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The long-awaited memoir from John Fogerty, the legendary singer-songwriter and creative force behind Creedence Clearwater Revival. Creedence Clearwater Revival is one of the most important and beloved bands in the history of rock, and John Fogerty wrote, sang, and produced their instantly recognizable classics: "Proud Mary," "Bad Moon Rising," "Born on the Bayou," and more The long-awaited memoir from John Fogerty, the legendary singer-songwriter and creative force behind Creedence Clearwater Revival. Creedence Clearwater Revival is one of the most important and beloved bands in the history of rock, and John Fogerty wrote, sang, and produced their instantly recognizable classics: "Proud Mary," "Bad Moon Rising," "Born on the Bayou," and more. Now he reveals how he brought CCR to number one in the world, eclipsing even the Beatles in 1969. By the next year, though, Creedence was falling apart; their amazing, enduring success exploded and faded in just a few short years. Fortunate Son takes readers from Fogerty's Northern California roots, through Creedence's success and the retreat from music and public life, to his hard-won revival as a solo artist who finally found love.


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The long-awaited memoir from John Fogerty, the legendary singer-songwriter and creative force behind Creedence Clearwater Revival. Creedence Clearwater Revival is one of the most important and beloved bands in the history of rock, and John Fogerty wrote, sang, and produced their instantly recognizable classics: "Proud Mary," "Bad Moon Rising," "Born on the Bayou," and more The long-awaited memoir from John Fogerty, the legendary singer-songwriter and creative force behind Creedence Clearwater Revival. Creedence Clearwater Revival is one of the most important and beloved bands in the history of rock, and John Fogerty wrote, sang, and produced their instantly recognizable classics: "Proud Mary," "Bad Moon Rising," "Born on the Bayou," and more. Now he reveals how he brought CCR to number one in the world, eclipsing even the Beatles in 1969. By the next year, though, Creedence was falling apart; their amazing, enduring success exploded and faded in just a few short years. Fortunate Son takes readers from Fogerty's Northern California roots, through Creedence's success and the retreat from music and public life, to his hard-won revival as a solo artist who finally found love.

30 review for Fortunate Son: My Life, My Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    J.K. Grice

    John Fogerty finally gets to tell his side of the story in regards to Creedence Clearwater Revival, and his fellow band mates. He was pretty much thrown under the bus by Doug Clifford and Stu Cook in the unauthorized bio of CCR called BAD MOON RISING. Anyway, as a huge CCR fan, this book was a joy to read. I appreciated John's personal and musical life histories, and I felt he painted an honest picture of himself. There are always plenty of Egos in rock bands, and I know there were problems in C John Fogerty finally gets to tell his side of the story in regards to Creedence Clearwater Revival, and his fellow band mates. He was pretty much thrown under the bus by Doug Clifford and Stu Cook in the unauthorized bio of CCR called BAD MOON RISING. Anyway, as a huge CCR fan, this book was a joy to read. I appreciated John's personal and musical life histories, and I felt he painted an honest picture of himself. There are always plenty of Egos in rock bands, and I know there were problems in CCR, but I also think that no one person is blameless or entirely at fault either. There are two sides to every story, and at least Fogerty has shared his own. Excellent book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    Having grown up during this era, and having had a garage band where one of the first songs we played was Born on the Bayou, I was a huge Creedence Clearwater Revival fan, and had all their LP's as I recall. Yet, I never was aware of the things going on behind the scenes except some of the stuff about Fantasy Records giving them the shaft by owning John's copyrights. Wow. To learn about all that background stuff was eye-opening and heart-wrenching at the same time. However, that is not what I lov Having grown up during this era, and having had a garage band where one of the first songs we played was Born on the Bayou, I was a huge Creedence Clearwater Revival fan, and had all their LP's as I recall. Yet, I never was aware of the things going on behind the scenes except some of the stuff about Fantasy Records giving them the shaft by owning John's copyrights. Wow. To learn about all that background stuff was eye-opening and heart-wrenching at the same time. However, that is not what I loved about this book (actually, I got the audio edition with John reading it himself). I absolutely loved this work. This had to be heart-wrenching for John Fogerty to even put it all down on paper, but I so appreciate that he did. I learned so much about him and he brought me into his life for a while. I listened to this over the period of about a month, savoring the little sessions I had while traveling. I couldn't wait to get back in my truck and head out somewhere. I was fascinated by John's early recollections of how music touched him and how one led to another to another. I was amazed at how he and later his band members were playing very cheap instruments, yet making things work--trying to make the best out of what they had to work with. It helped me relate to the first two guitars I ever owned and how hard they were to play and would even be hard to play today. I related to his early childhood because I have lived in nearby areas and so as he would say them, I knew where they were, even though many are no longer. I related to the high school scene, the high school bands, and all of that music busting out time with The Beatles bursting on the scene and the so-called British Invasion of bands, along with the San Francisco bay area bands coming up. I related to John's naivete, and how somehow poor choices haunted him and the band, and yet at the same time, the growth of an artist and world-class songwriter emerging from the cocoon of much diversity and pain. I related to the anger and bitterness of continually focusing on the past and trying to drown it in alcohol, and other distractions. I had a hard time relating to how long he went through this period of distraction, but his principles wouldn't let go and he was more determined than anyone I've ever known to take care of it, face it, deal with it, overcome it. And he has. In spite of it, and because of it, and at the same time, learning how to put it all into perspective--a perspective of acceptance and renewal. I related to the songwriting as I have been a songwriter. His process, focus, and influences touched that part of me. I related to his commitment to his craft and to learning to create and play music. I thoroughly enjoyed his explanation of songs he wrote and new things he tried in making music and especially his focus on improving his level of performance on stage, and improving his vocal approach to his songs in his own unique way. It is that unique voice, and unique approach to songwriting that made his and CCR's success. There were times I would bust out laughing at some remark or something he did, and in the last third of the book, I cried so often. It's a good thing it was an audiobook as I wouldn't have been able to read with so many tears flowing. And, it wasn't the pain that I was being sympathetic to, but his coming through the fog still standing beginning a renewed life and learning how to grasp it and hold on to it. His relationship with Julie and a new family, his coming back to music after leaving it for dead, and yet at the same time, writing new great songs. It was like birth, pain, death, and rebirth in one lifetime. This has been one of the most powerful books I have ever read and I know that I will listen to it again. Because I could relate to John and his story, I found renewed life in me. I found myself changed by this work and I am ever so grateful to John and Julie for going through the long process required to produce this delightful and encouraging review of the life and music of John Fogerty. Thank you, John and Julie for this offering. I am blessed by it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    I've always been a huge Creedence Clearwater Revival fan. So much so that in my first erotic romance for Blushing Books, HOUSE ARREST, the sinister Nokichi actually "outs" himself as an evil character by laughing at John Fogerty and his music! ("Jim Morrison . . . samurai! John Fogerty . . . ham on rye!") Unfortunately, this lengthy first-person autobiography by Creedence song writer and lead singer John Fogerty really brought out my inner Nokichi. Like big brother Alfred in LEGENDS OF THE FALL, I've always been a huge Creedence Clearwater Revival fan. So much so that in my first erotic romance for Blushing Books, HOUSE ARREST, the sinister Nokichi actually "outs" himself as an evil character by laughing at John Fogerty and his music! ("Jim Morrison . . . samurai! John Fogerty . . . ham on rye!") Unfortunately, this lengthy first-person autobiography by Creedence song writer and lead singer John Fogerty really brought out my inner Nokichi. Like big brother Alfred in LEGENDS OF THE FALL, John Fogerty is one of these people who follows all the rules ("man's rules, and God's rules") but still makes you glad the bad guys won. I mean, he's probably right that he was smarter and more talented than the other guys in Creedence, but it's really clear that he let them know it. A lot. And then when he gets outsmarted by the record label and loses all his money, he's like, "Why didn't those guys stand up for me? Why? After all the work I did for them, teaching them how to do exactly what I said on every song, making sure they didn't embarrass themselves, using my genius and superior work ethic to make them stars in spite of their own incompetence and mediocrity, still for some reason they resented me! Why, why, why?" What makes this even funnier is that the Sixties have been over for almost fifty years and he still has the same simplistic, self-serving views on Nixon and Vietnam he had at the time. "That mean bad Nixon, he just wouldn't listen! We told him the war was stinky-poo, and he just laughed at us and said the little children had to do what the grown ups said! That's why I put that song on Willie and the Poor Boys, 'Kill The Big Bad Ogre In the Castle!' Because Nixon was the ogre, man. Always shutting the doors on his people. Always calling us bums, always telling us what to do! Man, I had to knock myself out getting the drum part just right on Ogre. And the bass part too. Doug and Stu, what a couple of bums. I had to show them every part note by note!" Now you can't help but admire this man's street-level empathy for veterans. His sincerity about that shines through everything else. But what John Fogerty never figured out . . . Well, put it this way. When Kurt Cobain wrote "Smells Like Teen Spirit" he didn't want jocks and cheerleaders to like it. But of course they loved it, and it drove him crazy. But with John Fogerty, bless his innocent born-on-the-bayou soul, it's totally different. Even after forty years, he still hasn't figured out that the people who really loved "Fortunate Son" were precisely the people least likely to serve in Vietnam. That simplistic, self-pitying, poor-boy vs. the big-bad-government rhetoric he invented (with the best of intentions, I'm sure) was appropriated literally overnight by millions of affluent college kids who had nothing to fear from the draft board, and who had nothing but class-based contempt for the troops in Vietnam. And ultimately what you got twenty years down the road was a rich white feminist like Anna Quindlen (the scrappy little underdog with the Ivy League degree) waving a soiled and tattered anti-war flag while sneering that the troops in Desert Storm were "not smart, not rich, not directed enough for college." She ain't no fortunate son either, John! This is a guy who wrote some of the most poignant, understated songs in rock history, but when it comes to his own life he has no sense of humor and no sense of irony. And it's so bizarre how I reacted to his story. All my life I've read about guys like Kurt Cobain and Jim Morrison, and I've daydreamed about how wonderful it would have been if they could have been sober, responsible, hard working guys. But now that I've read this book, I'm glad they weren't. Jim Morrison . . . samurai! John Fogerty . . . ham on rye!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brad Carl

    I grabbed this audiobook from the library because I was most interested in hearing Fogerty’s story about his song rights and record label woes. At the same time, I figured it would be cool to learn more about him, his life, and CCR. I was able to accomplish all of these things. The book certainly provided an avenue for me to become interested in checking out more of Fogerty’s music, both CCR and his solo work. But the story of CCR and Fantasy Records is without a doubt the highlight of this autob I grabbed this audiobook from the library because I was most interested in hearing Fogerty’s story about his song rights and record label woes. At the same time, I figured it would be cool to learn more about him, his life, and CCR. I was able to accomplish all of these things. The book certainly provided an avenue for me to become interested in checking out more of Fogerty’s music, both CCR and his solo work. But the story of CCR and Fantasy Records is without a doubt the highlight of this autobiography. I knew it was bad. I didn’t know it was THAT bad. What’s sad is that the entire thing could’ve been avoided were it not for the band’s ignorance when they were offered a record contract by Saul Zaentz and Fantasy Records in the late 60s. Young people are naïve, and the band’s efforts to have the contract examined were not thorough. They all signed it, but it affected Fogerty the most…and still is affecting him. It’s a crying shame that someone can get screwed like that for a lifetime. But it happened. There will always be people out there just like Zaentz who don’t care one iota about a person’s feelings or artistic integrity. Why? Because it’s a business. As soon as you start making money from your art it becomes a business. And as soon as you start involving other people in your art…band members, managers, lawyers, agents, labels…it’s ALL about the money. What’s funny is how the word “business” is rarely used in this book. Please don’t misunderstand me. None of this makes any of what happened okay. In fact, not owning his songs is only one of the horrible and ridiculous things that happened to John Fogerty over the years. Arguably, his band mates caused even more grief and heartache than Saul Zaentz. Even his BROTHER for crying out loud! It didn’t surprise me at all that Tom, Doug, and Stu wound up jealous of John early and often during the CCR days. Ultimately, they destroyed the band. It happens a lot in the music industry. Honestly, here’s that word again…it happens in BUSINESS a lot. Sadly, that’s life. One thing I have to mention – when was it, exactly, that Creedence Clearwater Revival was known as the “Number 1 Band in the World?” Look, I was born right before CCR broke up. But I’m pretty sure…umm…well, you see where I’m going. I think it’s clear this book was written as more of a therapy session than anything. And that’s fine. My only complaint is Fogerty and his co-writer did not “timeline” the book very well, at all. It was maddeningly confusing at times for me, as the context would jump forward and backward. I mean, there WAS an overall timeline – the book started when he was born and ended at present day. But there was also so much back and forth. Maybe it’s the product of listening to an audiobook, but I have a feeling it’s not. I listened to Don Felder’s autobiography on audiobook and had no problems following the progression of his life, growth, heartache, feelings, marriages, children, etc. It’s very hard to explain, but Fogerty’s book is OFF in this regard. But I still enjoyed it. I learned a lot, discovered more great music, and have a new respect for Fogerty because of what he’s been through. I’d give it 3 ½ Stars if possible but because I can’t, I’m giving old John 4 Stars. He probably deserves it, right? P.S. – I’m not touching his views on war with a 10-foot pole.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tommy

    I think I would've liked the book better if I had read it instead of opting to listen to the audiobook. I was excited to hear Fogerty himself share his story, but he struggles to make it sound conversational, usually coming off like he's reading, and it's (at times) painfully obvious. I knew Fogerty was bitter about how badly he'd been screwed by Fantasy Records and Saul Zaentz, but I was surprised just how much of his life was colored by the fallout - and how little credit he gives to the other I think I would've liked the book better if I had read it instead of opting to listen to the audiobook. I was excited to hear Fogerty himself share his story, but he struggles to make it sound conversational, usually coming off like he's reading, and it's (at times) painfully obvious. I knew Fogerty was bitter about how badly he'd been screwed by Fantasy Records and Saul Zaentz, but I was surprised just how much of his life was colored by the fallout - and how little credit he gives to the other guys in CCR for the band's success. It's likely true, but gets a bit wearying. More enjoyable are stories of how he came up with some of his best songs: "Proud Mary", "Bad Moon Rising", "Centerfield", "Born on the Bayou", "Down on the Corner" and others. Those sections of the book shine the brightest. I recommend this for hardcore fans of Fogerty and CCR, but get the hardcover, not the audiobook.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Patti

    I've always felt bad for Fogerty and how he was cheated out of his own music for years. However, after reading this, I felt that maybe it was a little bit of karma. He came across as arrogant, especially when talking about how the band knew nothing and he had to teach them all everything about music. I'm sure they knew something or they wouldn't have been playing instruments prior to meeting him. I got so irritated with his "Me! Me! Me!" attitude that I skimmed the rest and still didn't care much I've always felt bad for Fogerty and how he was cheated out of his own music for years. However, after reading this, I felt that maybe it was a little bit of karma. He came across as arrogant, especially when talking about how the band knew nothing and he had to teach them all everything about music. I'm sure they knew something or they wouldn't have been playing instruments prior to meeting him. I got so irritated with his "Me! Me! Me!" attitude that I skimmed the rest and still didn't care much.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I know I sometimes succumb to my own hyperbole, but this is one of the best music autobiographies ever written. It's right up there with Patti Smith's JUST KIDS--though from a different genre, of course. Here we have a story that NEEDED telling; the record had to be set straight. Aside from the indescribable evil of Saul Zaentz--there is the triumph of love and John's epic artistic and personal integrity. Plus amazing anecdotes about writing and performing. This is a fair telling of what happene I know I sometimes succumb to my own hyperbole, but this is one of the best music autobiographies ever written. It's right up there with Patti Smith's JUST KIDS--though from a different genre, of course. Here we have a story that NEEDED telling; the record had to be set straight. Aside from the indescribable evil of Saul Zaentz--there is the triumph of love and John's epic artistic and personal integrity. Plus amazing anecdotes about writing and performing. This is a fair telling of what happened and does not come off as self-serving in any way. Had the pleasure of buying John and Julie a cup of coffee about a week before this book hit the streets. Since then I find myself playing an extended medley of John's songs on the guitar every day--it puts me right where I need to be. Thanks, John.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Huether

    I won this Free book from Goodreads First-reads. Thank you goodreads for picking my name. A very interesting story of John Fogerty. His love of music from a very young age to finding his signature sound. He formed a band which included his older brother Tom. They suffered under a corrupt manager and record company. He tells of his personal life too, his two wives and children. He is happiest now. His present wife knows how to bring out the best in John.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Danny

    A fascinating read. Despite loving all those gutsy CCR songs, I had no knowledge of the shit John went through to try and protect his own art from con artist record label execs, his band mates and even his brother. Years upon years of legal battles over royalties. Craziness. Now.. to check out his solo albums.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Don

    One of the world’s most renown singer/song-writers, first in his quite hugely popular Swamp Rock band, Creedence Clearwater Revival, and then the solo years after the band’s untimely breakup at the height of fame, John Fogerty has finally come out with this memoir of life before, during, and well after CCR. Major betrayal, heartbreak and many lost years at the hands of trusted people who turned around and took Fogerty on a long rude emotional road, through a world of depression, despair and hope One of the world’s most renown singer/song-writers, first in his quite hugely popular Swamp Rock band, Creedence Clearwater Revival, and then the solo years after the band’s untimely breakup at the height of fame, John Fogerty has finally come out with this memoir of life before, during, and well after CCR. Major betrayal, heartbreak and many lost years at the hands of trusted people who turned around and took Fogerty on a long rude emotional road, through a world of depression, despair and hopelessness due to heinous greed from every angle unimaginable. Greedy weasels abounded (even his own older brother, Tom) until John finally was able to crawl out from under the constant and continual personal and utter fiscal chaos with the help of his loving wife, muse, and emotional solid ground, Julie. That particular past trodden road has been a very long nightmare of uncertainty and self-doubt for someone who should had been vastly rewarded with the efforts he has given and that was very much well deserved. The simplicity and some of the jargon of the writing can be irritating at times, especially where Fogerty comes across as too much of a perfectionist and a bit anal with the ramblings of having to have things just right or it was dropped and his gifted talent stalled and/or wasted. The bitterness can truly be fully read between the prose presented within the rantings and recollections; but to finally learn what went on behind the scenes causing the many, many problems inflicted by Fantasy Records’ owner, Saul Zaentz, the ruthlessly dishonest legal staff that worked for Fantasy, and (the final nail) the other members of CCR when everything for John was spiralling to creative and monetary hell. He had to deal quite alone with the grief and frustrations unfairly bestowed. Now having read Fortunate Son, I felt the sorrow for him, and also joy, for John Fogerty has gotten things off his chest with the release of this book and he has become happy after all the pain of the past. Keep On Chooglin’ John and Julie Fogerty. *My thanks to the Publisher, and, of course, Goodreads for this free ARC as picked for the opportunity as a First Reader.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steve Peifer

    If you are like me and believe that Creedence was the great American band, then parts of this book will be a dream come true. His description of the process of writing and performing Proud Mary is the clearest picture of how a song comes to be born. If you love their music, there is a lot of music in this book. But there is the guy who had the brains to get his first song copyrighted but not have his contract examined by a lawyer, and the consequences of that take more room than the music. When h If you are like me and believe that Creedence was the great American band, then parts of this book will be a dream come true. His description of the process of writing and performing Proud Mary is the clearest picture of how a song comes to be born. If you love their music, there is a lot of music in this book. But there is the guy who had the brains to get his first song copyrighted but not have his contract examined by a lawyer, and the consequences of that take more room than the music. When he finally lets go, you are happy for him but pretty happier for yourself that you don't have to hear about it anymore. So happy he is sober and married to a good person, so sad the books ends with the crappy duets album he made. There is still great music in this guy; sorry it took so long to get his head clear. But the best of CCR is as good as it gets; never write off John Fogerty.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marika

    Curious about the backstory of how and why songs by Creedence Clearwater Revival were written? John Fogerty writes in a clear voice about the influences and reasons for songs such as Proud Mary, Run Through the Jungle and Looking Out My Back Door. This book will surprise even the most jaded.

  13. 4 out of 5

    William Koon

    Rock and roll is simple music. John Fogerty tells his story fairly simply: I loved music, I wrote songs, I learned to play, I formed a group, and we became one of the best bands ever in the history of rock and roll, and we were cheated out of our rights and royalties. Simple. But John takes too long to tell the tale and tells it too many times. That Saul Zaentz was one of the biggest scoundrels in the history of music, there is no doubt, Creedence made him a millionaire many times over. That he s Rock and roll is simple music. John Fogerty tells his story fairly simply: I loved music, I wrote songs, I learned to play, I formed a group, and we became one of the best bands ever in the history of rock and roll, and we were cheated out of our rights and royalties. Simple. But John takes too long to tell the tale and tells it too many times. That Saul Zaentz was one of the biggest scoundrels in the history of music, there is no doubt, Creedence made him a millionaire many times over. That he stole their earnings is fully documented. That he continued his vendetta against John for almost twenty years is true. But Fogerty hurts and must write about it compulsively as well as the perfidy of his band mates including his brother Tom who were part of this conspiracy. In between are many loving sections on music and John’s influences over the years. Unfortunately we are also treated to track by track analyses of John’s solo career. If you love CCR –and I do—you’ll enjoy this work. No, it’s not a My Life like Keith Richards’ book. And it’s tedious and overly wrought at times. But with all of his great music, we can cut John some slack in his regenerative tale.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    I actually finished this book over a month ago. I felt so conflicted after I read it that I could not bring myself to write a review. Even now, I'm sitting here, forcing myself to write. I don't want to dis John Fogerty. I like John Fogerty. Maybe, I like him even more after reading his book. I really enjoyed the beginning part, where he outlined his musical journey. This part reminded me very much of Keith Richard's book "Life". John clearly loved music at an early age and quickly listened and l I actually finished this book over a month ago. I felt so conflicted after I read it that I could not bring myself to write a review. Even now, I'm sitting here, forcing myself to write. I don't want to dis John Fogerty. I like John Fogerty. Maybe, I like him even more after reading his book. I really enjoyed the beginning part, where he outlined his musical journey. This part reminded me very much of Keith Richard's book "Life". John clearly loved music at an early age and quickly listened and learned all the technical aspects that made him a great songwriter. He honed his craft and was tough with his band mates so he could record the greatest songs. This part of the book was fantastic. One thing that gets me down about this book is the blaming. John clearly was dealt a bad hand by his record company. He signed a horrible contract. He doesn't own his early catalog now. That sucks and would embitter anyone. I understand that. But, John blames everyone but himself. All his band mates including his own brother turned against him. John feels that he was the only talent musician in Creedence Clearwater Revival and is 100% responsible for their success. Perhaps, but I feel there must be more than one side to this story. The other thing that bugged me about this book was his second wife. Now, I suspect this is the aspect that kept me from writing this review. The book is set up so we're introduced to John's wife as his savior at the beginning of the story. Since he portrays her as a true angel in the introductory chapters, I was confused when he explained how he met her at a bar while on tour. Their early courtship didn't play out romantically. It was written as if a famous drunken musician exploited a beautiful, very young girl. I'm sure his wife is a wonderful person which makes me reluctant to point out that his description of her during his courtship and marriage doesn't mesh with the gushing portrayal he sets up early on. I am glad that John found true love with his second wife and that they both are so happy. I feel that the book would have seemed more authentic if it had been structured differently, perhaps leaving off the descriptions of his current wife in the first chapter. I also noticed that he doesn't say anything about the child he had with his first wife in the latter part of the book. He does enthusiastically speak of his new children and how he enjoyed raising them. Again, I'm sure that his first wife and child would have their own story to tell.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason Fry

    Worth reading ... but know what you're signing up for. Fogerty is one of America's greatest songwriters -- "Proud Mary" and "Who'll Stop the Rain?" are modern spirituals that will endure for centuries -- and Creedence was always light-years better than the Bay Area bands of the late 1960s that were more celebrated and got more critical acclaim. "Fortunate Son" (the song) nails both its specific era and centuries-old American class divisions in a way that more people ought to listen to and reckon Worth reading ... but know what you're signing up for. Fogerty is one of America's greatest songwriters -- "Proud Mary" and "Who'll Stop the Rain?" are modern spirituals that will endure for centuries -- and Creedence was always light-years better than the Bay Area bands of the late 1960s that were more celebrated and got more critical acclaim. "Fortunate Son" (the song) nails both its specific era and centuries-old American class divisions in a way that more people ought to listen to and reckon with. The best parts of "Fortunate Son" (the book) highlight Fogerty's reflections on his musical influences and trace his evolution as a songwriter and arranger, as well as exploring the painful realization that he was essentially a solo artist who'd grown beyond a band made up of childhood friends. (If you doubt this appraisal, listen to "Mardi Gras," the only CCR album that highlights his bandmates.) Not an easy situation -- but in the stories about CCR, Fogerty comes across as a martinet all of the time and a jerk most of the time. Which is troubling considering this is his version of the band's story. What's worse is the same point can be made about his retelling of his personal relationships. The portrait you get -- once again, presumably shaped as he wanted it -- is of a deeply self-absorbed, selfish man. His first wife barely registers, despite the fact that they were married for ... well, I'm not sure how long it was, which illuminates the point. To his credit, Fogerty correctly identifies his second wife, Julie, as the hero of the story, but he never grapples with the fact that he basically enlisted Julie to be his manager, raise their children and perform the emotional labor needed for him to very slowly become a better person. Fogerty's memoir feels honest about relating the specifics about what happened, but painfully lacking in the self-reflection that ought to have spurred. For his own sake as well as his family's, I can only hope the book was the beginning of such a reckoning. Fogerty is an American genius, and this is a refreshingly honest book. That makes it worth reading. But as a fan and admirer of his, I think I would have been happier if I'd never read it. And that's a hard thing to sit with.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ray

    I bought every CCR and John Fogerty record. One Christmas long ago, my parents gave me a small stereo record player where the speakers folded out from the base. Another gift that night was CCR's "Bayou Country". I asked my dad for one of his old flannel shirts, because if a "rock star" I respected could dress in basic clothes, it was good enough for me. It was thrill to read about how those records were made and the motivation behind keeping the music simple and direct. It hadn't occurred to me I bought every CCR and John Fogerty record. One Christmas long ago, my parents gave me a small stereo record player where the speakers folded out from the base. Another gift that night was CCR's "Bayou Country". I asked my dad for one of his old flannel shirts, because if a "rock star" I respected could dress in basic clothes, it was good enough for me. It was thrill to read about how those records were made and the motivation behind keeping the music simple and direct. It hadn't occurred to me that the label, Fantasy Records, was an independent company, much smaller than the majors. So resources were limited, in a good way. As a kid, I looked for print interviews with the band to no avail. It was as if they avoided the press. I especially enjoyed his account of the transition from the pre - Creedence band The Golliwogs, to being drafted and coming out the other side with a political awareness. At midpoint in the book, Creedence breaks up. The second half of the book addresses his solo career, his wonderful second marriage and the ups and downs of creativity. Then, the details of the incredible legal entanglements with Fantasy Records owner Saul Zaentz and the other band members. In this regard, like many rock memoirs, the author has a score to settle. John grew up and lived in El Cerrito, CA for many years even when CCR was at its peak. I lived in the next towns south, Albany and Berkeley in the 70's/80's. It was a treat to visualize his stomping grounds (he lists the street names).If you are a big Creedence fan, this is well worth reading- there are spoilers but I'll refrain...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I've loved John Fogerty's music since the first Creedence Clearwater Revival record album. We went to see him in concert when he toured with his great solo CD, Blue Moon Swamp, and started finally singing Creedence songs again. The quality of his voice after all these years surprised me and his joy in finally being happy again came across to the audience. After reading this book, I understand why. However, my favorite parts of it were when he wrote about all the music that he has loved and been i I've loved John Fogerty's music since the first Creedence Clearwater Revival record album. We went to see him in concert when he toured with his great solo CD, Blue Moon Swamp, and started finally singing Creedence songs again. The quality of his voice after all these years surprised me and his joy in finally being happy again came across to the audience. After reading this book, I understand why. However, my favorite parts of it were when he wrote about all the music that he has loved and been influenced by over the years. The range of it may surprise you. One of my favorite personal moments was when, early in the book, he talked about discovering really good country when he bought Great Balls of Fire by Jerry Lee Lewis, flipped over to the B side and found "... a version of 'You Win Again' that is for the ages." The next step was seeing Hank Williams name under the title and tracking down more greats. I had the same reaction to it as a kid and have been telling people about that recording since. I also loved his descriptions of the process of songwriting. He really takes the reader inside the recording studio as well. As good as he is as a songwriter, he's not a great writer of prose. There are clunky and repetitive sections that made me put it down for a while. However, in the end, I settled into his conversational style and just enjoyed the chance to spend time with him.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alex Rivas

    I grew up listening to CCR, so I had always been intrigued to what went so wrong in that relationship. I knew that John wrote, played lead and sang all their hit songs and I saw when CCR was inducted in to the RRHF, but I had no idea all the troubles and tribulations that John had gone through. My admiration for him grew even more after reading his book, that’s all I am going to say to avoid ruining a well told rock and roll story.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Scott Smith

    Fogerty may be my biggest influence as a guitar player. At least top 3. I’ve been playing his stuff for over 30 years now. This book is a really open and honest tale, almost stream of conciousness in parts. No way he had a ghost writer. He went through what may be the worst fleecing of an artist outside of the Delta blues guys (who were fleeced relentlessly by the Chess brothers, to Zeppelin, to yes, Willie Dixon). Fogerty was fleeced. Big time. And normally when a guy talks about how great he i Fogerty may be my biggest influence as a guitar player. At least top 3. I’ve been playing his stuff for over 30 years now. This book is a really open and honest tale, almost stream of conciousness in parts. No way he had a ghost writer. He went through what may be the worst fleecing of an artist outside of the Delta blues guys (who were fleeced relentlessly by the Chess brothers, to Zeppelin, to yes, Willie Dixon). Fogerty was fleeced. Big time. And normally when a guy talks about how great he is, I immediately turn against him. Not here. John is 100% right... there is no CCR without John. The other 3 were, at best, a decent bar band. John was Special, and carried the entire load. Entire. Good read, 4 stars easy. I didn’t care for the chapter written by his wife as much, but its a good read, by one of the real good guys in rock.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    I’d say 3.5 stars. Most of the book was about the legal drama with the rest of the CCR band mates. Little draining and negative to be honest. Very defensive. Loved his story with Julie.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Richard O'Neill

    A decent read. I may have given it a higher rating if I hadn't read it right after Levon Helm's outstanding autobiography. If you liked John's music then by all means read this. It's good, just not great.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marti

    I wonder if John Fogerty employed the services of a ghost writer? Although this was enjoyable, I think the telling of his story would have benefited from someone like Neil Strauss (who wrote one of the best books ever about Motley Crue, a band whose music I really can't stand). Then again, the story of Creedence Clearwater Revival may not be the sort of tale that would make for laugh-out-loud-reading. Fogerty has too much integrity and he mostly lives up to his image as a simple unpretentious so I wonder if John Fogerty employed the services of a ghost writer? Although this was enjoyable, I think the telling of his story would have benefited from someone like Neil Strauss (who wrote one of the best books ever about Motley Crue, a band whose music I really can't stand). Then again, the story of Creedence Clearwater Revival may not be the sort of tale that would make for laugh-out-loud-reading. Fogerty has too much integrity and he mostly lives up to his image as a simple unpretentious sort who did not indulge in the sort of backstage antics the rest of the band did. On the other hand, he did seem to suffer bouts of depression as a result of his parents' divorce, marrying too young and problems with his band mates, one of whom was his brother Tom (well that explains it!). Fogerty -- who, let's face it, seemed to possess the best ear and talent for arrangement and writing -- constantly vents his frustration at them for not taking the music seriously and following his direction. In about 1972, the band imploded after he relented and let the others write three songs apiece. Though I have not heard those songs, the reviews at the time noted a decline in quality. Therefore, it seems he was right. They would have been smart to stay on the gravy train. At one point he says "Maybe I should have been like Ray Davies and bashed my brother on the head with a cymbal." That's all bad enough, but most harrowing part of the story is that all too familiar one where an evil record label convinces a group of naive teenagers to sign away rights to their material in perpetuity. (Though Saul Zaentz, owner of Factory Records, did say "If you boys do sell a lot of records, I will rip up this old contract"....NOT!!) I'm not sure which band had the worst contract, Creedence or The Stone Roses. It's hard to tell because Creedence sold millions more albums and were nowhere near being millionaires themselves even if they were certainly better off than they were pumping gas (while Fogerty wrote the material, he agreed to split royalties with the band to keep the peace). What money they earned they did not even get to keep because, you guessed it, their shady management persuaded the band to put all their money in a suspicious sounding bank in the Bahamas. Too bad Eric Burden and Badfinger were not there to advise against that. (Folks: if you are in a band and your manager mentions an "offshore tax haven in the Bahamas," run like hell.) Anyway, it took about "twenty years of frustration" but he finally did get partial vindication in the form of another hit ("Centerfield"), entry into the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame (that's another story of acrimony) and a whole new family. What he still doesn't have are the copyrights of his Creedence songs. The story of how he ALMOST got them back is far too long for this review, but it will make you mad.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    Great book jam packed with lots of information about the music business and how navigate it. He also included the inspiration and process behind the writing of a lot of his songs. There were a few things that seemed a bit dishonest though. Fogerty seems to set up the idea from the very first chapter that he was highly misunderstood and that the other guys in CCR were divas that were never happy about anything. They painted a picture of Fogerty as a completely unreasonable jerk who was impossible Great book jam packed with lots of information about the music business and how navigate it. He also included the inspiration and process behind the writing of a lot of his songs. There were a few things that seemed a bit dishonest though. Fogerty seems to set up the idea from the very first chapter that he was highly misunderstood and that the other guys in CCR were divas that were never happy about anything. They painted a picture of Fogerty as a completely unreasonable jerk who was impossible to work with, but this is false according to John. This led to CCR breaking up and the other members mutinying and basically screwing him out of his copyright royalties. It's hard to tell sometimes what's true and what's a matter of perspective or hindsight. From the beginning, Fogerty claims that he always believed in taking a group vote on all decisions affecting the band. But then he goes on to tell us about the time HE decided CCR wouldn't play encores anymore because he thought it seemed phony and the crowd got too excited. OK and not playing an encore is going to make the crowd more calm? The band had no say in the decision. Another time he decided that he would sing the backing vocals on their albums because his bandmates couldn't do it properly. He's also the one who vetoed their inclusion in the Woodstock movie because he said it sounded bad due to equipment issues. It seemed more like the crowd was half asleep from being up partying all day so John didn't want to be seen playing to a less than enthusiastic crowd. That's a pretty big decision to make for a guy who claims it was always all for one and one for all. Not to mention all his reminders that the CCR songs were his because HE wrote them. It's possible that kind of constant reminder is what may have started some of the divisions in the band. John also decided that he would be the one to manage the band because he didn't trust any of the others to do it. At one point the piano player became the bass player even though he had never played bass before because John felt a real rock and roll band needed a bass player. (Maybe he should ask The Doors about that claim) But that's an awfully big decision to make on someone else's behalf. He complained a lot about the fact that his bandmates, including his brother Tom, weren't talented enough musicians to be able to pull off the licks and notes he thought they should play. I think that may be true in some cases though their live performances seem pretty solid. I'm guessing they were decent enough players but nothing special. Stu had never even picked up a bass before John decided he should switch instruments, so it's no wonder he had a tough time making it work. It may be that John was impatient with them and didn't want to wait for them to learn the parts he had written for them. On the other hand, John is the only member of CCR that had solo success with new material which speaks volumes for where the true talent lies. The other guys did the Revisited thing that was a poor man's CCR and really showed. None of John's bandmates could make it in music once he wasn't there to prop them up. 'Nuff said There's no doubt Fogerty is very talented. But he also comes off as a guy who thinks he's the only one taking anything seriously and the only one who knows anything about music. He comes off opinionated and never wrong. Throughout the book I wondered why he didn't just find himself a new band right away. If they were so awful and couldn't even keep the rhythm, a claim he made about his brother Tom and the drummer Doug, why didn't he find more competent players? For a guy as anal as he appears to be and as serious about making music, it struck me as strange that he wouldn't get rid of these guys the minute he realized they weren't very good. Even when he was recording solo, he had some of the best session players out there and he had an issue with them, so it's not just about raw talent apparently. The other possibility is that these guys weren't that bad after all, but John just didn't trust them to enact his vision. John continually paints himself as the innocent party. I'm guessing that years of his perfectionism, no-nonsense way of speaking, and impatience may have driven his bandmates to commit the ultimate betrayal and side with Saul Zaentz. If he had just picked better bandmates who were just as driven as he was, he may have had a different experience. At the end of the day though, it's impossible not to side with Fogerty because he's the genius that created all those great songs. The other guys were puppets for John's vision. Their recent iteration of CCR, Creedence Clearwater Revisited is sorely lacking alongside Fogerty's solo performances. He's the virtuoso and the creator. The other members resented that and eventually let Fogerty know it. Sadly they kept trying to wring every cent out of CCR instead of trying to find new careers or create something of their own as John did. It's always nice to see happily married couples in the entertainment biz, but the way John discusses his wife Julie is almost obsessive and creepy at times. I don't think it's overly cynical to say that when he starts attributing successes he had before they even dated to her, it's a bit alarming. He brings her up at odd times claiming that she saved his life and is the only one who opened his eyes. It's odd because he's a guy who has always maintained control, even when he claimed to have lost control with drinking. A similar scenario played out in David Crosby's book where he obsessively talked about how great his wife was, but she came off like a gold digger and a bubblehead in the book. She went on and on about how he didn't share his drugs with her and all of his friends knew she was bad for him. As for Fogerty's wife Julie, it did strike me as strange that when she first met him, she didn't seem all that interested in getting to know him. Then suddenly she's going at him ferociously, going to wherever he's playing, leaving notes for him, and even flying to California to try to find him. It felt like she didn't realize who he really was when she met him, but when she told her friends about him, they slapped her on the head for not getting involved with a rich rockstar after her messy divorce. He keeps eluding to her showing him the light and being so smart but she doesn't come off that way in her sections in the book. (Fogerty included sections written by Julie where she goes on about her childhood and her feelings on things. Riveting stuff. Ahem.) When a control freak like Fogerty is behaving as though he wouldn't be alive without a woman, it seems off. Usually he claims that he owes his career to her which is so completely ludicrous as to be comical. He keeps saying how supportive she is but when the going got rough, she was seriously considering leaving. She really seems to enjoy being married to someone famous and even starts talking about "our friends Bruce and Patti" and all the awards shows her and John attended. Something about that rubs me the wrong way. Fame is the last thing John seems to care about. The majority of the pictures in the book are of Julie and their kids. He has exactly one picture of his first wife of over 15 years. When Julie finds out she's pregnant, John gets a pep talk from Bruce Springsteen on the joys of fatherhood. That would be great if John wasn't already a father of two kids from his first marriage! He has only one blurry pic of those kids in the book. Unfortunately, he seems to be one of those guys who divorced the kids along with their mother. He says nothing about them after he's with Julie. Really disappointing. Highly recommend this book. It's a fascinating tale of the music business and a genius entertainer.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Roy DeRousse

    The autobiography of John Fogerty. I had two goals in reading this book: 1) Understand the dynamics and breakup of Creedence Clearwater Revival, and 2) Understand the situation which caused the LONG time between the last CCR album and his solo album, Centerfield. This book certainly answered both questions. The problem is: There isn't much else to fill 390 pages. The pre-CCR stuff was interesting. It was good to hear about his marriage in 1991 to a woman who helped turn around his life. I am glad The autobiography of John Fogerty. I had two goals in reading this book: 1) Understand the dynamics and breakup of Creedence Clearwater Revival, and 2) Understand the situation which caused the LONG time between the last CCR album and his solo album, Centerfield. This book certainly answered both questions. The problem is: There isn't much else to fill 390 pages. The pre-CCR stuff was interesting. It was good to hear about his marriage in 1991 to a woman who helped turn around his life. I am glad that he finally seems happy with his life. But the rest of the book is mostly about the struggles with his band mates, the evil record company owner, and the effects that they had on him. He goes into great detail on every single problem (and there were many of them). I found that I wasn't really that interested in that much detail. I ended up skipping through the book until I came across parts that interested me more. He also spends a fair amount of time talking about his musical influences, the creation of many of the songs, his instruments, etc. Musicians or people who care more deeply about his music than I might enjoy the book more due to that. Personally, I wouldn't recommend the book to people like me who are casual fans of his music. I enjoy CCR and Centerfield a lot, but I didn't care enough for this level of detail. You can learn all you'd want to know from his Wikipedia page.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Ward

    Fortunate Son: My Life, My Music by John Fogerty (Little, Brown & Co. 2015) (780.92). John Fogerty is the man responsible for much of the playlist and soundtrack of the lives of the Baby Boomers. John Fogerty was the creator, composer, arranger and the driving force behind one of the most popular rock 'n roll bands of the 1970's, Creedence Clearwater Revival. He wrote “Proud Mary”, “Fortunate Son”, “Who'll Stop the Rain”, “Lookin' Out My Backdoor”, and many other number one hits. Surprisingly, t Fortunate Son: My Life, My Music by John Fogerty (Little, Brown & Co. 2015) (780.92). John Fogerty is the man responsible for much of the playlist and soundtrack of the lives of the Baby Boomers. John Fogerty was the creator, composer, arranger and the driving force behind one of the most popular rock 'n roll bands of the 1970's, Creedence Clearwater Revival. He wrote “Proud Mary”, “Fortunate Son”, “Who'll Stop the Rain”, “Lookin' Out My Backdoor”, and many other number one hits. Surprisingly, this book is a sad story with a happy ending. Despite all of the things that John Fogerty did right, he is a textbook example of what may happen if someone conducts business without proper legal advice. It was a tragedy, but for all of Fogerty's musical brilliance, he did not seek proper counsel before executing business contracts, and it cost him many millions of dollars. It was some time later that he learned that he had signed away the ownership of all of the songs he had written and that the bands' royalty rates were far below the industry standards. The greatest portion of this volume is a record of the author's fight with Saul Zantz to reclaim his musical legacy and his fortune. It's an interesting read, but it works best as a cautionary tale for anyone considering saving expenses by forgoing proper legal advice and counsel. My rating: 7/10, finished 10/16/16.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tom Sakell

    If John Fogerty is going to talk his autobiography into a recorder, then I have the right to speed read it while I scan. We've all been waiting a long time for Fogerty's story from the source himself. What I learned: He's really good and his band wasn't much, which is too bad. Fogerty was a tremendous lyricist, amazing singer and damn good guitarist. The others in his band weren't in his league. Fair enough. Once you've widened your circles, get a new band. Fogerty couldn't do it. Fogerty never If John Fogerty is going to talk his autobiography into a recorder, then I have the right to speed read it while I scan. We've all been waiting a long time for Fogerty's story from the source himself. What I learned: He's really good and his band wasn't much, which is too bad. Fogerty was a tremendous lyricist, amazing singer and damn good guitarist. The others in his band weren't in his league. Fair enough. Once you've widened your circles, get a new band. Fogerty couldn't do it. Fogerty never sought strong legal advice and paid for it the rest of his life. The U.S. Army was a miserable place to be in the 1960s, even in the Reserves. Making cover songs is just as good as original songs, if you can make the covers your own. His band was a bunch of dopes. Oh wait, I already said that. At the end of the book, he allows his most recent wife write his autobiography because she's a really good person. Ok.... Thanks to the Arlington County #Library for letting me be the first to get this book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bill reilly

    John Fogerty remembers being about four or five and listening to records of “Oh! Susanna” and “Camp town Races” by Stephen Foster. Mavis Staples and Mary J. Blige do blistering versions of Foster’s “Hard Times Come around Here No More.” John has excellent taste in songwriters. He was born in a small California town in 1945, with an ice cream parlor and barber shop nearby. I had a similar experience as a boy in Ossining, NY in the 1960’s. He was one of five boys, and remembers being baptized a Ca John Fogerty remembers being about four or five and listening to records of “Oh! Susanna” and “Camp town Races” by Stephen Foster. Mavis Staples and Mary J. Blige do blistering versions of Foster’s “Hard Times Come around Here No More.” John has excellent taste in songwriters. He was born in a small California town in 1945, with an ice cream parlor and barber shop nearby. I had a similar experience as a boy in Ossining, NY in the 1960’s. He was one of five boys, and remembers being baptized a Catholic at the age of two. One year at the School of the Madeline, under the thumb of Sister Damien was not a fun time for little Johnny. Second grade at a public school was a vast improvement. From an early age, music was vital, most especially black music. The Staples Singers and Bo Didley, with “I’m a Man,” were personal favorites. Elvis was young and cool in 1956, As soon as Fogerty saw him on television, it was want he wanted to be. He loved Elvis for the attitude, but Carl Perkins and Hank Williams made him become a songwriter. His vocals were influenced by Howlin’ Wolf, Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, Bo Didley and Little Richard. His guitar hero was Freddie King. I have some King on vinyl. Pete Seeger taught him how to be genuine and be a consummate entertainer. We need Pete’s voice, especially in our current state, led by an orange haired, tweeting lunatic. By the eighth grade, John was learning to play piano and guitar by listening to records and imitating what he heard. At 14, he formed the Blue Velvets with Stu Cook and Doug Clifford, two high school classmates. At sixteen, he recorded music in a small studio and later experimented with a small Sony tape recorder. He was possessed by music. His band mates were not. In 1964, John headed to San Francisco and met with Max Weiss, one of the owners of Fantasy records. The Beatles had the #1-#5 singles and John realized that he needed to add vocals to the instrumentals he had written. The early years were a warm up for the big time. John taught his brother Tom to play guitar and Stu Cook the bass. Small clubs were basically their minor league. In 1964, Fantasy released a single and crowned the band the Golliwogs with a bizarre explanation having to do with British history. It was at the time of Beatlemania. John got married at twenty and drafted into the army in 1966. He instead joined the Army Reserve and fasted to get out. He received a medical discharge in 1968. Saul Zaentz bought Fantasy records the same year. John explains the origin of the name CCR. The original contract gave the band a 10% net royalty rate, with Zaentz owning all the publishing rights. Basically, Fogerty was royally screwed. The first hit single was a cover version of Dale Hawkin’s “Susie Q.” John sang it through a mike used earlier in then day by Bing Crosby. The acrimony began in earnest at the recording session for “Proud Mary.” Fogerty was not pleased with his band mates backing vocals and redid them by dubbing only his voice. The envy only worsened over the next three years. “Proud Mary” put them on the map and he followed it with my personal favorite, “Lodi.” His inspiration was Steinbeck’s “Grapes of Wrath,” my #1 pick for greatest American novel. The first three albums were made for a total of $5,000 and finished in weeks. I recall Fleetwood Mac’s “Tusk” with the USC marching band costing $1 million. The business aspect of the record industry is notorious, and Fogerty’s epic battle with Zaentz resulted in an ulcer at twenty four. John was the star and touring only worsened the band’s chemistry. He wrote all of the songs and Tom, Stu, and Clifford were filled with resentment. After five hit albums, John’s brother Tom left the band to pursue a solo career. The man was delusional. All four Beatles had success after their breakup, but Tom vanished into obscurity. John took a sabbatical and lived in Denmark for a year. He returned to the U.S. after one year and lived unhappily with his first wife for the next fourteen years. The final album, “Mardi Gras” contained three songs each from Stu, Doug, and John. “Someday Never Comes” was the one hit song, but the rest was panned universally by critics. It was the end of CCR. Fantasy kept John under contract and released the other three. Fogerty put out a few solo records under the Asylum label after Fantasy sold them the rights. Meanwhile, John was broke due to a complicated tax haven scheme run by a Fantasy board member. Lawsuits followed with CCR receiving an insurance settlement of $8 million. The IRS took most of it for back taxes on royalties never paid by Fantasy. After a prolonged writers block of eight years, John wrote his next hit, “Centerfield.” He played all of the instruments and it was made for $35,000. Paul McCartney did the same on his first solo album. Saul Zaentz filed more lawsuits against him, and John drank in order to face his anger. The drinking continued even after he married his second wife, Julie. They blamed the ongoing legal battles. Zaentz actually sued Fogerty for plagiarizing himself, because a new song sounded similar to an older one owned by Fantasy. The company mouthpiece, Malcolm Bernstein, was the lead shark, or, attorney, in the suit. Fogerty demonstrated in the courtroom, the difference between his two songs. The books title should have been, John Fogerty, Defendant, and Saul Zaentz was a shmuck. John stopped playing for several years, and by the early 90’s took up the dobro, which he used on the album, Blue Moon Swamp. Julie gave birth to two boys and a girl. The music man had started another family at 46. I wonder how the first set of kids felt. The album took ten years to complete and was released in 1997. Tom Fogerty died of AIDS in September of 1990. They had not reconciled. S*** happens and life goes on. The album, “I Wrote a Song for Everyone” closes the book. He was happy with it and I listened to it recently, and, overall, it works. Fortunate Son is written in an easy going, conversational tone. Listen to the album, “Chronicle” to better appreciate and understand the book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Martin

    If it would be possible to give a book NO stars, I would give that to this autobiography by John Fogerty of Creedence Clearwater Revival. I chose to listen to the audiobook, thinking it would be most interesting to hear the musician read his own words. Because. he. reads. every. word. he. writes. pausing. for. effect. makes listening to the thirteen CDs in this set a rather excruciating experience. What the major problem with the book is concerns the fact that Fogerty continually rants against his If it would be possible to give a book NO stars, I would give that to this autobiography by John Fogerty of Creedence Clearwater Revival. I chose to listen to the audiobook, thinking it would be most interesting to hear the musician read his own words. Because. he. reads. every. word. he. writes. pausing. for. effect. makes listening to the thirteen CDs in this set a rather excruciating experience. What the major problem with the book is concerns the fact that Fogerty continually rants against his mismanagement and bad business deals with Saul Zaentz. And then he rants about him more. Then he rants about him more. In fact, 75% of this book is Fogerty railing against Zaentz. Enough already. I don’t need to hear 500 times that he cheated you. See a therapist and move on. What a horrible book. Footnote: in the last discs of the set, his wife Julie joins in. Unfortunately, her voice and performance in reading the material is even worse than her husband.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Roy Gilbert

    Not bad. Fogerty is a pretty self absorbed artist, but aren't they all in some way or another. I like how he talks about his musical influences and heroes, growing up in Southern California with his brothers. He talks about the entry ways to the music business in the early to mid 60's. How he met his manager and future nemesis Saul Zaentz. That is a huge part of the book. How Zaentz takes advantage of CCR and turns Tom Fogerty and the rest of the band against John. Like I said Fogerty is a pretty Not bad. Fogerty is a pretty self absorbed artist, but aren't they all in some way or another. I like how he talks about his musical influences and heroes, growing up in Southern California with his brothers. He talks about the entry ways to the music business in the early to mid 60's. How he met his manager and future nemesis Saul Zaentz. That is a huge part of the book. How Zaentz takes advantage of CCR and turns Tom Fogerty and the rest of the band against John. Like I said Fogerty is a pretty self absorbed artist, but he gives great insight into song writing, production, performing. He really is a major rock and roll dude, and continues to perform at a high level today. Bottom line, wait for the paper back to come out.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mark C. Jackson

    A great book! Full of secrets to his methods of song writing, recording, and performing. Wonderful, and sometimes sad, insights to the relationship with his band mates, and their toxic relationship with managers, producers, and record companies and executives. It is a sad state of affairs as to how he and the band were treated, and robbed of their royalties. I'm sure this has happened to many performers and bands. Just horrible. I've made sure to share these lessons learned with my young son and A great book! Full of secrets to his methods of song writing, recording, and performing. Wonderful, and sometimes sad, insights to the relationship with his band mates, and their toxic relationship with managers, producers, and record companies and executives. It is a sad state of affairs as to how he and the band were treated, and robbed of their royalties. I'm sure this has happened to many performers and bands. Just horrible. I've made sure to share these lessons learned with my young son and his band mates, hoping to prevent anything like that happening to them. I highly recommend this book to other musicians and performers, and especially to those who loved the style and music of John Fogerty, and Creededence Clearwater Revival.

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