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Daughter Of Earth And Water: A Biography Of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

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This remarkable biography follows the passionate relationship between Mary and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Percy was a celebrated poet, while Mary Shelley terrified the world with her novel Frankenstein — and their marriage was marked by both tragedy and brilliance.


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This remarkable biography follows the passionate relationship between Mary and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Percy was a celebrated poet, while Mary Shelley terrified the world with her novel Frankenstein — and their marriage was marked by both tragedy and brilliance.

30 review for Daughter Of Earth And Water: A Biography Of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

  1. 5 out of 5

    Clif Hostetler

    Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly (1797–1851) is best known today as the author of Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus . Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft. At age seventeen Mary eloped with Percy Bysshe Shelley who was already married to another woman. Mary was pregnant with Percy's child when they returned from their elopement (child did not survive a premature birth). This was considered scandalous by so Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly (1797–1851) is best known today as the author of Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus . Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft. At age seventeen Mary eloped with Percy Bysshe Shelley who was already married to another woman. Mary was pregnant with Percy's child when they returned from their elopement (child did not survive a premature birth). This was considered scandalous by society and they faced ostracism, constant debt. They married in late 1816, after the suicide of Percy Shelley's first wife. Divorce wasn't an option in those days. That was a rough start for the couple. However, their relationship endured and Mary matured into a stabilizing influence on both her husband and father. The following excerpt from the book provides a summary description of the maturation of Mary after dealing with the death of two of her children, William and Clara, and the patience she demonstrated while dealing with her husband and father. The death of William and Clara followed by the birth of Percy Florence had completed a process of Mary's maturation. Her husband was still an emotional adolescent in spite of his brilliance, frequently took refuge in psychosomatic illness, and used imagined incidents as an excuse for his erratic behavior. But Mary achieved life long stability by the time she reached her twenty-third birthday. She had learned to curb the melancholia that she had inherited from her mother. She had claimed a remarkable understanding of human nature, and she had gained enough self control to permit reason to guide her feelings. Her teachers were her father and her husband neither of whom was able to practice what he taught. Godwin stifled his emotions until they took command and forced him to behave irrationally, even stupidly. While Shelly who was so complex that he almost defied analysis released his feelings through regressions that denied the validity of the rule of reason that he preached. Mary gave into neither of these impulses. She had coped with her father since infancy and her husband's since adolescence. For their sakes she had accepted their prejudices, catered to their whims, and allowed their desires to take precedence over her own. Loving them she had done everything in her power to advance their careers, to enhance their reputations at the expense of her own. Sensitive to their genius she had catered to them allowing their whims to stand in the way of her own progress. She knew that Godwin's ambitions for her were unrealistic and consequently he never praised her. Shelly on the other hand always encouraged her but treated her like a tutor dealing with a pupil. Neither man no matter how loudly he preached the doctrine of equality was willing to admit that she was his peer. Knowing the limitations of her husband and her father, Mary did not expect the impossible from them. By the time she was twenty-three she had achieved an understanding that not only enabled her to admire their strengths and pity their weaknesses, but demanded from society, if not from them, what she so freely gave to them. She would be forced to overcome a series of crises including the tragic premature death of her husband before she would obtain the freedom and recognition that she deserved. Yet she seemed content to advance one small step at a time. It seems like every time Shelly wrote a poem that was about a woman it caused rumors to spread that he was having an extramarital affair. The following excerpt discusses how their relationship dealt with the rumors:The significance of the Amelia Viviani episode seen in exclusively personal terms is that Mary sensibly did not allow her husband's sympathy for the girl or the writing of Epipsychidion to influence their marital relationship. It is true that both of the Shelly's sometime suffered from a sense of inadequacy. Shelly apparently feeling that his intellect might be inferior to his wife's, while Mary occasionally believed that she was too undemonstrative for his needs. In the main, however, each felt secure in the other's love. Mary was annoyed now an again by the reactions of outsiders to her husband's relationship with Amelia, but her ire did not include him. And it did not occur to Shelly, who was far less sensible than his wife, that Mary might feel even a twinge of jealousy over the feelings he expressed in the poem that made Amelia Viviani immortal. He and Mary loved over each other in real life, and her understanding gave him the poetic license to indulge in his imaginative fancy in his work.Mary was obviously an intelligent and gifted woman who lived in a social circle that brought her into contact with some of the leading intellectuals of the era. It is also apparent that some her closest intimates had problematic personality quirks. Through it all Mary, as described in this book, comes across in many instances as the only "grown-up" person in the room. It seems like everybody in the book had money problems. Shelly was from a wealthy family and received a regular allowance, but he was always in debt because all his friends needed financial help. Mary played a role in trying to bring this outflow of money under control. This book was originally published in hardcover in 1972. It was not targeted to a scholarly audience thus it contains no endnotes or footnotes. It does contain a bibliography which is now forty-four years old.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ✨Sumi's Books✨

    This book is extremely matter-of-fact in the way that it is written. I think that many people would find the style of writing to be very boring. Thank goodness the author did not start making lists and/or timelines for the reader. However besides the way that the facts are presented, it is clearly obvious that the author did their research on this subject. I loved the way he even quoted the historical figures (from actual historical documentation) mentioned throughout this book. I appreciated th This book is extremely matter-of-fact in the way that it is written. I think that many people would find the style of writing to be very boring. Thank goodness the author did not start making lists and/or timelines for the reader. However besides the way that the facts are presented, it is clearly obvious that the author did their research on this subject. I loved the way he even quoted the historical figures (from actual historical documentation) mentioned throughout this book. I appreciated that factor quite a bit. I did have a bit of an issue keeping my attention on the book because of this writing style. I would recommend that you truly want to know more about Mary Shelley and the aspects of her life and the people around her in her life before picking up this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lilisa

    A fascinating, well-written and absorbing biography of Mary Shelley, it’s equally about her famous husband Percy Bysshe Shelley and the unconventional lives they led -- for the times they lived in. The personal and financial challenges they faced or, quite frankly, brought upon themselves were incredible and it’s a wonder they survived despite the constant creditors at their door. Brilliant in her own right, Mary’s intellectual capacity was equal to or superior than her husband’s and she was a s A fascinating, well-written and absorbing biography of Mary Shelley, it’s equally about her famous husband Percy Bysshe Shelley and the unconventional lives they led -- for the times they lived in. The personal and financial challenges they faced or, quite frankly, brought upon themselves were incredible and it’s a wonder they survived despite the constant creditors at their door. Brilliant in her own right, Mary’s intellectual capacity was equal to or superior than her husband’s and she was a successful writer in her own right. Her love and understanding of the complex personality that was Percy Bysshe Shelley helped ground and encourage him as a writer and poet. Bertram also vividly captures the personalities of Mary, her father, and the rest of the family and the demands they put on her. A woman who knew her own mind, she loved long walks, nature, literary discussion, reading and writing and she and her husband were soulmates in that regard. The biography is extremely well done – it was interesting, engaging, well researched and a page-turner to boot – a great read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I loved this book. Percy Shelley was of almost no interest to me and my opinion of him did not improve much. I almost did not read Mary's biography but so very glad I did. Mary was amazing - not just for her time but in general. I was blown away by her genius. She may be one of my top 10 women role models of all time from biographies I have read. Noel Bertram did a wonderful job of bringing Mary's voice through (it helped she was such a prolific writer) and to methodically debunk myths about her I loved this book. Percy Shelley was of almost no interest to me and my opinion of him did not improve much. I almost did not read Mary's biography but so very glad I did. Mary was amazing - not just for her time but in general. I was blown away by her genius. She may be one of my top 10 women role models of all time from biographies I have read. Noel Bertram did a wonderful job of bringing Mary's voice through (it helped she was such a prolific writer) and to methodically debunk myths about her. Her strength of character and conviction to set her mind to overcoming poverty, depression, loss, and to basically disregard the fact that women were not even supposed to read much less write left a permanent impression. It showed her personal triumph over her circumstances with little help. Mary was nothing if not self reliant. Her unique points of view transcend her time in history and her commitment to deeply educate herself as an end in itself inspired me. I am writing this review because Mary would not have approved of reading a book without writing about it and I highlighted many passages to journal about later. Thank you Mr Bertram for writing this book ... after Mary got over her dismay at not being able to write it herself, I think she would have approved! And while she did not consider herself a "feminist" as she perceived them to be during her lifetime (rabble-rousing suffragettes!) she profoundly inspired me to be truer to myself which was powerful and an act of empowerment I won't forget.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tam May

    I'll admit that I went into reading this book with a bit of a lukewarm attitude. Although I'm always interested in 19th century women writers, I don't know as much about the writers in the earlier part of the century as I do in the mid or later part. All I really knew about Mary Shelley was that she wrote "Frankenstein" (a book I like but wouldn't put on my top 10 list of favorite books) and that her mother was Mary Wollstonecraft. However, this biography was a pleasant surprise. Mary Shelley wa I'll admit that I went into reading this book with a bit of a lukewarm attitude. Although I'm always interested in 19th century women writers, I don't know as much about the writers in the earlier part of the century as I do in the mid or later part. All I really knew about Mary Shelley was that she wrote "Frankenstein" (a book I like but wouldn't put on my top 10 list of favorite books) and that her mother was Mary Wollstonecraft. However, this biography was a pleasant surprise. Mary Shelley was the Romantic era version of a badass chick, no question about it. She had the rare ability to do what she thought was right without being selfish about it. She went through a lot of trials and tribulations but she managed to support her only son when Percy B. Shelley died on her writing and regain the respect she lost when she married him (why that was is a spoiler I won't reveal). Throughout her life she remained optimistic and true to her beliefs. I really came to admire her in this biography. What was perhaps even more surprising to me was that I came to admire Percy B. as well. I won't lie - I was expecting to read about a self-absorbed, selfish though genius poet who expected everyone to bow down to him. But Percy B., though he could be sometimes flighty and impractical, was clearly a compassionate, giving man who cared deeply for his wife and family and gave as much as he got (in a good way). I ended up liking him (which is more than I can say for William Goodwin, Shelley's father, and Lord Byron, both of whom figured prominently in Shelley's life). The only reason I give the book 4 instead of 5 stars is because I felt sometimes that there were speculations made about Shelley's life for which evidence (as from letters or Shelley's journals) was lacking. I get that there may not have been much research to go on, since documentation wasn't as diligent in earlier times, but I would have liked to have seen a little more backing up of some of the points about Shelley's life. But this is definitely worth a read, especially for those interested in women writers of the past.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Burton

    I downloaded a copy of this biography of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley by Noel Gerson when I saw it advertised in an Endeavour Press e-mail newsletter last year. The book was first published in the 1970s and has now been re-released as an ebook. I thought it made an interesting companion to Glorious Apollo, the novel about Byron I read recently, as there are crossovers where Byron and the Shelley's lives intertwined. It is also perfect timing for me to read this book now as the Endeavour Press vir I downloaded a copy of this biography of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley by Noel Gerson when I saw it advertised in an Endeavour Press e-mail newsletter last year. The book was first published in the 1970s and has now been re-released as an ebook. I thought it made an interesting companion to Glorious Apollo, the novel about Byron I read recently, as there are crossovers where Byron and the Shelley's lives intertwined. It is also perfect timing for me to read this book now as the Endeavour Press virtual Historical Fiction Festival is taking place this week (18th - 22nd April 2016). Gerson obviously did a lot of research for Daughter Of Earth And Water so was able to both describe many aspects of her life and to discount theories put forward in previous works. She talks about the inspiration for and writing of Frankenstein (I really must read that one day!) as well as Mary's other novels, stories, translations and poetry. I had no idea that she was such an accomplished and intellectual author, easily the equal of her poet husband. Gerson goes into detail about the scandal of the Shelley's early pre-marriage relationship and the philosophical influence of Mary's father, William Godwin, which enabled her to live such a relatively free life for a woman at that time. I was amazed at, and little jealous of, their extensive European travels, especially as everyone seemed to be permanently on the verge of bankruptcy, but the tragedies they endured would try anyone's sanity. Gerson's writing style is a little dated as is to be expected and the book is let down by frequent typos which I think are caused by automated reading of faded print in an original copy. Mary's friend Tom Medwin gets renamed Toni Medwin, and letters often start with 'my clear'. None of the typos make the book difficult to understand, but the carelessness is distracting and all the instances would be easy to catch and correct if the final copy had been proofread. See more of my book reviews on my, Stephanie Jane

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lucile

    Daughter of Earth and Water: A Biography of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley by Gerson Noel Bertram is a must read! Since our book club is rereading Frankenstein by Mary Shelley the biography seemed a natural companion. I'm glad I got to know Mary Shelley beyond her monster. I knew very little about Mary beyond her relationship with Shelley and associations with his friend Lord Byron. I remembered hearing that her monster story grew out of a challenge to write a scary story. While the men lost interes Daughter of Earth and Water: A Biography of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley by Gerson Noel Bertram is a must read! Since our book club is rereading Frankenstein by Mary Shelley the biography seemed a natural companion. I'm glad I got to know Mary Shelley beyond her monster. I knew very little about Mary beyond her relationship with Shelley and associations with his friend Lord Byron. I remembered hearing that her monster story grew out of a challenge to write a scary story. While the men lost interested Mary took the challenge to heart. I didn't even know if I had heard the truth or a literary hoax. After reading "Daughter of Earth and Water" I feel as though I know Mary Shelley the woman, and the writer. A month ago I didn't know if she ever wrote anything else, let alone the titles. I now understand how her Mother's legacy and her father's inattention helped to shape her. Her deep love for Shelley and immense efforts to promote his writing, even beyond his grave, are evident in her pursuit for his fame. As I read Frankenstein again this fall I will see Mary Shelly, an outcast for daring to love a married man. I will see the Mary Shelly who lost so many people in her life. And, I will see the Mary Shelley who gave so much more to the literary world than I had ever imagined.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    This is a thoroughly enjoyable biography of Mary Shelley and is just what a good biography should be - well-written, accessible, meticulously researched, not too overloaded with extraneous detail and always entertaining. Highly recommended

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lauralee

    Mary Shelley is one of England’s beloved writers, whose famous work of Frankenstein has lived in popular culture since the day it was published and has never been out of print. However, aside that she wrote Frankenstein, and she married Percy Bysshe Shelley, I really did not know anything about her personal life. This fascinating biography not only recounts her fascinating life and her accomplishments, but it is she who helped make Percy Bysshe Shelley from a minor poet into a classic figure who Mary Shelley is one of England’s beloved writers, whose famous work of Frankenstein has lived in popular culture since the day it was published and has never been out of print. However, aside that she wrote Frankenstein, and she married Percy Bysshe Shelley, I really did not know anything about her personal life. This fascinating biography not only recounts her fascinating life and her accomplishments, but it is she who helped make Percy Bysshe Shelley from a minor poet into a classic figure whose works we know and love today. I did not know this, but Mary Shelley's early life was scandalous. She met Percy Shelley, who was already married, at fifteen. Eventually, they had a romantic affair and ran away to Europe with her stepsister, Claire, that shocked the eyes and and was condemned by England including their families. While their relationship was scandalous, the two remained faithful to each other and eventually married. They were a good match for each other for they were intellectual equals and understood and supported each other. I felt that this was a very well-written and comprehensive biography. The author focuses more on Mary Shelley's personal life and her emotional struggles. I like how it discusses her strained relationship with her family. This biography also dispels the myths of Percy Shelley's infidelities, including his relationship with Emilia and Jane Williams. The author said that these relationships were not romantic but rather platonic. He focused on spiritual love, and they served as models of his poetry. He was still faithful and loyal to Mary Shelley. Overall, this biography gives us a human portrait of the mastermind behind Frankenstein. While her life is filled with tragedy, she overcomes it to become a successful author. After the death of her husband, she continues to work hard to make sure that her husband and works were never forgotten. Daughter of Earth and Water chronicles Mary’s life, her love, and her accomplishments as she faces many obstacles and tragedies. She has also met and been acquainted with many famous poets of her age, including Lord Byron. I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the Romantic era, and about this fascinating woman whose works continue to inspire and captivate many readers to this day. (Note: I read an ARC copy of this novel in courtesy of Netgalley.)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    This is a fabulous biography of Mary Shelley. I read everything I can about her fiction and non fiction.. This is not your bland and boring biography . It is a page turning engrossing book. I was surprised to learn that Mary And Percy disapproved of Byron's behavior. i always thought it made no difference . this is a must read for Shelley fans

  11. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    I grabbed this slightly older book during my Kindle Unlimited trial. It was pleasant to read and predates the idea that Mary and Shelley were dishonest fakers in everything they wrote and everything they did. I confess I like this interpretation much better. An exceptional woman no matter how you look at her.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Wendie Schneider

    Interesting read I have always lived Shelley's poetry and wondered about his life with Mary. This book certainly demonstrates real love and devotion, not often seen among the celebrated.

  13. 5 out of 5

    The FountainPenDiva, Old school geek chick and lover of teddy bears

    Definitely a must read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kenya Starflight

    Having read Frankenstein earlier this year -- and while not my favorite classic, I can definitely appreciate its status as one of the first science-fiction books to win popular acclaim -- I figured I should learn a little more about the woman behind the infamous novel. As it turns out, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was a passionate woman whose own story was just as dramatic as her famous novel. And while "Daughter of Earth and Water" can drag a little at points, it's a well-researched and fascinat Having read Frankenstein earlier this year -- and while not my favorite classic, I can definitely appreciate its status as one of the first science-fiction books to win popular acclaim -- I figured I should learn a little more about the woman behind the infamous novel. As it turns out, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was a passionate woman whose own story was just as dramatic as her famous novel. And while "Daughter of Earth and Water" can drag a little at points, it's a well-researched and fascinating account of an equally fascinating woman. Noel Gerson's novel covers Shelley's entire life, but focuses mainly on her teenage and young-adult years -- arguably the pivotal years of her life. Mary championed her father's philosophy of living with passion and pursuing education and learning, but also lived a life of scandal by eloping with a married man (the poet Shelley), befriending the scandalous Lord Byron, and traveling Europe with her lover and eventual husband. She would write "Frankenstein" as part of a contest with Shelley, Byron, and their friends, and see unexpected success... but also scandal, family struggles, the deaths of several of her children, and near-financial ruin over the course of her life. Yet she faced her struggles with dignity, and stuck close to her values and those she held dear throughout her life. This book can be a little slow at times, focusing almost entirely on Mary's young adulthood, only to rush through her later and final years in the last chapter or two. I can understand this to a degree, as this IS the most pivotal and influential period of her life, but it does make the book drag a little in the middle, especially as it becomes obsessed with describing Mary and Shelley's daily routines. Though said daily routines do help paint a picture of life at the time, which is helpful for a modern reader. This book also mentions other writing by Mary, and makes me curious to explore her other novels and her poetry. Some of her writing, as pointed out by this book, has been lost to time, but it does provide a nice introduction to other works of hers besides "Frankenstein." A fascinating account of one of the most famous female writers of the 19th century, "Daughter of Earth and Water" is a must-read for anyone wanting to know more about Mary Shelley and her work, family, and life.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rodney Welch

    I’ve always been fascinated by the Romantic Poets — their lives, their wives, and their culture, and it doesn’t take much for me to slip down s rabbit hole. I read Frankenstein again last week and moved on to this one mainly because it was handy, a cheap Kindle purchase from some time ago. Certainly it’s a readable, enjoyable, and somewhat functional product of (presumably) the Do No Harm School of Biography, although it doesn’t really delve much into the writing process of the teenager who wrot I’ve always been fascinated by the Romantic Poets — their lives, their wives, and their culture, and it doesn’t take much for me to slip down s rabbit hole. I read Frankenstein again last week and moved on to this one mainly because it was handy, a cheap Kindle purchase from some time ago. Certainly it’s a readable, enjoyable, and somewhat functional product of (presumably) the Do No Harm School of Biography, although it doesn’t really delve much into the writing process of the teenager who wrote a horror classic. Outside of that, I can only trust that the facts are right and that it did a commendable job of laying out the geographical and domestic framework of a highly singular life and marriage. The book, however, was written in 1972, and I did find myself wondering what a near half-century’s scholarship on the Shelleys has turned up. The author frequently says this or that event or relationship or allegation or accusation “remains a mystery,” and I wonder if it still remains so. I hope to move on to books by Richard Holmes and Miranda Seymour to discover more.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ed Mestre

    Mixed feelings about this biography. It’s more my own predisposition than the well researched book itself. My main source of info on Mary Shelley was Ken Russell’s ’70s film “Gothic”, where he gives the night Percy Shelley, Mary, Lord Byron, & Mary’s stepsister gathered & Mary came up with the seed of her first novel, “Frankenstein”. The film presented a decadent proto-hippie, free love & drugs point of view. Well, the book presents a much more staid view of that night & the famous Shelley coupl Mixed feelings about this biography. It’s more my own predisposition than the well researched book itself. My main source of info on Mary Shelley was Ken Russell’s ’70s film “Gothic”, where he gives the night Percy Shelley, Mary, Lord Byron, & Mary’s stepsister gathered & Mary came up with the seed of her first novel, “Frankenstein”. The film presented a decadent proto-hippie, free love & drugs point of view. Well, the book presents a much more staid view of that night & the famous Shelley couple, who, even though they were the scandal of Europe after Percy left his wife to run away with 17 year old Mary, were aghast at Lord Byron’s licentiousness & dealt with, often, mundane domestic & financial matters. Oh, there was still plenty of drama & tragedies, which kept me reading. It did give me a new view & respect for her, more as a proto-feminist than proto-hippie, who dealt with that drama & tragedy admirably.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vikki Ascuena

    Adequate Overview Considering all the impact of Mary Wollstone Shelley, this treatment lacks depth. The author largely fails to assess the critical importance of "Frankenstein." Since this is primarily the work for which she is remembered in her own right, readers might expect some discussion of the theme of parent/child relationships portrayed in the novel and pertinent to Shelley's life experiences. Similarly, the relationship of nature and the sublime would provide insight into Shelley's trave Adequate Overview Considering all the impact of Mary Wollstone Shelley, this treatment lacks depth. The author largely fails to assess the critical importance of "Frankenstein." Since this is primarily the work for which she is remembered in her own right, readers might expect some discussion of the theme of parent/child relationships portrayed in the novel and pertinent to Shelley's life experiences. Similarly, the relationship of nature and the sublime would provide insight into Shelley's travels in Italy and Switzerland. Rather the author catalogs the houses, the friends, and the finances of her life. Perhaps because of the fact that so many other biographies of the Romantics portray their subjects more fully, I found this work lacking although easy to read

  18. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Ibarra

    Percy Bysshe Syelley was a famous poet in the early 19th century, but this book focuses mainly on Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, who went against all the conventions of the British society and decided to live with the poet, still married at that time. This is the story of profound love and trust they felt for each other, but life not devoid of tragedy and hardship. Mary was a remarkable and strong woman, cultured and independent, something almost never seen in those times. She is the author of Fra Percy Bysshe Syelley was a famous poet in the early 19th century, but this book focuses mainly on Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, who went against all the conventions of the British society and decided to live with the poet, still married at that time. This is the story of profound love and trust they felt for each other, but life not devoid of tragedy and hardship. Mary was a remarkable and strong woman, cultured and independent, something almost never seen in those times. She is the author of Frankenstein, which brought her a lot of fame.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Necessary

    I love biographys and this was a great one. The eduring love of Percy and Mary Shelley touched me. Mary Shelley is best remember for being the author of Frankenstein and Percy was a famous poet dying tragically at the age of 29. Besides writing several more books of her own she made sure her husband was not forgotten.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    Throughly enjoyed it I learned a lot about Mary Shelly and her poet husband. It piqued my interest to read some of her writing. Especially now that I understand the background of the person who wrote it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This is an interesting read, and, as it turns out, well-researched. My quibble is that there were no footnotes and on kindle I had no idea that the bibliography is as extensive as it is. The lack of footnotes could just be a function of the kindle version, but I doubt it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Bramlett

    This was a remarkable woman. Although I hated my graduate course in Romantic Poetry, I am thinking I may need to reread the poems of Shelley with a more mature viewpoint. I think I may need to read Frankenstein. A very enjoyable read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Judy Caldwell

    Thoroughly enjoyed reading this book Not only did I enjoy reading the book, but I learned a great deal. Mary and Percy Shelley are inspiring by what they have written and the way they lived their lives.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

    I had no idea. What an amazing, prolific, talented, mature, intelligent, daring, forethinking, feminist.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    She was so much more than her Frankenstein. Her relationship with so many literary characters of her day made her one of them.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    I love Mary Shelley, and was glad to learn more about her. The writing here seems a little dated , and the last decades of her life seem rushed through.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dan A. Foster

    Informative. This is not my typical read, but I found this book to be enlightening as to the times, lifestyles, and personal experiences of the Shelley’s.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary L.

    Very interesting and well written biography. It certainly shows the love one woman could have for one man and how she manifested it to him and to the world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    L Smith

    Excellent Bio The book conveyed the greatness of Mary's and Percy's intellect. But also made them real people, with experiences not to different from our own.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Interesting biography of Mary Shelley.

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