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Negro Soy Yo: Hip Hop and Raced Citizenship in Neoliberal Cuba

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In Negro Soy Yo Marc D. Perry explores Cuba’s hip hop movement as a window into the racial complexities of the island’s ongoing transition from revolutionary socialism toward free-market capitalism. Centering on the music and lives of black-identified raperos (rappers), Perry examines the ways these young artists craft notions of black Cuban identity and racial citizenship In Negro Soy Yo Marc D. Perry explores Cuba’s hip hop movement as a window into the racial complexities of the island’s ongoing transition from revolutionary socialism toward free-market capitalism. Centering on the music and lives of black-identified raperos (rappers), Perry examines the ways these young artists craft notions of black Cuban identity and racial citizenship, along with calls for racial justice, at the fraught confluence of growing Afro-Cuban marginalization and long held perceptions of Cuba as a non-racial nation. Situating hip hop within a long history of Cuban racial politics, Perry discusses the artistic and cultural exchanges between raperos and North American rappers and activists, and their relationships with older Afro-Cuban intellectuals and African American political exiles. He also examines critiques of Cuban patriarchy by female raperos, the competing rise of reggaetón, as well as state efforts to incorporate hip hop into its cultural institutions. At this pivotal moment of Cuban-U.S. relations, Perry's analysis illuminates the evolving dynamics of race, agency, and neoliberal transformation amid a Cuba in historic flux. 


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In Negro Soy Yo Marc D. Perry explores Cuba’s hip hop movement as a window into the racial complexities of the island’s ongoing transition from revolutionary socialism toward free-market capitalism. Centering on the music and lives of black-identified raperos (rappers), Perry examines the ways these young artists craft notions of black Cuban identity and racial citizenship In Negro Soy Yo Marc D. Perry explores Cuba’s hip hop movement as a window into the racial complexities of the island’s ongoing transition from revolutionary socialism toward free-market capitalism. Centering on the music and lives of black-identified raperos (rappers), Perry examines the ways these young artists craft notions of black Cuban identity and racial citizenship, along with calls for racial justice, at the fraught confluence of growing Afro-Cuban marginalization and long held perceptions of Cuba as a non-racial nation. Situating hip hop within a long history of Cuban racial politics, Perry discusses the artistic and cultural exchanges between raperos and North American rappers and activists, and their relationships with older Afro-Cuban intellectuals and African American political exiles. He also examines critiques of Cuban patriarchy by female raperos, the competing rise of reggaetón, as well as state efforts to incorporate hip hop into its cultural institutions. At this pivotal moment of Cuban-U.S. relations, Perry's analysis illuminates the evolving dynamics of race, agency, and neoliberal transformation amid a Cuba in historic flux. 

28 review for Negro Soy Yo: Hip Hop and Raced Citizenship in Neoliberal Cuba

  1. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    I've read a number of interesting politics of hip hop books recently (see Dennis, Rivera) and this one fits in well. I wasn't as sure of the argument while I read it, but the intersections of race and hip hop and the political openings and unique aspects of the Cuban government have stuck with me since. It helps that I'm familiar with racial relations in Cuba as well as the broader literature on hip hop, but I'd recommend this. I've read a number of interesting politics of hip hop books recently (see Dennis, Rivera) and this one fits in well. I wasn't as sure of the argument while I read it, but the intersections of race and hip hop and the political openings and unique aspects of the Cuban government have stuck with me since. It helps that I'm familiar with racial relations in Cuba as well as the broader literature on hip hop, but I'd recommend this.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chi Chi

    Excellent look at the intersection of race, politics, and hip hop in Cuba.

  3. 4 out of 5

    K

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  5. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Baumgartner

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tara Ravi

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    Summer Behling

  8. 4 out of 5

    Boima Tucker

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    alex garcia

  10. 5 out of 5

    LT

  11. 5 out of 5

    Duke Press

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lucia Sonia

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  15. 5 out of 5

    bianca

  16. 5 out of 5

    Linita

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hilmar Hildar Magnúsarson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sjournee

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dina

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    F

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elise Brown

  22. 4 out of 5

    masha

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sayeed Sanchez

  24. 5 out of 5

    G

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Isnor

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joseph A Natarajan

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