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A lovely young American actress from the D'Oyly Carte Opera Troupe comes to 221B Baker Street on a cold November morning, desperately seeking assistance from Sherlock Holmes. Inexplicably, Holmes agrees to help, even though the Prime Minister of England and his cabinet need Holmes to solve a murder case that could threaten a high-stakes meeting with John D. Rockefeller and A lovely young American actress from the D'Oyly Carte Opera Troupe comes to 221B Baker Street on a cold November morning, desperately seeking assistance from Sherlock Holmes. Inexplicably, Holmes agrees to help, even though the Prime Minister of England and his cabinet need Holmes to solve a murder case that could threaten a high-stakes meeting with John D. Rockefeller and J.P. Morgan. The clock is ticking. Holmes will need all his physical and deductive powers to preserve innocent lives and prevent political and economic chaos on both sides of the Atlantic. Yet even Holmes cannot foresee how much the ultimate outcome will depend on a mother's sacrifice, a daughter's hopes, and on the true identity of the last Moriarty.


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A lovely young American actress from the D'Oyly Carte Opera Troupe comes to 221B Baker Street on a cold November morning, desperately seeking assistance from Sherlock Holmes. Inexplicably, Holmes agrees to help, even though the Prime Minister of England and his cabinet need Holmes to solve a murder case that could threaten a high-stakes meeting with John D. Rockefeller and A lovely young American actress from the D'Oyly Carte Opera Troupe comes to 221B Baker Street on a cold November morning, desperately seeking assistance from Sherlock Holmes. Inexplicably, Holmes agrees to help, even though the Prime Minister of England and his cabinet need Holmes to solve a murder case that could threaten a high-stakes meeting with John D. Rockefeller and J.P. Morgan. The clock is ticking. Holmes will need all his physical and deductive powers to preserve innocent lives and prevent political and economic chaos on both sides of the Atlantic. Yet even Holmes cannot foresee how much the ultimate outcome will depend on a mother's sacrifice, a daughter's hopes, and on the true identity of the last Moriarty.

30 review for The Last Moriarty

  1. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are enlisted by the Prime Minister to solve the murder of John D. Rockefellers security agent before the incident can derail an upcoming British-American summit. At the same time, a young woman contacts Holmes to help her find her parents. I was quite looking forward to reading this book after seeing it on Amazon and was happy when I saw it on NetGalley. Now I'm glad that I didn't buy it since it was so predictable that it was hard to enjoy reading the book. Predict Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are enlisted by the Prime Minister to solve the murder of John D. Rockefellers security agent before the incident can derail an upcoming British-American summit. At the same time, a young woman contacts Holmes to help her find her parents. I was quite looking forward to reading this book after seeing it on Amazon and was happy when I saw it on NetGalley. Now I'm glad that I didn't buy it since it was so predictable that it was hard to enjoy reading the book. Predictable and sometimes utterly jaw dropping ridiculous. Especially when it comes to Sherlock Holmes, or I should say that all that is ridiculous with this book has to do with Sherlock Holmes, because he is nothing like Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and that's the biggest problem with the book. Giving Sherlock Holmes a past that really goes against the man that Doyle wrote about is something I just can't abide with. I also had some problem with the story, the biggest problem was that the characters weren't that memorable. It felt like every time I picked up the book and they mentioned some name I just sat there thinking "who was he again?". Also, jealousy over a woman that's why professor Moriarty set out to destroy Holmes? Come on! So no, this book didn't work for me. I'm picky when it comes to Sherlock Holmes stories. I want Sherlock Holmes to be Sherlock Holmes, not some romanticized version and I want a good story! I received this copy from the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    Perfectly enjoyable pastiche. One might wish for slightly more deductions that made the man so famous and slightly less melodrama, but alas, there it is. Plenty of twists and turns and some pretty clever uses of real historical figures and events, as the famed detective uses his inimitable mind to prevent another November 5th from occurring, all while navigating some...well some family drama. Interesting spin on the character's history and, of course, left sequel ready. Fun quick read. Perfectly enjoyable pastiche. One might wish for slightly more deductions that made the man so famous and slightly less melodrama, but alas, there it is. Plenty of twists and turns and some pretty clever uses of real historical figures and events, as the famed detective uses his inimitable mind to prevent another November 5th from occurring, all while navigating some...well some family drama. Interesting spin on the character's history and, of course, left sequel ready. Fun quick read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Fred Hughes

    Any time a Moriarty is involved you know Sherlock is going to have his hands full. Add in a top secret government meeting between the PM and several american billionaires and you have a recipe for some evil to pop up. Some plot twists and revelations that Sherlock fans will love Recommmended

  4. 5 out of 5

    Les Wilson

    I enjoyed the book and hope that this is indeed the end of the Moriarty group. Reoccurring villains is a little too much. Recommend this book as it also explains the Lucy James origins. It was in the hope of the latter that I read this volume.

  5. 5 out of 5

    M.R. Graham

    Three and a half stars, for me. The Premise: A meeting between captains of industry is threatened. Men connected with the upcoming meeting keep turning up dead, and all signs indicate that a criminal organization on par with the defunct Moriarty gang is responsible. Possibly even the successor of the Moriarty gang, as Colonel Sebastian Moran has escaped from prison, and he had help. Into the mix is thrown a young actress, Lucy James, whose ties to this shadowy organization grow ever more perplexing Three and a half stars, for me. The Premise: A meeting between captains of industry is threatened. Men connected with the upcoming meeting keep turning up dead, and all signs indicate that a criminal organization on par with the defunct Moriarty gang is responsible. Possibly even the successor of the Moriarty gang, as Colonel Sebastian Moran has escaped from prison, and he had help. Into the mix is thrown a young actress, Lucy James, whose ties to this shadowy organization grow ever more perplexing and sinister as she enlists Holmes's help to hunt for her true parents. At the same time, both Miss James's plight and the murderous plot begin to shed light on Sherlock Holmes's past. The Good: The writing is lovely, and amazingly faithful to the source. It's very rare to find pastiche that really has the sound and the feel of Conan Doyle's writing. Watson's voice is authentic, and at no point was I drawn out of the story by awkwardly modern - or awkwardly Victorian - language. It is also very well researched, with that strong sense of place that is so essential to mystery and to Holmesian mystery particularly. Well researched without being a treatise on Victoriana. Some works have a tendency to lift passages straight from textbooks, but all of Veley's references feel natural. The Bad: Much of the story was, sadly, predictable, and the foreshadowing heavy-handed. Certain twists were not so much hinted as laid out. Nothing ever really surprised me, and the mystery was thin. I would also have liked more sleuthing, more of the hunting and connecting that ought to characterize Holmes stories. I'd characterize this one more as suspense than mystery, which I suppose is all right, but wasn't what I was expecting. Worth Noting: Veley's Holmes is an emotional sort. I am not one of those who thinks Holmes should always be an emotionless machine - he shows himself in Canon to feel strongly, though he generally keeps his feelings under tight control. In the context of Veley's storyline, I feel that the little displays of affection, distress, and concern were entirely appropriate, but I do know that many aficionados would take issue. In Conclusion: I enjoyed this one. I finished it in two sittings, which has been an increasingly rare occurrence for me. It did not blow me away, but the end hints at a coming sequel, and I will certainly look for it when it arrives. I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Thompson

    Excellently paced with enough action to support the detailed moments of sleuthing. I particularly enjoyed the added female companions to Sherlock's roster. Excellently paced with enough action to support the detailed moments of sleuthing. I particularly enjoyed the added female companions to Sherlock's roster.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Charles Veley brings us a slightly warmer Holmes with a hither to unknown backstory and a new member of his circle of trusted individuals. Although a bit different in tone from the original Sherlock Holmes tales, this book is every bit and good and should be a joy to all fans of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shirley

    Elementary my dear Watson What a good book. I had read all Sherlock books and am so happy to find someone picking up the story. Truly enjoyable

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Ragan

    I've been a fan of the Sherlock Holmes stories since I was in junior high, when I used to watch the old Basil Rathbone movies on Sunday afternoons. One year around 8th or 9th grade, someone bought me a volume of the complete stories for my birthday, which I devoured over the course of the summer. (“The Adventure of the Second Stain” being a favorite. ) I can truthfully say they've had an influence on my life, since, thanks to the “malign” influence of Rathbone and Holmes' creator Arthur Conan Do I've been a fan of the Sherlock Holmes stories since I was in junior high, when I used to watch the old Basil Rathbone movies on Sunday afternoons. One year around 8th or 9th grade, someone bought me a volume of the complete stories for my birthday, which I devoured over the course of the summer. (“The Adventure of the Second Stain” being a favorite. ) I can truthfully say they've had an influence on my life, since, thanks to the “malign” influence of Rathbone and Holmes' creator Arthur Conan Doyle, I've been a pipe-smoker since high school. (Don't worry. I've stayed away from the “seven-percent solution”) Since then, I've occasionally read modern pastiches on the Holmes stories. Some were excellent, such as Nicholas Meyer's “The Seven Percent Solution” (Dear God, why isn't this in Kindle format???), while others were just awful. The good ones not only captured the feel of late Victorian London, but understood Holmes' and Dr. Watson's characters, how they would speak, and their relationship to each other. The bad ones were only “Holmes in name only” and often had the characters saying or doing things they just wouldn't in “reality,” or thinking and speaking like a modern person. Some clearly had axes to grind or thought they were being edgy, making me wonder why the Doyle estate didn't sue them for damages. I'm happy to say, however, that “The Last Moriarty” by Charles Veley largely falls into the “good pastiche” category. In fact I'd say it's very good and well-worth a fan's time and money. (Warning: mild spoilers may follow.) The story opens with the discovery of a dead American floating in the Thames. First ruled a suicide, Holmes (naturally) concludes it was a murder. He then learns the victim was in the employ of the Rockefellers and was in London as an advance man checking into security for a meeting between the highest levels of the British government and the richest men in America: Rockefeller, Morgan, and Carnegie. From there the plot involves multiple murders, terrorism, blackmail, Great Power intrigue, secrets from Holmes' own past, not one, but two damsels in distress, and Gilbert and Sullivan. Famous characters from the time also make their appearance: not only the Americans, but Prime Minister Salisbury and the impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte. And, as the title avers, Professor Moriarty himself is somehow tied up in this. Author Veley paces the story well. Like a serial publication from that era, the story is broken up into many short chapters. The pacing is swift, but never rushed. An average reader could easily finish this over a weekend or even a single long night. Veley captures the London of Doyle's tales nicely: you almost hear the horses' hooves' clack against the cobbles and feel the cold wind off the Thames. The characters largely sound like they should, too. My favorite dramatic interpretation of Holmes was the late Jeremy Brett's, whose performances in a British series from the 1980s and 90s set a bar I don't think anyone will ever clear, even Benedict Cumberbatch. When reading Veley's “Holmes,” I can hear Brett saying the lines. That to me is a mark of his success. He's less successful with Watson's narrative voice, which doesn't sound quite right to me, and I think he gets it wrong when characters address each other by their first names. It's fine for the Americans, being a less formal people than the British, but for our two leads to call each other “Sherlock” and “John” with regularity, instead of “Holmes” and “Watson,” is off: acquaintances would say “Mr. Holmes” or “Dr. Watson;” male friends would address each other with last names without the honorifics. First names would only be used under moments of stress or emotional significance. This is a minor quibble, though. Where I think the author really missteps is in his two final twists. No spoilers, but they involve Holmes' past and, I think, go one step too far in reinterpreting the character. The revelations go against two of Holmes' major attributes: his misogyny and, more importantly, the role of Irene Adler as “The Woman.” Veley handles the consequences of this well, but it's a step I would not have taken. Some might criticize the villain for being a two-dimensional caricature, but I think it fits fine with what is, after all, a melodrama involving the theater. Overall, I highly recommend Charles' Veley's “The Last Moriarty” to fans of period mysteries in general, and Sherlock Holmes fans in particular. It's enjoyable, fun, and even a bit gripping – a definite three-pipe read. Note on the Kindle edition: Too often reviews of Kindle books make no mention of the format or the quality of the translation to electronic media – and Amazon is far too tolerant of publishers selling error-laden Kindle books. I'm happy to report “The Last Moriarty” has no such problems: the formatting is clean and easy to read, and I could find no typos that I recall. Well done!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rev Gary

    First read Sherlock Holmes in my college days. I am glad his adventures continue.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Malorie (Firereader)

    I was pleasantly surprised how much this story felt like it was written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I kept having to remind myself that this book was recently. Veley did an excellent job crafting a seamless continuation of the famous fictional detective. Bringing Lucy James into this series as a main character sets Veley's Holmes apart from Doyle's and gives it its own voice. I don't usually like modern continuations of classics (especially mysteries) but I liked this. I felt a bit bored at times I was pleasantly surprised how much this story felt like it was written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I kept having to remind myself that this book was recently. Veley did an excellent job crafting a seamless continuation of the famous fictional detective. Bringing Lucy James into this series as a main character sets Veley's Holmes apart from Doyle's and gives it its own voice. I don't usually like modern continuations of classics (especially mysteries) but I liked this. I felt a bit bored at times but I've experienced that a occasionallg in some of Doyles stories and to me it just adds more authenticity to the story.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jen (That's What I'm Talking About)

    For fans of the original Sherlock Holmes tales comes this interesting twist on what became of Holmes after his battle with Moriarty in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Final Problem." It is a few years after John Watson wrote of Sherlock’s death, and everyone assumes he is dead. The pair, still living on Baker Street, keeps a low profile while working occasionally for select clients, including Sherlock’s brother Mycroft and the British government. Holmes and Watston are brought in on a case because For fans of the original Sherlock Holmes tales comes this interesting twist on what became of Holmes after his battle with Moriarty in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Final Problem." It is a few years after John Watson wrote of Sherlock’s death, and everyone assumes he is dead. The pair, still living on Baker Street, keeps a low profile while working occasionally for select clients, including Sherlock’s brother Mycroft and the British government. Holmes and Watston are brought in on a case because wealthy American, John Rockefeller’s head of security was murdered as he was preparing for a secret meeting involving Mr. Rockefeller, British officials, and other powerful Americans. The story gets more interesting with the appearance of an American actress, Ms. Lucy James, and her ties to both the young Johnny Rockefeller and the deceased James Moriarty. Told much in the style of the original Sherlock Holmes tales, The Last Moriarty is shared via the memoirs of John Watson. Keenly observant, Watson details his observations on the physical and emotional aspects of the case and his friend, Holmes. Watson’s account is intimate, due to Watson’s close connection to Sherlock, giving readers insight into Holmes’s state of mind and well-being. The story shares the intertwining aspects of a plot against Mr. Rockefeller, et. al., and the origins of Ms. James, both equally riveting and interesting. Overall, I enjoyed The Last Moriarty a lot; however, here is my problem. *start mini-rant* I was directed to listen to The Crown Jewel Mystery, the Sherlock Holmes and Lucy James Mystery prequel first. In that book, we learn all about Lucy James and her good friend Johnny Rockefeller. They traveled to London together, and he constantly was proposing to her. Now I go back to this book, the first one, written well before the fourth book, even though chronologically it takes place after it, and we learned that Lucy and Johnny are just acquaintances and in fact, hadn’t spoken since a concert many years ago. This is in direct conflict to what we learned in the prequel. In other words, book 4, the prequel, was modified to make a more interesting backstory, but it does not fit with what was originally planned in the series. This makes me nuts when a prequel is written after a series has been established, and the author/s change established backstory. *end rant* Anyhow, it bugged me for a while, but by the midpoint of The Last Moriarty, I was so engrossed in the story that the prequel fled my mind. Narration: Mr. Petherbridge does a great job. With his British accent and easy cadence, he fits the historical setting and feel of the book. He spends most time narrating Watson’s journal, which is shared in Watson’s first person POV. However, the story has extensive recounting of character dialogue, and Mr. Petherbridge adjusts his tone and accents appropriately. The individual voices aren’t wholly unique but distinguishing enough. He switches between British and American accents seamlessly. His female voices are slightly higher and softer, more feminine. My Ratings: Story: B/B+ Narration: B ​

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kayla West

    Okay...so I have to admit that there was a teensy tiny part of me that only bought this book because of my slight obsession with the show Sherlock. I have been dying to find out who is in fact going to be coming back in Moriarty's place in this fourth and possibly final season of the show (hopefully a woman, because there are not enough crazy women on that show), and so I thought this book, due to its title, might give me some sort of clue. Admittedly, it gave me no ideas, but I was really glad Okay...so I have to admit that there was a teensy tiny part of me that only bought this book because of my slight obsession with the show Sherlock. I have been dying to find out who is in fact going to be coming back in Moriarty's place in this fourth and possibly final season of the show (hopefully a woman, because there are not enough crazy women on that show), and so I thought this book, due to its title, might give me some sort of clue. Admittedly, it gave me no ideas, but I was really glad that I bought it. The character of Sherlock Holmes has always been intriguing to me, and ever since I first read my first Sir Arthur Conan Doyle story starring this intellectual at a very young age, I have kind of felt a kinship toward Holmes. And Watson as well. So it was with a light heart that I began to read. In this book, as with all the stories that I know, it has been written from Watson's point of view. Now as most of us know, he sometimes can be a little bit out of the loop from Holmes, which can be slightly annoying, but it makes him a sort of endearing character. The author of this work did justice to this fact. I also quite loved that it had a new age feel to it. There were times that I definitely could relate it to being a possible continuation of the old works, it had a bit of the Doyle touch in some parts, but it also had that "new car smell." You could tell it had been written with a more recent hand. It felt clean and fresh. The characters in this, besides Holmes and Watson, were wonderfully likeable, and I liked that Holmes has a secret past in this one. A past that subconsciously I know could definitely have happened, but one that I would not have imagined myself. At first I was a bit pensive about this part of his past, I thought "this isn't the Holmes I know", but after a few days of contemplation, it kind of fits. And although there is one part I might still be in denial over regarding his past life, I think this story was beautifully done. I have to admit that there were so many twists and turns regarding the crimes of this story, it sometimes became a bit confusing and overwhelming, so this is a book more to be savoured than devoured to properly be able to appreciate this particular work.

  14. 5 out of 5

    John Schork

    Good read Good alignment with original mysteries, ok characters, fair pace look forward to further character development in later books and more venues like the original books.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Swafford

    When the Prime Minister and his cabinet requires Holmes to solve a murder involving John D. Rockefeller and J.P Morgan, the great detective obliges, intrigued by the details of the case. A young actress brings new light onto the case, and changes everything. As far as pastiches go, this is done very well. Told from the point of view of Dr. Watson, it's very similar to Conan Doyle's voice, which is not easy to do. The new characters are interesting enough in their own way. The mystery was a little When the Prime Minister and his cabinet requires Holmes to solve a murder involving John D. Rockefeller and J.P Morgan, the great detective obliges, intrigued by the details of the case. A young actress brings new light onto the case, and changes everything. As far as pastiches go, this is done very well. Told from the point of view of Dr. Watson, it's very similar to Conan Doyle's voice, which is not easy to do. The new characters are interesting enough in their own way. The mystery was a little disappointing. Everything seemed complicated at first, but it really wasn't. Holmes, if I'm perfectly honest, was more sentimental than I expected, which was interesting to see but not the Holmes I love. For Holmes lovers who like to try something new, I would recommend this.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    I am going to have to call it quits on these Sherlock imitations. I have yet to find one that captures the energy and brilliance of Doyle's original. And this one--this is one of the worst. The story was trite. The characters confusing at best and flat at worse. And worst of all, it seemed that the author kept throwing in all this historical information not because it was necessary to the story or that it helped flesh out the story but because he wanted to wow the reader with all his research. If I am going to have to call it quits on these Sherlock imitations. I have yet to find one that captures the energy and brilliance of Doyle's original. And this one--this is one of the worst. The story was trite. The characters confusing at best and flat at worse. And worst of all, it seemed that the author kept throwing in all this historical information not because it was necessary to the story or that it helped flesh out the story but because he wanted to wow the reader with all his research. If you are thinking of giving this a go, don't. Spend your time re-reading one of your favorite Sherlock by Doyle stories. Trust me, you'll be better off.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Charles van Buren

    Does not end as strongly as it begins, April 20, 2016 This review is from: The Last Moriarty (A Sherlock Holmes and Lucy James Mystery) (Kindle Edition) The plot is stretched rather thin in places and often depends upon coincidence. Family relationships play a large part in the story. Some of those relationships are not very believable. Holmes and Watson bumble along into danger and capture by the villains far too often. Many of the characters are real life people, including John D. Rockefeller an Does not end as strongly as it begins, April 20, 2016 This review is from: The Last Moriarty (A Sherlock Holmes and Lucy James Mystery) (Kindle Edition) The plot is stretched rather thin in places and often depends upon coincidence. Family relationships play a large part in the story. Some of those relationships are not very believable. Holmes and Watson bumble along into danger and capture by the villains far too often. Many of the characters are real life people, including John D. Rockefeller and family, J. P. Morgan, Richard D'Oyly Carte, a mention of Theodore Roosevelt, Adam Worth (one of the models for Professor Moriarty) and several others.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    This was an enjoyable read of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson’s adventures after Sherlock’s reported “death” in a conflict with Moriarty. It had some interesting and surprising twists and turns and an ending that suggests others will be written. I would look forward to a further read with Sherlock, Watson and Lucy.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bargain Sleuth Book Reviews

    For this and other book reviews, visit www.bargain-sleuth.com I’m always up for a good Sherlock Holmes pastiche. Some are better than others. I stumbled across The Last Moriarty (Amazon) when looking for Kindle Deals. When I saw that the books in the series were all reasonably priced and highly rated, I took a chance and bought volume 1. A few years have passed since John Watson wrote of Sherlock Holmes’ death in “The Final Problem” and most people assume he is dead. But the two men keep their hea For this and other book reviews, visit www.bargain-sleuth.com I’m always up for a good Sherlock Holmes pastiche. Some are better than others. I stumbled across The Last Moriarty (Amazon) when looking for Kindle Deals. When I saw that the books in the series were all reasonably priced and highly rated, I took a chance and bought volume 1. A few years have passed since John Watson wrote of Sherlock Holmes’ death in “The Final Problem” and most people assume he is dead. But the two men keep their heads low and continue to take work from select clients, which includes Mycroft Holmes and his part of the British government. One of those cases involves American John D. Rockefeller. His head of security was murdered as he was headed for a secret meeting between Rockefeller, British officials, and other powerful Americans like J.P. Morgan. Through all this, Holmes and Watson are introduced to an American actress named Lucy James, who has ties to both Moriarty and John D. Rockefeller’s son, Johnny. There are some good things about this book. The Last Moriarty sounds just like Conan Doyle’s writing. Sometimes pastiche can be hit or miss in that department, and in this case, Watson’s voice sounds just like the canon. The book appears to be well researched with it’s references to places and people of the times. However, despite capturing the essence of a Holmes story, I found the story rather predictable, but in a comfortable way. There were few times when I was surprised by what was happening because there was so much foreshadowing. There were no twists to the story because all the information was given out throughout the story. Indeed, the big reveal at the end was not surprising at all. Overall, it wasn’t so much a mystery as it was a suspense novel, which I didn’t mind. If you’re looking for a heavy mystery, this book isn’t it. If you’re looking for a passable Sherlock Holmes story, this will do just fine. I think I’ll continue with this series; there are about 20 books or short stories.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    The Last Moriarty Earns 5+/5 Classic Conundrums…Engaging Favorite! I am a big fan of Doyle’s adept detective, Sherlock Holmes, along with many of the reimagined versions. Case in Point: Charles Veley’s Sherlock Holmes & Lucy James series is one destined to be one of my “Surprise Finds of 2021.” With its well-written narrative and dialogue in a Doyle-like style, clever premise, rich characters, exciting mystery, and all-the-way-to-the-end engaging intrigue, it is all from Watson’s first-person per The Last Moriarty Earns 5+/5 Classic Conundrums…Engaging Favorite! I am a big fan of Doyle’s adept detective, Sherlock Holmes, along with many of the reimagined versions. Case in Point: Charles Veley’s Sherlock Holmes & Lucy James series is one destined to be one of my “Surprise Finds of 2021.” With its well-written narrative and dialogue in a Doyle-like style, clever premise, rich characters, exciting mystery, and all-the-way-to-the-end engaging intrigue, it is all from Watson’s first-person perspective. Immediately grabbing my attention with an early morning rousting by Sherlock’s brother Mycroft and a clandestine visit to the morgue to inspect a suicide, but with Sherlock’s consummate skill he explains the young man was murdered. After further insights that prove his worth and back and forth debate with the highly positioned British officials also in attendance, there is a massive explosion that, as the Prime Minister described, created a “zone of danger.” Whew! And that’s just the first two chapters! What occurs after that is a clever, complex, and totally engaging mystery with international implications, an actress with a shocking revelation, and although Moriarty’s death at Reichenbach and subsequent arrests and conviction of his colleagues causing his powerful organization to be unceremoniously dismantled, one of his infamous assassins has escaped from prison. Not much to fear when Holmes is on the case! Veley has his own writing style, but fans of Doyle’s will be thrilled with how he maintains the familiar personalities, connections, and investigative style, yet adds his own twist and turns, real-life figures, and a new relationship of which Doyle never “conceived,” pun intended. There are several full-length adventures and short stories to keep this fan totally engaged!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kim Taylor

    I love the original Sherlock Holmes stories and books, and I enjoy many pastiches. This one was...okay. It kept my attention enough to finish the story, but it only earned 2.5 stars (rounded to 3). A brief synopsis: this story takes place after Holmes' return to London after Reichenbach Falls, but before Watson writes "The Adventure of the Empty House", so that the general public isn't aware that Holmes is not dead. In advance of a meeting between the British government and American oil tycoons ( I love the original Sherlock Holmes stories and books, and I enjoy many pastiches. This one was...okay. It kept my attention enough to finish the story, but it only earned 2.5 stars (rounded to 3). A brief synopsis: this story takes place after Holmes' return to London after Reichenbach Falls, but before Watson writes "The Adventure of the Empty House", so that the general public isn't aware that Holmes is not dead. In advance of a meeting between the British government and American oil tycoons (including Rockefeller and Morgan) to discuss conversion of the British navy from coal to oil, Holmes is hired by the Rockefeller's son to look into the death of a Pinkerton agent. A plot to disrupt the meeting is discovered, and the game is afoot. One aspect of the story I liked was the scenes involving "The Mikado" and the Savoy Theatre, including appearances by Richard D'Oyly Carte. G&S fans will appreciate going onstage and backstage with the original D'Oyly Carte Company, and a performance has a central role in the action. Which brings me to an aspect I did not like: the character of Lucy James. Lucy is an American singer who is performing in "The Mikado". She's also a Holmes fan who is observant, intelligent, and beautiful. Lucy is too perfect - she's a Mary Sue who can sing, deduct/induct, and handle a pistol. Lucy will be appearing in future books in this series, and I hope she develops more of an interesting character. I own the next book (thank you, Kindle sales!), so I will read it, but I'm not sure about other books in the series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lloyd

    This is another expansion of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries. In this one, Lucy James, a new and future recurring character is introduced. I won’t say much about this character because I don’t want to spoil the story for future readers. She is an interesting character, but I’ll reserve full evaluation of this expansion of the Holmes mysteries until I see in future episodes of this series how she is more fully integrated into the storyline. The familiar characters such as Mrs. Hudson, Dr. Watson, M This is another expansion of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries. In this one, Lucy James, a new and future recurring character is introduced. I won’t say much about this character because I don’t want to spoil the story for future readers. She is an interesting character, but I’ll reserve full evaluation of this expansion of the Holmes mysteries until I see in future episodes of this series how she is more fully integrated into the storyline. The familiar characters such as Mrs. Hudson, Dr. Watson, Mycroft and Lestrade are all included in this book and they are faithfully portrayed as in Conan Doyle fashion. The Victorian atmosphere is realistic and always a great part of the Holmes tradition. Other historical figures are included in this plot, including John D. Rockefeller and his son John, J.P. Morgan and Andrew Carnegie along with various British politicians of that 1895 era. The lives of many these famous people are in jeopardy. Delicate international alliances are being formed and negotiated. These alliances are threatened by the actions of Moriarty. Wait, I thought he died at the Reichenbach Falls? Don’t get ahead of yourself, it will all be explained. And it will be an interesting explanation and mystery. The one drawback to this mystery, as well as most Sherlock Holmes mysteries, is that Sherlock withholds critical information from Dr. Watson and therefore us, the reader. I would rather be provided with all clues as they become available, but that is not the Sherlockian way.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marfita

    Yet another alternative Holmes outside-the-canon-let's-get-some-women-in novel. I got this on the strength of the Edward Petherbridge narration of the audiobook. Drool drool, love him from Lord Peter days. Also needs to pull back a bit on those Amurrikin Rs. I don't suppose, looking at the addition to the title (enumerating the series), that it will be much of a surprise as to who Lucy James is. Of course, everything seems to surprise Watson, who is narrating this. The style is very much like the Yet another alternative Holmes outside-the-canon-let's-get-some-women-in novel. I got this on the strength of the Edward Petherbridge narration of the audiobook. Drool drool, love him from Lord Peter days. Also needs to pull back a bit on those Amurrikin Rs. I don't suppose, looking at the addition to the title (enumerating the series), that it will be much of a surprise as to who Lucy James is. Of course, everything seems to surprise Watson, who is narrating this. The style is very much like the original, with perhaps a bit more gun-play, probably because Americans are involved. It's set during an historical period with real historical personages such as the Rockefellers and British pols. Veley adds a nice historical note at the end. Britain plans to replace their coal-fueled fleet of warships with gasoline-fueled ones. To this end, they are meeting with the appropriate American Robber Barons. Certain other foreign powers might not like this updating of the fleet and so they might meddle. Holmes and Watson must face an old enemy and relatives of an old enemy to thwart any thwarting so Britannia may continue to Rule the Waves. Hurrah! Very well written and so good to listen to Petherbridge again. slight spoiler thingie below Is Veley hinting that Mycroft and Richard D'Oyly Carte have a ... relationship? I'm shocked! (Heh!)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Madelon

    To say I am a fan of the Sherlock Holmes trope would be an understatement. When I find new stories that are every bit as good as Conan Doyle's I don't just read them… I devour them. THE LAST MORIARTY is one of those books. The writing is excellent and has the feel of the original tales I have long enjoyed. There are any number of other writers who have taken pen to the task of keeping Sherlock Holmes fresh and new, but few have succeeded as seamlessly. As the formula dictates, the story is related To say I am a fan of the Sherlock Holmes trope would be an understatement. When I find new stories that are every bit as good as Conan Doyle's I don't just read them… I devour them. THE LAST MORIARTY is one of those books. The writing is excellent and has the feel of the original tales I have long enjoyed. There are any number of other writers who have taken pen to the task of keeping Sherlock Holmes fresh and new, but few have succeeded as seamlessly. As the formula dictates, the story is related by Dr. John Watson who explains that this tale took place after the "death" of Holmes at Reichenbach Falls at a time few knew of his resurrection. Holmes implored Watson to never tell this tale, but the good doctor wrote it and stipulated that it not be published until the twenty-first century. Charles Veley has used historical figures to add a certain realism to the first story of Sherlock and Lucy. Who is Lucy James, you ask? Finding out is part of the overall charm of the narrative. You will be led down dark alleys and garden paths on the road to your discovery. The question provides a tantalizing undercurrent to death and destruction in and around London. Join Holmes, Watson, and, of course, Lestrade as they team up to save the city and, perhaps, even the stability of nations. Now that I have discovered this series, there is no doubt I will be reading all of them.

  25. 4 out of 5

    D. Starr

    Who is "The Last Moriarty"? Suitable for middle school - adult No sex No harsh language Some action sequences include violence, but you see far worse on TV. Like the original Holmes stories, this one is written from Watson's point of view. It also includes explanations of how and why "The Hound of the Baskervilles" was written after Holmes supposedly died at Reichenbach Falls. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the original author, had always maintained that "Hound" was supposed to have taken place before Holme Who is "The Last Moriarty"? Suitable for middle school - adult No sex No harsh language Some action sequences include violence, but you see far worse on TV. Like the original Holmes stories, this one is written from Watson's point of view. It also includes explanations of how and why "The Hound of the Baskervilles" was written after Holmes supposedly died at Reichenbach Falls. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the original author, had always maintained that "Hound" was supposed to have taken place before Holmes's last encounter with his nemesis, Moriarty. I appreciate author Charles Veley's attention to this detail. Plot no spoilers: Surprising Watson, Holmes has reappeared years after his supposed death, and he asks Watson to keep it a secret that he is still alive. He has rejoined his old friend because he is aware of a plot to assassinate several well-known American millionaires who have come to England to make a deal that will undermine the political plans of power-hungry Germans. Holmes reveals who their opponent is: a ruthless criminal, whom they had encountered before and who is related to Moriarty. Soon thereafter, they meet Lucy James, a young performer. Guess who her daddy is. The game is afoot! At first I thought the story might be disappointingly slow, but I was wrong, once the introduction and set up is completed, the book is a page turner. Recommended.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leora

    If you're a huge fan of Sherlock Holmes, you'll revel in this re-creation. The characters you know and love -- Watson, LeStrade, Mrs. Hudson -- are all present. Watson plays the not-that-bright sidekick, now widowed and back with his first love, Sherlock. Real characters are used in a fictional way: John D. Rockefeller Sr. and Jr., Richard D'Oyly Carte, the founder of the Gilbert and Sullivan opera company. And deep secrets reveal themselves slowly, as the evil villains try to take over the worl If you're a huge fan of Sherlock Holmes, you'll revel in this re-creation. The characters you know and love -- Watson, LeStrade, Mrs. Hudson -- are all present. Watson plays the not-that-bright sidekick, now widowed and back with his first love, Sherlock. Real characters are used in a fictional way: John D. Rockefeller Sr. and Jr., Richard D'Oyly Carte, the founder of the Gilbert and Sullivan opera company. And deep secrets reveal themselves slowly, as the evil villains try to take over the world. If you read Arthur Conan Doyle as an adolescent, and have moved on to other literature, you'll remember the lack of intellectual challenge in the stories. The characters are stick figures. The revealed relationships are laughable. And the resolution smacks of American "action movies" involving guns and dynamite. I commend Charles Veley on his creation. But there are other books I'd rather read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Krystyna

    A wonderful tribute to Sherlock Holmes A terrific read. Homes is as enigmatic as ever but Watson seems not quite as in the dark as the original. The plot is very much in the style of the original stories even though Holmes seems a bit more open during the investigation rather than keeping things under wraps until the end. A plot of an escaped prisoner, a meeting between the Government and two American magnates, treachery, murder and the rise of Moriarty's organisation like a phoenix from the fla A wonderful tribute to Sherlock Holmes A terrific read. Homes is as enigmatic as ever but Watson seems not quite as in the dark as the original. The plot is very much in the style of the original stories even though Holmes seems a bit more open during the investigation rather than keeping things under wraps until the end. A plot of an escaped prisoner, a meeting between the Government and two American magnates, treachery, murder and the rise of Moriarty's organisation like a phoenix from the flames. Fueled by the anger of Moriarty's brother and the unwholesome pride in the family. Plus we learn of the love Holmes had for a young music teacher and the result. Can Holmes stop the plot funded by an enemy power? Can he ring down the organisation? Great pace throughout and the keeping within the period is wonderful. No straying. A pleasure to read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Randy Tramp

    London, 1895. An American actress visits 221B Baker Street, desperate for Sherlock Holmes to protect her. Holmes feels compelled to help her, but he's been asked to solve an urgent case. A close associate of John. D. Rockefeller has been murdered, and Holmes suspects it's an attempt to derail the upcoming British-American summit. Clues to the murder point directly to Professor Moriarty. To prevent an international disaster, Holmes must solve the mystery. As he races to find the true culprit, ano London, 1895. An American actress visits 221B Baker Street, desperate for Sherlock Holmes to protect her. Holmes feels compelled to help her, but he's been asked to solve an urgent case. A close associate of John. D. Rockefeller has been murdered, and Holmes suspects it's an attempt to derail the upcoming British-American summit. Clues to the murder point directly to Professor Moriarty. To prevent an international disaster, Holmes must solve the mystery. As he races to find the true culprit, another woman from his past, presents him with a mystery. Can Holmes protect the young actress, solve the riddle from his own past, and prevent chaos on both sides of the Atlantic? I love the "feel" of this book. Veley captured the world of Sherlock Holmes. Interesting plot and of course, super-great characters.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christa Saccullo

    HAPPY, HAPPY, HAPPY I am a HAPPY gal! I've read all the original Sherlock stories plus some spinoffs. This is definitely the BEST! I was gone within the first two chapters. Excellent plot! Plenty of historical feel Smooth, clean telling like the originals. Characters were perfectly played! Biggest point: Watson's voice was accurate. (Watson is a favorite of mine, so I appreciate when he's done right) I also enjoyed how smoothly Lucy was introduced and that she's a great character in her own way withou HAPPY, HAPPY, HAPPY I am a HAPPY gal! I've read all the original Sherlock stories plus some spinoffs. This is definitely the BEST! I was gone within the first two chapters. Excellent plot! Plenty of historical feel Smooth, clean telling like the originals. Characters were perfectly played! Biggest point: Watson's voice was accurate. (Watson is a favorite of mine, so I appreciate when he's done right) I also enjoyed how smoothly Lucy was introduced and that she's a great character in her own way without being forced into the story. And I was thrilled her mother wasn't Irene Adler! (Watson made it clear there was no romantic connection) For those who have read the original stories, there's plenty of nostalgic fun if you are paying attention. This book is definitely a win for me! Well done, sir, well done. Definitely will be collecting this series. Christa

  30. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    I enjoyed this one throughout. I won't recount the summary because so many other reviews on Goodreads have already done that job. Pleasurable comfort food as far as I'm concerned. Bear in mind that I'm not a Sherlock snob or purist. As long as the character is recognizable and there's a mystery afoot, I'm usually good to go! This one had a good pace and an exciting wrap up. The only shift here for Sherlock is that he has a past with with a lovely woman. I can deal with that. Definitely not the w I enjoyed this one throughout. I won't recount the summary because so many other reviews on Goodreads have already done that job. Pleasurable comfort food as far as I'm concerned. Bear in mind that I'm not a Sherlock snob or purist. As long as the character is recognizable and there's a mystery afoot, I'm usually good to go! This one had a good pace and an exciting wrap up. The only shift here for Sherlock is that he has a past with with a lovely woman. I can deal with that. Definitely not the worst distortion of Holmes I've seen. That distinction goes to Meyer for his The Adventure of the Peculiar Protocols, in which Holmes resorts to torture! (Yikes!) Some might quibble that Moriarty's backstory has been muddled and turned into soap-opera melodrama, but oh well. I still say it's a fun read!

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