proves it. That said, I gave it one less star than I intended to for an out-of-nowhere weirdly racist comment, not from Hildegard herself but from one of the writers of the book, in the chapter on Nerves (page 83). I think it was meant as a compliment toward Asian people but it was seriously cringe. Just left a weird taste in my mouth and was really unnecessary. The rest of the book was completely fine; why did they have to add that?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This book is more of a cliff notes than the actual writings of Von Bingen. There are odd Bible quotes thrown in here and there that seem irrelevant. The book was poorly written and quickly lost my attention.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Hildegard, an interesting person, but I think the doctors who wrote this book are a trifle nuts to be utilizing medieval medicine... just a thought.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Deb cambria

    I've read a lot of books on health and nutrition. This one is very unique. A little crazy. I'll keep it for reference. I've read a lot of books on health and nutrition. This one is very unique. A little crazy. I'll keep it for reference.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    Fascinating and a topic I'm very interested in. This book left me wanting to read more! Fascinating and a topic I'm very interested in. This book left me wanting to read more!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Heaether

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Harris

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ashling

  16. 5 out of 5

    Diana Stout

  17. 4 out of 5

    Padma

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lydia

  19. 5 out of 5

    Noel Smith

  20. 5 out of 5

    jenny skaggs

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sally Singingtree

  22. 4 out of 5

    Moniza Borges

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bookcase Nationalism

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Fassbender

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Wright

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carole Voss

  28. 5 out of 5

    Leah Berg

  29. 4 out of 5

    Choying

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maxwell Purrington

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