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While millions of men died in France and Belgium in 1915, battles equally as large and bloody were being fought on the Eastern Front, as Imperial Germany, Hapsburg Austria-Hungary, and Tsarist Russia clashed on a scale greater than anything seen on the Western Front. These massive offensives were shocking in their scale and intensity, and hugely important. Yet they are lar While millions of men died in France and Belgium in 1915, battles equally as large and bloody were being fought on the Eastern Front, as Imperial Germany, Hapsburg Austria-Hungary, and Tsarist Russia clashed on a scale greater than anything seen on the Western Front. These massive offensives were shocking in their scale and intensity, and hugely important. Yet they are largely ignored in the West. Now, with the work of internationally renowned Eastern Front expert Prit Buttar, this story of the unknown side of World War I is finally being told. In Germany Ascendant, Buttar examines the critical year of 1915, when Germany launched the great Gorlice-Tarnow Offensive, lead by Field Marshal Mackensen. The move, which started as a minor German operation to relieve their Austro-Hungarian allies, ultimately resulted in the utter collapse of Russian forces from all of Poland and Gallacia, and came tantalizingly close to knocking Russia out of the war altogether. Next the Germans led the invasion of Serbia, leading Britain and France to intervene with ground troops, an operation that ultimately failed.   Yet despite this unbroken string of successes, Germany was still hamstrung by a two-front war. Her every attempt to knock Russia out of the war--military and diplomatic--has failed. The stage was then set for the next phase of the war when Russia launched its own counter-offensive that nearly brought the Central Powers to their knees.


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While millions of men died in France and Belgium in 1915, battles equally as large and bloody were being fought on the Eastern Front, as Imperial Germany, Hapsburg Austria-Hungary, and Tsarist Russia clashed on a scale greater than anything seen on the Western Front. These massive offensives were shocking in their scale and intensity, and hugely important. Yet they are lar While millions of men died in France and Belgium in 1915, battles equally as large and bloody were being fought on the Eastern Front, as Imperial Germany, Hapsburg Austria-Hungary, and Tsarist Russia clashed on a scale greater than anything seen on the Western Front. These massive offensives were shocking in their scale and intensity, and hugely important. Yet they are largely ignored in the West. Now, with the work of internationally renowned Eastern Front expert Prit Buttar, this story of the unknown side of World War I is finally being told. In Germany Ascendant, Buttar examines the critical year of 1915, when Germany launched the great Gorlice-Tarnow Offensive, lead by Field Marshal Mackensen. The move, which started as a minor German operation to relieve their Austro-Hungarian allies, ultimately resulted in the utter collapse of Russian forces from all of Poland and Gallacia, and came tantalizingly close to knocking Russia out of the war altogether. Next the Germans led the invasion of Serbia, leading Britain and France to intervene with ground troops, an operation that ultimately failed.   Yet despite this unbroken string of successes, Germany was still hamstrung by a two-front war. Her every attempt to knock Russia out of the war--military and diplomatic--has failed. The stage was then set for the next phase of the war when Russia launched its own counter-offensive that nearly brought the Central Powers to their knees.

30 review for Germany Ascendant: The Eastern Front 1915

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Alexander

    This is an excellent book for anyone looking into World War I, or for the general military history reader. Germany Ascendant covers a very important and criminally neglected part of WWI: the Eastern front, an epic war between the German, Austria-Hungarian, and Russian empires. I've found most English-language writing on WWI focuses overwhelmingly on the Western front. Which is just foolish, given that the Russian war was at least as important, not to mention bigger in scale. This book is the secon This is an excellent book for anyone looking into World War I, or for the general military history reader. Germany Ascendant covers a very important and criminally neglected part of WWI: the Eastern front, an epic war between the German, Austria-Hungarian, and Russian empires. I've found most English-language writing on WWI focuses overwhelmingly on the Western front. Which is just foolish, given that the Russian war was at least as important, not to mention bigger in scale. This book is the second of a series that helps fix that problem. Prit Buttar's first volume (my review) addressed events in 1914, which were extraordinary. Three huge armies clashed, and the results included one of WWI's most complete victories (the Battle of Tannenberg). In this sequel Buttar explores what happened next, through the year of 1915. 1915 saw Russia defeated, simply put. Germany, with not much help with its Austro-Hungarian ally, pushed the tsar's forces out of Poland and other areas. The very well planned Gorlice-Tarnow Offensive shattered the Russian line. In response to that and continuous Central Powers pressure the Russian command conducted the Great Retreat, after which it licked the wounds of a shrunken, undersupplied, and increasingly despairing army. That much I knew about, and so appreciated Buttar's excellent description in great, well sourced detail. He does a terrific job of laying out the decision-making process of each command structure. I didn't know about the spectacularly horrible, and failed, Austro-Hungarian winter offensive against the Russian army in early 1915, when Vienna sent exhausted, ill-led, and ill-trained forces against an enemy dug into mountains. Yeah, that went about as well as you might expect. (Check (this amazing photo from the Carpathian battles) I didn't know about another Austro-Hungarian disaster, the failed "Black-Yellow" offensive of fall 1915 (chapter 10). I've never seen the fall of Serbia described in such solid detail (chapter 13). I appreciated little scenes and stories which bring the time to life, especially given the sheer size and complexity of operations. For example, in a parallel to the classic Western front Christmas in the trenches, "Easter Sunday fell on 4 April, and on quiet sectors of the long Eastern Front soldiers from both sides exchange gifts" (152; also 175). Or this little character sketch:[Bulgarian Tsar Ferdinand was not] particularly enamored of the ruler of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, once describing Franz Joseph as 'that idiot, that old dotard.' In an era of haughty aristocracy, Ferdinand was a colorful figure, and annoyed [German Kaiser] Wilhelm by playfully slapping the kaiser on the bottom during a state visit... (367)Or in a classic piece of wartime black humor, Russian soldiers besieging the Austro-Hungarians within a vast fortress mocked the latter's desperate slaughter of their horses: "What is the difference between the heroes of Troy and those of Przemysl? In Troy, the warriors were in the belly of a horse, while in Przemysl, the horse is in the belly of the warriors!" (60) Or the spectacular fall of Vladimir Sukhomilov, who went from being Russia's minister of war during 1914-1915 to trial, prison, exile, and dying of exposure, homeless, on a Berlin bench (280). Or this desperate speech to troops, by a Serbian commander: "At precisely 3 pm, the enemy will be crushed by your fierce charge, destroyed by your grenades and bayonets... Our regiment has been sacrificed for the honor of Belgrade and the Fatherland. Therefore, you no longer need worry about your lives; they no longer exist. So forward to glory! Long live Belgrade!" (375) Once again I'm stunned by the sheer horror and human devastation the first World War brought about. "The [AH] Army lost nearly 1.8 million men on the Russian Front in 1915" (360). In one campaign we learn of a command starting off with "a little under 135,000 men; by the end of the first week of February, nearly 89,000 were dead, wounded, or prisoners." (77) A primary source describes German forces caught between freezing and starving to death: It drove you to despair, and there was no way out; we were threatened either by death, injury, and frozen limbs or by being taken captive. There was an incredible lack of courage among the soldiers, and it was only the terrible force of circumstances which fired us to bear it. (135) All three armies regularly killed civilians or took them as hostages (170, 387, etc.). And here's how one Austro-Hungarian leadership team envisioned occupying a defeated Balkan state:the Serbian intelligentsia was to be eliminated and the rest of the Serbian population reduced to peasantry, with the area resettled by German, Austrian, and Hungarian farmers. (387) And there is the horror, including anticipatory horror, in reading about antiSemitic acts carried out in these lands, especially by Russians. There's even this grim bit, when Central Powers forces recaptured a great fortress town from the retreating Russians: "In view of the history of Central Europe in the decades that followed, it is particularly striking that the residents of Przemysl who showed particular enthusiasm for the arrival of the Germans were the Jews."(230) Are there weaknesses in Germany Ascendant? Not really, given its carefully constructed scope and extensive work. I would have liked to see the war against Turkey integrated, but that really would double the book's size. Readers might want more diplomatic, social, or cultural history, but, again, this is a work of purely military history. Some reviewers have complained about too much detail, but I'm hungry for this stuff and devoured every paragraph. The only issue I had was that some of the maps were occasionally hard to work with. Most of the maps are very good, being clear and well connected to the text. Yet some are only half-page in size, and perhaps my eyeballs aren't what they used to be, but I needed close inspection under a bright light to work 'em. Some towns and rivers mentioned as key locations in the text didn't appear (unless I just missed them). Overall, this book did far, far better than most WWI books with maps. And the photos were much appreciated. Overall, a major contribution to the topic, and well worth the time of the WWI-interested reader. Military history buffs will also learn a great deal from Germany Ascendant. Prit Buttar provides powerful context for the rest of 1915, giving us essential history to lay alongside Gallipoli and the Second Battle of Ypres .

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    The second volume of Dr. Buttar's excellent series on the Eastern Front of the First World War, this book covers the various battles that took place in the Carpathians, Galicia, Lithuania, Volhynia, Central Poland and Serbia. All of these campaigns were Central Powers' victories, as depicted in the title, with the German Army taking center stage as the only true competent combatant in this region. The year 1915 saw a series of offensives that drove the Russian Army out of Poland but, as the Germ The second volume of Dr. Buttar's excellent series on the Eastern Front of the First World War, this book covers the various battles that took place in the Carpathians, Galicia, Lithuania, Volhynia, Central Poland and Serbia. All of these campaigns were Central Powers' victories, as depicted in the title, with the German Army taking center stage as the only true competent combatant in this region. The year 1915 saw a series of offensives that drove the Russian Army out of Poland but, as the German CGS Falkenhym consistently pointed out, it was impossible to destroy the Russian Army outright because of the vast spaces they could retreat into, Napoleon's Russian campaign was an everlasting warning to those who would attempt an invasion. Aside from the length of the front, the lack of roads and railroads in the region made it difficult to move and supply the enormous armies deployed by the combatants. All in all, a very thorough and professional history of the second year of the Ostfront in WWI. I am looking forward to reading the next volume.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rayrumtum

    This is the second of four volumes on the history of WWI on the Eastern front. In the West most attention is paid to the Western front which was quite different from the East. Unlike the stalemate in the West, the East was a war of maneuver. Many overall histories of WWI notice the East through the Battle of Tannenberg and then neglect it until Brusilov's offensive and the Russian revolution. Yet in 1915, the scope of this book, there were many extremely bloody battles. The description of the wi This is the second of four volumes on the history of WWI on the Eastern front. In the West most attention is paid to the Western front which was quite different from the East. Unlike the stalemate in the West, the East was a war of maneuver. Many overall histories of WWI notice the East through the Battle of Tannenberg and then neglect it until Brusilov's offensive and the Russian revolution. Yet in 1915, the scope of this book, there were many extremely bloody battles. The description of the winter fighting in the Carpathian mountains left me with the question of how anyone could have survived, Indeed although the Central Powers were successful in 1915 because they had Russia on the run, but lengthy supply lines prohibited them from pursuing a defeated enemy and closing out that front. There is a lot of new information in this book and it is well-researched. However, at times the prose seems somewhat dense. There are many maps but they are way too small to read. Hence, the reader flies through the battles with a limited sense of the geography.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Logan Fort

    Germany Ascendant Osprey Publishing,2017,488 pp.,$18.00 Prit Buttar ISBN 978-1-4728-1937-6 Logan Fort, 8th Grade Pennridge South Middle School Perkasie PA In 1914 the great war has just begun on two fronts; the east and west. The book Germany Ascendant is about the lesser known eastern front. In the east, Russia is facing off an invasion from the Germans and the Hungarians. Germany has much success in the north but the Hungarians face fierce resistance in the south. Germany and Hungary are Germany Ascendant Osprey Publishing,2017,488 pp.,$18.00 Prit Buttar ISBN 978-1-4728-1937-6 Logan Fort, 8th Grade Pennridge South Middle School Perkasie PA In 1914 the great war has just begun on two fronts; the east and west. The book Germany Ascendant is about the lesser known eastern front. In the east, Russia is facing off an invasion from the Germans and the Hungarians. Germany has much success in the north but the Hungarians face fierce resistance in the south. Germany and Hungary are allied to fight Russia. The book explains the deterioration of events over time that eventually leads to the end of the war in the east. The book is a nonfiction informative book set on describing the events surrounding the eastern front in World War One. The book has no sequel nor a prequel and it is not a part of a series. I noticed that the book is very descriptive in the brutalness of the battles and the tension between high powered commanders who all want to go their own way. I thought that this book had a bit too much detail, which unnecessarily lengthens the book. At times I felt bored as I read the book, but I was also surprised and deeply invested in the book. The book is nonfiction so there are no themes to be seen. I would recommend this book to people who have a deep interest in World War One and those who have a decent vocabulary. This book would be appropriate for someone who is 14 years and older. The author of the book Germany Ascendant is Prit Buttar. Prit studied medicine at Oxford and London and later joined the British army. He has appeared on local and national TV and radio. The writing has a rich vocabulary and is filled with over-the-top juicy details. I haven’t seen a book written like this before so I can’t make any comparisons. Do you think you would enjoy this type of historical book? The author uses a third person voice in his writing. The author occasionally flashes back to explain the decisions made that got to the current events. I would recommend this book to anyone who is willing to sit for awhile and learn about the eastern front in World War One.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John

    The Eastern Front in World War One is often overlooked in favour of the Western Front, at least if you are British. Tannenberg is fairly well known, but aside from that only really the Brusilov Offensive of 1916 and the Revolution of 1917 make much of an impression. As a result of this ignorance, Prit Buttar's four volume history of the war on the Eastern Front, of which this is the second, is to be welcomed. Collision of Empires was excellent but this, because it deals with less well known even The Eastern Front in World War One is often overlooked in favour of the Western Front, at least if you are British. Tannenberg is fairly well known, but aside from that only really the Brusilov Offensive of 1916 and the Revolution of 1917 make much of an impression. As a result of this ignorance, Prit Buttar's four volume history of the war on the Eastern Front, of which this is the second, is to be welcomed. Collision of Empires was excellent but this, because it deals with less well known events, is even better. 1915 was the year the Russians were almost knocked out of the war, when Mackensen made a name for himself as a general, when the Russian army recovered from the catastrophes of early summer well enough to thrash the Austro-Hungarian army late in the season, and when Serbia was finally crushed. I look forward to the remaining two volumes of this excellent endeavour.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike Nesemann

    WWI’s Eastern Front had remained a lamentable area of ignorance on my part so I looked forward to Dr Buttar’s 4 book series. Typically, I blundered and read the second book (1915) first. Whoops. Anyway, first the negatives. I have never understood the Brits’ approach to maps. Inevitably there will be repeated references to some town or feature, which doesn’t appear on any of the maps. Also, his enumerating the specific division involved in particular actions was excessive for me and slowed down WWI’s Eastern Front had remained a lamentable area of ignorance on my part so I looked forward to Dr Buttar’s 4 book series. Typically, I blundered and read the second book (1915) first. Whoops. Anyway, first the negatives. I have never understood the Brits’ approach to maps. Inevitably there will be repeated references to some town or feature, which doesn’t appear on any of the maps. Also, his enumerating the specific division involved in particular actions was excessive for me and slowed down the flow of the book. But that is a very personal objection, and I would imagine I would be shouted down by the vast majority of serious military historians. Those same military historians would enjoy this book but I also think the general reader would as well. WWI was such an epochal event with such continuing resonance that it seems a worthy area of at least some reading and Dr. Buttar’s book(s) is (are) thoroughly researched and informative. In the space of 4 years, 4 well established dynasties were swept away; the Hapsburg (600 years), Hohenzollern (500 years), the Romanov (300), and the Ottoman (600). The casualties were unimaginable to us. By my calculations, were the US to suffer proportionately the same casualties as the Austrian-Hungarians and Germans in 1915 alone, our numbers would be over 17 million!!! And the incompetence and sheer idiocy of the leaders is equally stupefying, e.g., the Russian logistics were so bad that one estimate had over 300,000 men on the Southwestern Front without rifles, resulting in some attacks launched with grenades and clubs. One Russian Army Commander’s relationship with his Chief of Staff was so bad that they only communicated by written notes, even when in the same room! And the Austrian Chief of Staff’s astonishing indifference to his army’s casualties defies reason. The scale of the slaughter is depressing, but the explanation of the political situation(s) and repercussions is excellent, and I look forward to the other three books, especially the final book which covers up to and beyond the official end of the way, e.g., 1918 – 1925.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brian Curran

    Germany Ascendant: The Eastern Front 1915 by Prit Buttar is an essential and long time coming addition to the study of the First World War. The Eastern Front is often over looked as the "real"action on the Western Front has occupied historians for many decades. In this the second volume of his exhaustive study of the battles of the Eastern Front, Buttar illuminates the politics, strategy and tragedy of the armies of Russia, Germany, and Austria Hungary as they staggered to find their military fo Germany Ascendant: The Eastern Front 1915 by Prit Buttar is an essential and long time coming addition to the study of the First World War. The Eastern Front is often over looked as the "real"action on the Western Front has occupied historians for many decades. In this the second volume of his exhaustive study of the battles of the Eastern Front, Buttar illuminates the politics, strategy and tragedy of the armies of Russia, Germany, and Austria Hungary as they staggered to find their military footing after the opening action of 1914. The devastating Carpathian winter campaign of 1915, Mackensen's breakthrough of the Russian line, the abandonment of Poland and ultimately the great retreat of the Russian army, pushed all of the forces to nearly the breaking point. Buttar emphasises the importance of the Eastern Front and the profound effects it had on the action in the west, as Germany sought desperately to deliver a blow strong enough to force Russia out of the war in order to concentrate all of its strength on France. As on the Western Front, the enormous casualties in 1915 also precipitated the transformation of the combatants armies from professional forces lead by aristocrats and career officers to forces made up largely of conscripts lead by newly minted officers drawn from the middle classes. The consequences of this shift would begin to put pressure on the already fragile Austrian and Russian Empires, creating political tremors just as their armies were beginning to recover at the start of 1916. Buttar's Germany Ascendant: is an exceptional though traditional history book. While level of military minutiae will most likely put the casual reader off, those who wish to immerse themselves in this little explored and thoroughly fascinating theatre of WWI will be rewarded for their endurance.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bob Willis

    Excellent book. Little slow getting started and understanding the different leaders and units involved. Having read several books on WW-I, all on the western front and the Gallipoli Campaign, I was struck by the amount of death and hardship on Eastern Front. Great book for a different perspective on WW-I.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    A well-researched but occasionally dry primer that does what it seeks to do. I appreciated, in particular, the work done to understand the Austro-Hungarian approach to the war: the author comes out deeply criticizing Austro-Hungarian strategy and Conrad von Hotzendorf in general, something that feels long, long overdue among mainstream military history of World War I.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Deep, fascinating mostly higher-level (generals' eyes) view of the war but one that doesn't ignore the conflict's cost to civilians in the occupied territories, or the effects of the heavy losses on the combatants.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

    Solid History of War on Eastern Front during WW 1.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joe Collins

    For serious readers of history. It cover 1915 on the Eastern Front of the Great War.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Firstly, thank you to the publisher and Net Galley for the opportunity to review this book in return for an honest review. I have mixed feelings about this book, which I picked up because I was interested in seeing something of "the other side" of the story. As the saying goes, history is written by the victor. The book recounts a year in the lives of the combatants in the first world war - specifically 1915 - with a heavy emphasis on the Eastern Front. It does a good job of interweaving often-ban Firstly, thank you to the publisher and Net Galley for the opportunity to review this book in return for an honest review. I have mixed feelings about this book, which I picked up because I was interested in seeing something of "the other side" of the story. As the saying goes, history is written by the victor. The book recounts a year in the lives of the combatants in the first world war - specifically 1915 - with a heavy emphasis on the Eastern Front. It does a good job of interweaving often-banal recounting of troop manoeuvres and political machinations in with quotes and anecdotes from the people who were on the ground. After reading a number of books on the First World War, I have come to the conclusion that it is only by some miracle that anyone won the war, and this book supports this view. I feel like this was really a book of two halves. The first half of the book I really struggled through, finding it more than a little tedious at times. I found myself asking "How do you make war boring?" - as a lover of history, and someone intensely fascinated by war - it should have been right in my wheelhouse, but I just struggled to get through it. The second half of the book was much more free-flowing, and I found myself more engaged by the author. To quote Austin Powers "But what does it all mean Basil?" I think this was my biggest dislike about the book, and maybe it was never intended to answer the bigger question. By focusing on a specific time period within the broader context of the war, it is difficult to assign weight, or importance to the events which are being described within. There is a relatively short denouement at the end of the book, which assists in understanding the context in the nations which were involved in the conflict. All in all, I found it a decent read, and it certainly contributes some variety to the literature on World War 1, covering an aspect of the war which I had not encountered in such detail elsewhere in my readings.

  14. 5 out of 5

    patrick Lorelli

    This is an excellent book about WWI and mainly the Eastern front which is normally just a passing reference. More books are written about the Western front, but the stories are tragic and in some cases horrific. You are taken through not only destruction of armies, but of towns, people, and how anti-Semitic was going on back then by both sides. You are taken through the failures of the Germans Generals to take advantage of breakthrough that they have accomplished only to be pushed back by more f This is an excellent book about WWI and mainly the Eastern front which is normally just a passing reference. More books are written about the Western front, but the stories are tragic and in some cases horrific. You are taken through not only destruction of armies, but of towns, people, and how anti-Semitic was going on back then by both sides. You are taken through the failures of the Germans Generals to take advantage of breakthrough that they have accomplished only to be pushed back by more fighting, and how some of their planning actually lead to more men being killed or captured. You can see really that Russia was on the verge of collapse and being out of the war but the advantages that were gained were never followed. Also because of tactical mistakes Russia not only stayed around but within two years would have their own revolution and I wonder if maybe that might not have happened. Just my thought. Overall a very good book my only complaint was the maps, but overall the book and content were excellent. I got this book from netgalley. I gave it 5 stars. Follow us at www.1rad-readerreviews.com

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris Buckham

    Title: Germany Ascendant: The Eastern Front 1915 Author: Prit Buttar ISBN: 978-1-4728-0795-3 Publisher: Osprey Publishing Year: 2015 Hardcover Pages: 448 Photos/maps: 30/20 Buttar’s book is a comprehensive study of the horrors of the Eastern Front as the First World War settled into its second year. One is struck by the wanton loss of life, the vast difference in strategic vision and the huge gaps in the quality of training and leadership. Despite some minor editorial issues and maps that could have bee Title: Germany Ascendant: The Eastern Front 1915 Author: Prit Buttar ISBN: 978-1-4728-0795-3 Publisher: Osprey Publishing Year: 2015 Hardcover Pages: 448 Photos/maps: 30/20 Buttar’s book is a comprehensive study of the horrors of the Eastern Front as the First World War settled into its second year. One is struck by the wanton loss of life, the vast difference in strategic vision and the huge gaps in the quality of training and leadership. Despite some minor editorial issues and maps that could have been of a higher quality given the complexity of the operations, his book reads very well and is a balanced account of the challenges of allied operations, grand strategy and above all else, the valour of the soldiers themselves. His narrative is full of excellent lessons for the commanders of today

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bill V

    Having read the previous book in this series, Collision of Empires, I think this book is better written than the other. The author has improved his writing skills making the narrative easier to follow. Some of the same deficiencies remain from the other title such as the maps are too small to adequately read or understand (although there are many of them). Another minor annoying problem from the previous book that continues in this one is that the majority of the conversions of miles to kilometer Having read the previous book in this series, Collision of Empires, I think this book is better written than the other. The author has improved his writing skills making the narrative easier to follow. Some of the same deficiencies remain from the other title such as the maps are too small to adequately read or understand (although there are many of them). Another minor annoying problem from the previous book that continues in this one is that the majority of the conversions of miles to kilometers the book provides are wrong, although the errors are about 1-2 kilometers off so it's not too bad. Given the dearth of books discussing the east front in World War I, I strongly recommend the title. It covers a neglected aspect of the war.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elle Christensen

    I am a huge fan of this historical period in our history and love reading non-fiction about it. This book has a wealth of information, so much of in incredibly interesting. It's well written, and researched. It had its moments where it was a little too dry, and some where I felt a little overwhelmed with the amount of information. However, I wasn't confused, as everything was explained pretty well. The backgrounds and ideas behind the actions of any participant in the war are fascinating to me. I am a huge fan of this historical period in our history and love reading non-fiction about it. This book has a wealth of information, so much of in incredibly interesting. It's well written, and researched. It had its moments where it was a little too dry, and some where I felt a little overwhelmed with the amount of information. However, I wasn't confused, as everything was explained pretty well. The backgrounds and ideas behind the actions of any participant in the war are fascinating to me. I enjoyed the perspective on the information as well and didn't feel as though it was tainted by opinion. Though, no book is without the author's take, even just a little. I would recommend this book if you are a fan of non-fiction, particularity the WWII era.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Excellent. There is nothing out there written in the English language that details the eastern front of World War I like this. A large void in history is filled and the author is commended for filling this void. I look forward to reading volume 3.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Definitely worth it. Very well put together, and informative. The delivery seemed a bit dry, for my tastes, though... I would still recommend for the information contained, therein.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Steve Switzer

    Volume 2 in Prit buttars excellent ww1 on the eastern front series. All his books are classics and this is no exception if you want to know ww1 in the east here you go !

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bruno Di Giandomenico

    1915 on the east front Very well written and detailed recounts of the war among Russia from one side and Germany and Austria-Hungary from the other.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mark Merritt

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fantom

  24. 5 out of 5

    James

  25. 5 out of 5

    Doug

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Kimmel

  27. 4 out of 5

    William D Tometich

  28. 4 out of 5

    Norman Smith

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mike Kennedy

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