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Sugar Is Made with Blood: The Conspiracy of La Escalera and the Conflict Between Empires Over Slavery in Cuba

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32 review for Sugar Is Made with Blood: The Conspiracy of La Escalera and the Conflict Between Empires Over Slavery in Cuba

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dusty

    In 1844, which in Cuba is remembered as the "Year of the Lash," the Spanish Captain-General of Cuba authorized the imprisonment and torture of thousands of slaves suspected of organizing a large-scale rebellion and a handful of white liberal intellectuals believed to have inspired them. As time has gone on historians have begun to wonder: Was there in fact a conspiracy? Or was the "conspiracy" a lie invented by the Spanish Empire's Caribbean representatives in order to simultaneously subjugate t In 1844, which in Cuba is remembered as the "Year of the Lash," the Spanish Captain-General of Cuba authorized the imprisonment and torture of thousands of slaves suspected of organizing a large-scale rebellion and a handful of white liberal intellectuals believed to have inspired them. As time has gone on historians have begun to wonder: Was there in fact a conspiracy? Or was the "conspiracy" a lie invented by the Spanish Empire's Caribbean representatives in order to simultaneously subjugate two boisterous subgroups? Paquette's book, which remains the gold star against which all other accounts of the Escalera Conspiracy must be judged, is a wealth of archival history. Yes, it's dry. But yes, it's fascinating.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Paquette does a good job of setting up the context of La Escalera and then pointing out the viable conclusions readers can draw from the evidence. He's sensitive to the various frames through which La Escalera has been viewed in the past, and he makes extra effort to argue why differences in interpretation may have occurred. This is one history book from the 80s that doesn't feel like it's from 80s (and no, I'm not sure what I mean by that either). Paquette does a good job of setting up the context of La Escalera and then pointing out the viable conclusions readers can draw from the evidence. He's sensitive to the various frames through which La Escalera has been viewed in the past, and he makes extra effort to argue why differences in interpretation may have occurred. This is one history book from the 80s that doesn't feel like it's from 80s (and no, I'm not sure what I mean by that either).

  3. 4 out of 5

    James

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nahsha

  5. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Baughman

  6. 4 out of 5

    J

  7. 5 out of 5

    Yasmin

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lea Johnson

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marian

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nschwart

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  12. 5 out of 5

    m_miriam

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joe Carlin

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sunstone Nebula

  15. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rocky Farr

  17. 4 out of 5

    Narciso Santana

  18. 4 out of 5

    Julio

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kat Becker

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carol Hix

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ernest Mcconnell.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Donald Forster

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gueu Barboza

  24. 4 out of 5

    Esther

  25. 4 out of 5

    Noah

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  28. 4 out of 5

    Temporalidae

  29. 4 out of 5

    Charles Heisser

  30. 4 out of 5

    PKN1 GoodReads

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Rodriguez

  32. 5 out of 5

    Dani Rose

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