counter create hit Tell Them Who I Am: The Lives of Homeless Women - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Tell Them Who I Am: The Lives of Homeless Women

Availability: Ready to download

"One of the very best things ever written about homeless people in the nation."—Jonathan Kozol.


Compare
Ads Banner

"One of the very best things ever written about homeless people in the nation."—Jonathan Kozol.

30 review for Tell Them Who I Am: The Lives of Homeless Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    In the late 1980's, after being diagnosed with cancer, Elliot Liebow spent a lot of time at homeless shelters for women in the D.C. area, namely The Refuge. He wanted to know how homelessness affected these women's lives (or how their lives affected their homelessness) During his time there, he got to know the women personally, and over time the women he saw frequently went to him to talk about their experiences. He explores all different aspects of their lives: jobs, family, friendships, their In the late 1980's, after being diagnosed with cancer, Elliot Liebow spent a lot of time at homeless shelters for women in the D.C. area, namely The Refuge. He wanted to know how homelessness affected these women's lives (or how their lives affected their homelessness) During his time there, he got to know the women personally, and over time the women he saw frequently went to him to talk about their experiences. He explores all different aspects of their lives: jobs, family, friendships, their daily lives at the shelter, the impression they have the community, and the impression the community has on them. Needless to say (and pardon my french), their lives suck. No one wants to be homeless. If there's one thing that Liebow really wanted to convey, it's that women were not homeless because they had mental health issues or because they had addiction problems or that they were disabled physically or that they didn't have money or a caring family-- There are many women who are mentally or physically ill, with addiction, family problems what have you, who have homes. Whatever excuses we throw out there, those are not the reasons that women are homeless. They are homeless because they don't have a home. And it's shocking to me, that this book was published around the time I was born, so this book is 22 years old, and Liebow suggests that all these women really need, more than anything else, is a support system, and a job with a living wage. Many of these women have jobs. Many of these women have multiple jobs. But they are homeless because they do not have a home. They do not have a home because they cannot afford a home, and they cannot afford a home because they have jobs that don't have a living wage. 22 years and we are still fighting the same fight for a living wage. If that's not something I don't know what is.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This book was for a class my husband took in college. He didn't read it but I did. I wanted to become a pro bono lawyer for homeless men and women and their families. Ten years later I still think that if I were to do anything besides teach it would be this. This book made me think differently. I have picked it up many times to read it again and again.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Hello, This book is informative but quite boring. I didn't have a problem putting it down a few times to do something else instead. It clearly and accurately describes many the lives of homeless woman, which was enlightening but also frustrating for me. I felt like the author had mixed feelings of compassion and sympathy for these woman, but at times didn't at all. This is a good book to read if you're attempting to see different perspectives of life and want to gain the knowledge of the life of Hello, This book is informative but quite boring. I didn't have a problem putting it down a few times to do something else instead. It clearly and accurately describes many the lives of homeless woman, which was enlightening but also frustrating for me. I felt like the author had mixed feelings of compassion and sympathy for these woman, but at times didn't at all. This is a good book to read if you're attempting to see different perspectives of life and want to gain the knowledge of the life of a homeless woman. Smiles, Kimberly

  4. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey Bateman

    Even though this book is now over twenty years old, it still proves useful in the classroom. As an ethnographic study of a women's homeless shelter, it provides a strong introduction to some of the issues that women experiencing homelessness face, issues that sadly still confront women today. There are moments when it's a bit dated, and in class, it's useful to provide students with updated data and information about today's reality. But it's written in very accessible language and continues to Even though this book is now over twenty years old, it still proves useful in the classroom. As an ethnographic study of a women's homeless shelter, it provides a strong introduction to some of the issues that women experiencing homelessness face, issues that sadly still confront women today. There are moments when it's a bit dated, and in class, it's useful to provide students with updated data and information about today's reality. But it's written in very accessible language and continues to provide a thorough and engaging overview to the issue.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I learned alot about the lives of homeless people and the numerous complications they face on a daily basis. Interestingly, many of their problems, like getting a job, seem similar to those of illegal immigrants. I can't imagine getting out of a shelter bed in the morning, being sick with a fever, and going to lay a park bench all day. Book is very eye-opening.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    INCREDIBLE!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jody

    Worthwhile in that we begin to understand why some of the "obvious solutions" may not be solutions after all.

  8. 4 out of 5

    (a)lyss(a)

    "She said there was no way she could get off her part-time job early enough to attend the meetings, and she was told she'd have to choose between the job and the shelter." This is an older book so it doesn't capture the lives of modern homeless women, but it's a good look into the shelter system. I especially like the explanation of contrast between two of the shelters as they're explained how they enforce the rules - by understanding how each shelter sees their role (one as a roof over women's he "She said there was no way she could get off her part-time job early enough to attend the meetings, and she was told she'd have to choose between the job and the shelter." This is an older book so it doesn't capture the lives of modern homeless women, but it's a good look into the shelter system. I especially like the explanation of contrast between two of the shelters as they're explained how they enforce the rules - by understanding how each shelter sees their role (one as a roof over women's heads and the other as a means to stop being homeless) we can better understand why their policies are or aren't working. I think this book serves its purpose to help humanize women experiencing homelessness for the average person. Very few people that don't work with those experiencing homelessness interact with people considered homeless and this book gives a reasonable picture of some of the lives of some of those women. It particularly highlights the dilemma that many women face where they can't get a job while living at a shelter or they're making to much to get any financial support but not enough to pay rent. It's a bit of a dense read that doesn't go really in depth in examining the shelter system, but it's a good look into learning from other peoples experiences.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Oriyah Nitkin

    This was my second ethnography on a homeless population, (the first being Sidewalk, which I thought was fantastic, and that certainly colored my opinion of this book, demoting it by a star. It was interesting, moving, and important. It was potentially outdated (I'm not sure what the policies are in the US in 2016)...but it was also one-sided. The author calls for increased and improved government services for the poor and homeless, and while in theory it all sounds fine and dandy, having moved f This was my second ethnography on a homeless population, (the first being Sidewalk, which I thought was fantastic, and that certainly colored my opinion of this book, demoting it by a star. It was interesting, moving, and important. It was potentially outdated (I'm not sure what the policies are in the US in 2016)...but it was also one-sided. The author calls for increased and improved government services for the poor and homeless, and while in theory it all sounds fine and dandy, having moved from the US to a socialist country, and being friends with many people who are eligible for supplemental income from the government, I can say resolutely that it's not all it's cracked up to be. Even without the stigma (which doesn't exist here, at least among the people I know) it still brings with it a demoralizing effect, and isn't particularly accessible, even to those who qualify. There must be a better solution out there. Regardless of my opinion that differs from the author's, this book earned itself only 3 stars primarily because I felt it dragging. I usually love this sort of thing. In this case, I didn't. It was definitely good, but also definitely not great.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David

    Boring and dull. The guy's simply not the writer that, say, David Simon or Mark Bowden are, to put some snap into his sketches of assorted homeless women and the lives they lead in a couple shelters in DC. His point of 'it could happen to anyone!' is kinda undercut by the fact that pretty much everyone it happens to in his book...it couldn't happen to anyone. It can happen to any woman who's already destitute, and has a habit of taking up with alcoholic and abusive men, and possesses few marketa Boring and dull. The guy's simply not the writer that, say, David Simon or Mark Bowden are, to put some snap into his sketches of assorted homeless women and the lives they lead in a couple shelters in DC. His point of 'it could happen to anyone!' is kinda undercut by the fact that pretty much everyone it happens to in his book...it couldn't happen to anyone. It can happen to any woman who's already destitute, and has a habit of taking up with alcoholic and abusive men, and possesses few marketable skills, and is maybe borderline retarded. Yeah, among that crowd, IT COULD HAPPEN TO ANYONE. He vacillates a lot between trying to 'tell it like it is' and not trying to assign blame anywhere. On the one hand, none of these women should be homeless; on the other hand, a lot of them are kinda fucked up and it's not so surprising. On the one hand, social services deal arbitrarily, almost capriciously with the women; on the other, they're doing a hard job with arbitrary and inadequate support from the legislature, &c., &c. I get it, I get it! It's a bad bad world, and it's hard! Anything else you got for me? I've heard this song.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    This is probably the best book I've read that truly, deeply, with little bias explores what it means to be homeless and does so as an observer in a very intimate way. The author was a sociologist who started out to do this initially as a labor of love to fight his diagnosis of cancer, then realized he was going to die and turned his observations and experiences into a study which became a book. It is honest, truthful, enlightening, very depthy, and painful...but not without hope. The meat of the This is probably the best book I've read that truly, deeply, with little bias explores what it means to be homeless and does so as an observer in a very intimate way. The author was a sociologist who started out to do this initially as a labor of love to fight his diagnosis of cancer, then realized he was going to die and turned his observations and experiences into a study which became a book. It is honest, truthful, enlightening, very depthy, and painful...but not without hope. The meat of the book was collected and written mostly in the mid-1980's and it is quite interesting to see how little homelessness has changed. I'm sure programs and numbers and styles and approaches and a myriad other things have changed but the causes and effects of homelessness are essentially unchanged. To me, this speaks deeply to the human condition and our collective susceptibility to its fragility. This books uncovers and exposes it all. A must read for all humans.

  12. 4 out of 5

    4fabfelines Cox

    this book give the case histories of quite a few women in shelters and homeless states over a period of years. It tells the stories of the women from their perspective in their language. Some of the women are mentally ill or challanged some are just abused and downtrodden. This tells the stories from a clear veiw point that they see from. Whether they are jaded from drugs, abuse and/or predudice.. These women tel it like it is. Some of the stories are triumphant, the women going on to have a apartme this book give the case histories of quite a few women in shelters and homeless states over a period of years. It tells the stories of the women from their perspective in their language. Some of the women are mentally ill or challanged some are just abused and downtrodden. This tells the stories from a clear veiw point that they see from. Whether they are jaded from drugs, abuse and/or predudice.. These women tel it like it is. Some of the stories are triumphant, the women going on to have a apartment and going back to restoration with families and friends. Some of the other women dont do so well and this also tells what happened and why. Good book to partner with another called "Under the Overpass."

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sandy H

    It's my own fault, I'm sure. This book is nearly 20 years old now and our language and, hopefully to some extent, our attitudes have changed. However, I found myself stumbling over the author's use of terminology and what I perceived to be a slightly patronizing attitude. I wanted to like the book so much; it's an intriguing concept. But I couldn't make it through. I'm not faulting the author--I'm sure if he were to be writing this book today there would be a different feel to it. But I don't fe It's my own fault, I'm sure. This book is nearly 20 years old now and our language and, hopefully to some extent, our attitudes have changed. However, I found myself stumbling over the author's use of terminology and what I perceived to be a slightly patronizing attitude. I wanted to like the book so much; it's an intriguing concept. But I couldn't make it through. I'm not faulting the author--I'm sure if he were to be writing this book today there would be a different feel to it. But I don't feel it has aged well. As I've got a stack of books about homelessness on the side of my desk that I need to read within the next month or so, I didn't feel I could continue to take time on this one, so I've set it aside.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Dunn

    Tell them who I am was a great read. what better way to share the stories of homeless women than to be right there with them day to day as they face each struggle and try to dig themselves out of the situation they are in. Unless you have been there, you don't really understand. Elliot Liebow does a great job in connecting with each woman and sharing her story, how she feels and the tough choices she must make each day that people who are not homeless, are oblivious to. To gain a better understand Tell them who I am was a great read. what better way to share the stories of homeless women than to be right there with them day to day as they face each struggle and try to dig themselves out of the situation they are in. Unless you have been there, you don't really understand. Elliot Liebow does a great job in connecting with each woman and sharing her story, how she feels and the tough choices she must make each day that people who are not homeless, are oblivious to. To gain a better understanding of how some women live, and how you can help people, read this book. It will touch your heart and your soul.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sally Ooms

    Written by an anthropologist who quit his job with the Institute of Mental Health when he was diagnosed with cancer and spent the last days of his life relating to and recording the lives of homeless women. Liebow worked in the shelter, and conducted his research by spending his time with the women —not just observing, but taking part in, their lives. These were lives filled with uncertainty and fear of the world outside. Readers are a witness to the women’s humanity and are urged to drop their Written by an anthropologist who quit his job with the Institute of Mental Health when he was diagnosed with cancer and spent the last days of his life relating to and recording the lives of homeless women. Liebow worked in the shelter, and conducted his research by spending his time with the women —not just observing, but taking part in, their lives. These were lives filled with uncertainty and fear of the world outside. Readers are a witness to the women’s humanity and are urged to drop their stereotypical notions of the homeless. While this is one segment of the homeless population, my intensions in Finding Home are similar. I have interviewed both homeless women and men.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kennedy

    Heartbreaking. The plight of those at the bottom of society is so hopeless. Not only do they have very limited economic resources, but they are also more likely to experience many different forms of abuse. The author researched at three DC area shelters over several years and was able to tell they story of the shelter's inhabitants. One interesting part was the follow up with the women years later. The lucky ones were in subsidized housing. The author shows a fair portrayal of the women, how per Heartbreaking. The plight of those at the bottom of society is so hopeless. Not only do they have very limited economic resources, but they are also more likely to experience many different forms of abuse. The author researched at three DC area shelters over several years and was able to tell they story of the shelter's inhabitants. One interesting part was the follow up with the women years later. The lucky ones were in subsidized housing. The author shows a fair portrayal of the women, how personal decisions and social factors both contributed to their homelessness.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This book about homeless women isn't exactly hip and happening, and it's probably fairly elementary if you already have a firm grasp on issues facing the homeless. But I didn't, so I found this book to be pretty enlightening. It's a fast and non-academic read that will get you thinking about homelessness and the issues surrounding it. This is a valuable book that tells its story in the voices of its subjects.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lola

    Written in the participant observer style which I didn't care for too much; would've been more interesting to me if written as a story. Information on the homeless women & how they came to be living in a shelter. They had to get up & out of the shelter by 7 A.M. & wander the streets, go to the library or other indoor places to get away from the weather; they then could return to the shelters at night for a meal & a cot to sleep on. Written in the participant observer style which I didn't care for too much; would've been more interesting to me if written as a story. Information on the homeless women & how they came to be living in a shelter. They had to get up & out of the shelter by 7 A.M. & wander the streets, go to the library or other indoor places to get away from the weather; they then could return to the shelters at night for a meal & a cot to sleep on.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    In general, this was a very thorough, enlightening study of the lives of homeless women. It read a little too much like a study though and it was difficult to keep all the names and stories straight because it jumped around a lot. However, anyone who says we don't need safety nets for the poor should read this book NOW and then go volunteer at a shelter.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Clare

    A very moving and thought-provoking book. The author's respect for these women shines out. It is a bit of a gentle portrayal of homelessness, as those who work with "street people" in any large city centre will recognise, but this is an important book because it has the potential to introduce many readers to the topic of homelessness in a way they can relate to and begin to understand.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shiloh

    I had to read this book for a social work class, but it was very interesting and insightful to the lives of homeless women. This good read covers many different barriers and problems that these women face. It also breaks down some of the stereotypes of the homeless.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    The author's insight into the lives of people who are,living in the underbelly of society, is touching and truthful. Except for the Grace of the Gods, anyone could be here. Everyone should read this book. Period.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I assigned this in a social work class I taught. It is a bit dated as far as the political and economical landscape. However, the reasons for women losing their homes is the same as it is day. Leibow does a fine job of illustrating that having a home goes beyond just shelter.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Genevieve

    Informative, addresses all the subjects. A primer, I suppose. Woefully out of date at this point (1982-88). I do like his humility (as an outsider, academic, affluent male): he includes dissenting comments from his subjects as footnotes to the text.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Meen

    This is another one I just got for my research project. Again, it's a bit dated, but unfortunately the problem's only gotten worse. :(

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristine (Kris)

    I was amazed at how the women in the book did more than survive.They truly lived their lives..

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    a good account of people living on the streets

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tabitha

    really interesting...a great read

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Fryman

    A good read about how women live within a center that helps homelessness. Personal accounts from women and workers within the shelter.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Read for a sociology class and was pleasantly surprised. Does have some language -but you will not look at a homeless person the same.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.