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The Invention of the Passport: Surveillance, Citizenship and the State

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This innovative book argues that documents such as passports, internal passports and related mechanisms have been crucial in making distinctions between citizens and noncitizens. It explains how the concept of citizenship has been used over the past 200 years to delineate rights and penalties regarding property, liberty, taxes and welfare. Focusing on the United States and This innovative book argues that documents such as passports, internal passports and related mechanisms have been crucial in making distinctions between citizens and noncitizens. It explains how the concept of citizenship has been used over the past 200 years to delineate rights and penalties regarding property, liberty, taxes and welfare. Focusing on the United States and Western Europe, it combines theory and empirical data in questioning how and why states have established the exclusive right to authorize and regulate the movement of people.


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This innovative book argues that documents such as passports, internal passports and related mechanisms have been crucial in making distinctions between citizens and noncitizens. It explains how the concept of citizenship has been used over the past 200 years to delineate rights and penalties regarding property, liberty, taxes and welfare. Focusing on the United States and This innovative book argues that documents such as passports, internal passports and related mechanisms have been crucial in making distinctions between citizens and noncitizens. It explains how the concept of citizenship has been used over the past 200 years to delineate rights and penalties regarding property, liberty, taxes and welfare. Focusing on the United States and Western Europe, it combines theory and empirical data in questioning how and why states have established the exclusive right to authorize and regulate the movement of people.

30 review for The Invention of the Passport: Surveillance, Citizenship and the State

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Rankin

    The problem with genealogies is that once you get the gist of it there's just an endless amount of incredible historical detail to be gotten through, in order to understand how such-and-such contingencies lead to whatever the status quo is. The book was interesting for its explication of just how surprisingly recent the passport's history is. As well for a Foucauldian (though not in name) approach to the activeness of the power-knowledge techniques responsible for the current system. The passpor The problem with genealogies is that once you get the gist of it there's just an endless amount of incredible historical detail to be gotten through, in order to understand how such-and-such contingencies lead to whatever the status quo is. The book was interesting for its explication of just how surprisingly recent the passport's history is. As well for a Foucauldian (though not in name) approach to the activeness of the power-knowledge techniques responsible for the current system. The passport can't be explained as a large scale development trend - it only makes sense in the very specific context of individual regimes attempting to maintain power in their particular political context. It's an interesting insight. More interesting if the history is what you're into.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marietta

    definitely worth the read to anyone interested in the historical foundation of immigration policy and politics. I often reference this book in the context the evolution of citizenship and immigration systems built to exclude. This is a great way to understand the foundations of what we see and experience today as citizens all over the world. Of course it's a bit outdated to base all your facts from. I recommend following up with "The Huddled Masses Myth" by Kevin R. Johnson. Also educating yours definitely worth the read to anyone interested in the historical foundation of immigration policy and politics. I often reference this book in the context the evolution of citizenship and immigration systems built to exclude. This is a great way to understand the foundations of what we see and experience today as citizens all over the world. Of course it's a bit outdated to base all your facts from. I recommend following up with "The Huddled Masses Myth" by Kevin R. Johnson. Also educating yourself on nonwestern systems of citizenship and exclusion.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shayl

    A very interesting and well written book about the creation of nation states, and how they use passports, surveillance, and citizenship to control movement.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Benito Jr.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell Gauvin

  6. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nevcan

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zara Rahman

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bradley Farless

  11. 4 out of 5

    Caryn

  12. 4 out of 5

    DWD

  13. 5 out of 5

    Diana Miranda

  14. 5 out of 5

    Liliane

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marek Eby

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emiliya Karaboeva

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ernest

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ede

  20. 5 out of 5

    Phil

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gareth

  22. 4 out of 5

    E-Beth

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ds_Sourav

  24. 4 out of 5

    Z. B.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Henri Tournyol du Clos

  26. 5 out of 5

    Franzi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lorielle Giffin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Arthur Pignotti

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marc

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mauricio Santoro

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