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The Timeless Writings of C.S. Lewis: The Pilgrim's Regress, Christian Reflections, & God in the Dock

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C.S. Lewis's writings are prized for their genius at communicating the philosophical and theological rationale of Christianity in simple, everyday language. Now this inspired collection of three Lewis bestsellers--complete in one volume--allows you to sample some of the best ideas and arguments of this engaging Christian writer. The first book Lewis wrote after his conversi C.S. Lewis's writings are prized for their genius at communicating the philosophical and theological rationale of Christianity in simple, everyday language. Now this inspired collection of three Lewis bestsellers--complete in one volume--allows you to sample some of the best ideas and arguments of this engaging Christian writer. The first book Lewis wrote after his conversion, The Pilgrim's Regress is the Bunyanesque allegory of John and his pursuit of a mysterious, sweet desire that leads him through adventures with Mr. Enlightenment, Mr. Mammon, Mother Kirk, and others. You'll trace Lewis's own journey to faith in this semi-autobiographical account of a modern man's consuming search for spiritual fulfillment. In two collections of shorter essays and letters, Christian Reflections and God in the Dock, you'll discover the wide scope of Lewis's interests--literature, science, theology, war, prayer, capital punishment, culture, and much, much more. Some of these pieces were written specifically for periodicals, others were read to societies in Oxford and Cambridge, still others were originally prepared as talks to diverse audiences. All, however, share Lewis's uniquely effective style and his tireless concern to relate basic--or "mere"--Christianity to every area of life.


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C.S. Lewis's writings are prized for their genius at communicating the philosophical and theological rationale of Christianity in simple, everyday language. Now this inspired collection of three Lewis bestsellers--complete in one volume--allows you to sample some of the best ideas and arguments of this engaging Christian writer. The first book Lewis wrote after his conversi C.S. Lewis's writings are prized for their genius at communicating the philosophical and theological rationale of Christianity in simple, everyday language. Now this inspired collection of three Lewis bestsellers--complete in one volume--allows you to sample some of the best ideas and arguments of this engaging Christian writer. The first book Lewis wrote after his conversion, The Pilgrim's Regress is the Bunyanesque allegory of John and his pursuit of a mysterious, sweet desire that leads him through adventures with Mr. Enlightenment, Mr. Mammon, Mother Kirk, and others. You'll trace Lewis's own journey to faith in this semi-autobiographical account of a modern man's consuming search for spiritual fulfillment. In two collections of shorter essays and letters, Christian Reflections and God in the Dock, you'll discover the wide scope of Lewis's interests--literature, science, theology, war, prayer, capital punishment, culture, and much, much more. Some of these pieces were written specifically for periodicals, others were read to societies in Oxford and Cambridge, still others were originally prepared as talks to diverse audiences. All, however, share Lewis's uniquely effective style and his tireless concern to relate basic--or "mere"--Christianity to every area of life.

54 review for The Timeless Writings of C.S. Lewis: The Pilgrim's Regress, Christian Reflections, & God in the Dock

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    This book is a three-in-one volume of Lewis writings. The first, Pilgrim's Regress was written in the early 1930s, the second two are collections of his shorter works published after his death in 1963. How to review them? Separately, of course. Pilgrim's Regress is an allegory, which I generally avoid. It was also Lewis' first fiction work, so I expected it to be poor. In fact, in an afterword written ten years later, Lewis accuses himself of being obtuse and bitter. He was certainly obtuse. If t This book is a three-in-one volume of Lewis writings. The first, Pilgrim's Regress was written in the early 1930s, the second two are collections of his shorter works published after his death in 1963. How to review them? Separately, of course. Pilgrim's Regress is an allegory, which I generally avoid. It was also Lewis' first fiction work, so I expected it to be poor. In fact, in an afterword written ten years later, Lewis accuses himself of being obtuse and bitter. He was certainly obtuse. If the reader is not conversant in Latin, Greek and French, many of the tossed in phrases will be--well--Greek. That notwithstanding, the book had surprising depth and relevance--much more than Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress written several hundred years before. Worth reading, but not easy going. (January 5, 2012) Christian Reflections are a series of Lewis addresses and essays published posthumously. They are not his best writings, though some include insights to his character and wit not found elsewhere. Unfortunately, Lewis' prose is much as you'd expect of one who spent his whole life in academia and was a the peak of "his game." His faults include long, complex sentences, liberal quotes from Latin and Greek, and literary allusions which are opaque to twenty-first century readers. Some articles made my head hurt. I feel bad to suggest that all but the much serious Lewis reader skip these. There's gold in this ore, but it's hard rock mining. (January 9, 2012) God in the Dock is another compendium of speeches, essays and letters. While better footnoted, they suffer from appearing to be the sweepings of all the remaining works which his literary executors could find. A lot of duplication. In some cases a single work would have served better than several variations of a theme. (January 26, 2012)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Easton Livingston

    This review is for the fiction section only as I have reserved my Goodreads account for that purpose since I am a fiction writer. The first book of the three is The Pilgrim's Regress, a play on words of The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan. Like The Pilgrim's Progress, it is an allegory that endeavors to present a defense for Christianity, reason, and romanticism. The main character in the book is John who early in his life is presented with a basic understanding of the Rules and the Landlord. This review is for the fiction section only as I have reserved my Goodreads account for that purpose since I am a fiction writer. The first book of the three is The Pilgrim's Regress, a play on words of The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan. Like The Pilgrim's Progress, it is an allegory that endeavors to present a defense for Christianity, reason, and romanticism. The main character in the book is John who early in his life is presented with a basic understanding of the Rules and the Landlord. It is also at this time that he has a vision of the Island which drives him for the rest of the book to leave home and find it. On his journey, he encounters a cast of characters, Mr. Enlightenment, Mr. Halfway, Mr. Sensible, and a major supporting character named Vertue. The land is filled with cities of people that are quirky and downright weird like Claptrap and Eschropolis. The book starts off well but then slowly mires itself in recondite prose that seems to end up no where many times. One of the main problems in this book is the obscurity of the symbols. They are buried in their symbolism so deep that they tend to blur the story. The overall presentation is so abstract that you have to re-read sections in order to see where he's going and if there's an actual destination. In addition, he should have tackled just one subject as did Bunyan. Two at the most. By trying to do all three, the content ends up fading into one another and you're not quite sure which of the three He's addressing. This problem is further compounded by the fact he peppers it in far to many places with Latin and Greek, which just bogs down the reading because you have to stop to go see what the phrase means, or you don't but the flow of the prose is jarred as your mind tries to wrap itself around the meaning, even if it is brief. I agree with Lewis' own assessment of the book which he wrote in an afterward of it: On re-reading this book ten years after I wrote it, I find its chief faults to be those two which I myself least easily forgive in the books of other men: needless obscurity and an uncharitable temper. I like Lewis. A lot. I've read his Narnia Chronicles and they were good overall, some better than others. The Pilgrim's Regress seems that it's trying too hard to be deep and by doing so ends up being shallow and confusing. Mr. Lewis has done better.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim Hutson

    Another classic from one of the foundational Christian apologetics of our time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mike E.

    It appeared to me ... that if a man diligently followed the desire, pursuing the false objects until their falsity appeared and then resolutely abandoning them, he must come out at last into the clear knowledge that the human soul was made to enjoy some object that is never fully given ... in our present mode ... I knew only too well how easily the longing accepts false objects and through what dark ways the pursuit of them leads us: but I also saw that the Desire itself contains the corrective It appeared to me ... that if a man diligently followed the desire, pursuing the false objects until their falsity appeared and then resolutely abandoning them, he must come out at last into the clear knowledge that the human soul was made to enjoy some object that is never fully given ... in our present mode ... I knew only too well how easily the longing accepts false objects and through what dark ways the pursuit of them leads us: but I also saw that the Desire itself contains the corrective of all these errors. The only fatal error was to pretend that you had passed from desire to fruition, when, in reality, you had found either nothing, or desire itself, or the satisfaction of some different desire. The dialectic of Desire, faithfully followed, would retrieve all mistakes, head you off from all false paths, and force you not to propound, but to live through, a sort of ontological proof (Lewis, The Pilgrim’s Regress, 10).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bastiaan Bijl

    If man was really supposed to find a rational truth, Lewis seems to have come pretty far. He found something after thinking it all out. This book is a collection of an allegory and two sets of essays. The essays are short and sharp and the Pelgrims Regress story is both bizar and eloquent. The biggest shock comes right in the first part: When he [as a young boy] looked round he saw what he had never expected, yet he was not surprised. There in the grass beside him sat a laughing brown girl of abo If man was really supposed to find a rational truth, Lewis seems to have come pretty far. He found something after thinking it all out. This book is a collection of an allegory and two sets of essays. The essays are short and sharp and the Pelgrims Regress story is both bizar and eloquent. The biggest shock comes right in the first part: When he [as a young boy] looked round he saw what he had never expected, yet he was not surprised. There in the grass beside him sat a laughing brown girl of about his own age, and she had no clothes on. 'It was me you wanted,' said the brown girl. 'I am better than your silly Islands.' And John rose and caught her, all in haste, and committed fornification with her in the wood. It might be one of those elements of the story about Lewis states this in the Afterword to Third Edition: On re-reading this book ten years after I wrote it, I find its chief faults to be those two which I myself least easily forgive in the books of other men: needless obscurity, and an uncharitable temper. One final citation, which is one of the highlighes I remember from the first read, from the ninth part deals with storytelling itself: And what the others saw I do not know: but John saw the Island. [...] But for John, because so many thousands looked at it with him, the pain and the longing were changed and all unlike what they had been of old: for humility was mixed with their wildness, and the sweetness came not with pride and with the lonely dreams of poets nor with the glamour of a secret, but with the homespun truth of folk-tales, and with the sadness of graves and freshness of earth in the morning. There was fear in it also, and hope: and it began to seem well to him that the Island should be different from his desires, and so different that, if he had known it, he would not have sought it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    I tried to finish this book. CSLewis became profoundly deep in his writing that I felt I needed a scholars degree to comprehend it. I did not finish but half and decided to give my brain freedom from such back and forth mind boggling debates. I would never have wanted to be in the brain thoughts of CSLewis. 3 stars

  7. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    I love C.S. Lewis but the allegory Pilgrim's Regress was a bit heavy. I love C.S. Lewis but the allegory Pilgrim's Regress was a bit heavy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  9. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  10. 4 out of 5

    S Ulrich

  11. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

  12. 5 out of 5

    Wayne Carlson

  13. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jared Crabtree

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sage

  16. 5 out of 5

    Blue

  17. 5 out of 5

    +Chaz

  18. 4 out of 5

    Justin Fuller

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  20. 5 out of 5

    James Bojaciuk

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Robert Ott

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lee Leach divergigelis

  26. 5 out of 5

    David Napier

  27. 5 out of 5

    Theodore Zachariades

  28. 4 out of 5

    Wes

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandi Claussen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zach

  31. 4 out of 5

    James Bojaciuk

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina Robinson

  33. 5 out of 5

    Mike Rodgers

  34. 5 out of 5

    peter

  35. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

  36. 4 out of 5

    Terry

  37. 4 out of 5

    Ritchie

  38. 5 out of 5

    Jon Bergdoll

  39. 4 out of 5

    Pete Cantelon

  40. 5 out of 5

    Erfan

  41. 5 out of 5

    Obadiah

  42. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

  43. 5 out of 5

    Charles

  44. 5 out of 5

    Rob

  45. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  46. 4 out of 5

    Art

  47. 5 out of 5

    Damarys Hernandez

  48. 5 out of 5

    Diane Lynn

  49. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  50. 4 out of 5

    Lee Morrison

  51. 5 out of 5

    Amos

  52. 4 out of 5

    Selena

  53. 4 out of 5

    Justin Wiggins

  54. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

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