counter create hit Everything Coming Out of Nothing vs. A Finite, Open and Contingent Universe - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Everything Coming Out of Nothing vs. A Finite, Open and Contingent Universe

Availability: Ready to download

Stephen Hawking, present occupant of the Lucasian Chair at Cambridge University, is today one of the best known theoretical cosmologists in the world. His important contributions, in collaboration with Roger Penrose, to the physics of black holes are well known, but this does not make his cotributions comparable to those of Albert Einstein, as some times is affirmed in the Stephen Hawking, present occupant of the Lucasian Chair at Cambridge University, is today one of the best known theoretical cosmologists in the world. His important contributions, in collaboration with Roger Penrose, to the physics of black holes are well known, but this does not make his cotributions comparable to those of Albert Einstein, as some times is affirmed in the mainstream media. In this book, Hawking´s work on "The boundary conditions of the universe"as presented at the Vatican Study Week on Astrophysical Cosmology (1981), his bestseller "A Brief History of Time" (1988), his lecture on "Gödel and the end of physics" (2002), and his latest book "The Grand Design"(2010) are briefly examined. In them many philosophical questions are raised but no rigorous answers are provided. In the second half of the book, chapters on the origin of science in the Christian West, the post-Renaissance scientific revolution, and the true pioneers of modern physics put contemporary cosmology in a proper perspective. The authors conclude that contemporary observational data are compatible with a finite, open and contingent universe, rather than with "everything coming out of nothing". This book puts it in a proper historical perspective, contrary to Hawking's: the universe is intelligible, as attested by the monumental fact of modern science,  it is contingent, and therefore created. Very often, contemporary theoretical cosmologists ignore the crucial contributions made in Medieval Europe to the birth of modern physics. This book is written  in accessible language for the non specialist.


Compare
Ads Banner

Stephen Hawking, present occupant of the Lucasian Chair at Cambridge University, is today one of the best known theoretical cosmologists in the world. His important contributions, in collaboration with Roger Penrose, to the physics of black holes are well known, but this does not make his cotributions comparable to those of Albert Einstein, as some times is affirmed in the Stephen Hawking, present occupant of the Lucasian Chair at Cambridge University, is today one of the best known theoretical cosmologists in the world. His important contributions, in collaboration with Roger Penrose, to the physics of black holes are well known, but this does not make his cotributions comparable to those of Albert Einstein, as some times is affirmed in the mainstream media. In this book, Hawking´s work on "The boundary conditions of the universe"as presented at the Vatican Study Week on Astrophysical Cosmology (1981), his bestseller "A Brief History of Time" (1988), his lecture on "Gödel and the end of physics" (2002), and his latest book "The Grand Design"(2010) are briefly examined. In them many philosophical questions are raised but no rigorous answers are provided. In the second half of the book, chapters on the origin of science in the Christian West, the post-Renaissance scientific revolution, and the true pioneers of modern physics put contemporary cosmology in a proper perspective. The authors conclude that contemporary observational data are compatible with a finite, open and contingent universe, rather than with "everything coming out of nothing". This book puts it in a proper historical perspective, contrary to Hawking's: the universe is intelligible, as attested by the monumental fact of modern science,  it is contingent, and therefore created. Very often, contemporary theoretical cosmologists ignore the crucial contributions made in Medieval Europe to the birth of modern physics. This book is written  in accessible language for the non specialist.

30 review for Everything Coming Out of Nothing vs. A Finite, Open and Contingent Universe

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Amazing read for anyone who has pondered how the universe came to exist and why there is something instead on nothing.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anil Pala

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mihai

  4. 5 out of 5

    Doctor

  5. 4 out of 5

    Writetotanteileon05outlook.Com

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cristina

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniela

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alex Schukin

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leanne

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Kemmerling

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christinesdreams

  12. 4 out of 5

    YK Toh

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alejandra

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alison West

  15. 5 out of 5

    Erick Guardado

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kunaal

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Young

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rohan

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Wiles

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nick van der Wildt

  22. 5 out of 5

    John

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nirnay Kumar

  24. 5 out of 5

    Percy Marquina

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rasmus Krøner

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nilavan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pushkar Singh

  28. 5 out of 5

    David

  29. 5 out of 5

    Madhur Ahuja

  30. 4 out of 5

    G

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.