counter create hit The Betrayal: The Lost Life of Jesus - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Betrayal: The Lost Life of Jesus

Availability: Ready to download

There is an alternate story of the life of Jesus.  One the early Church fathers found so menacing they outlawed the books that documented it, ordered them burned, and threatened anyone found copying them with death.  International bestselling authors and award-winning archaeologists Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear put more than thirty years of exhaustive research There is an alternate story of the life of Jesus.  One the early Church fathers found so menacing they outlawed the books that documented it, ordered them burned, and threatened anyone found copying them with death.  International bestselling authors and award-winning archaeologists Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear put more than thirty years of exhaustive research into this fascinating novel. In A.D. 325, Brother Barnabas is a student of the ancient holy texts.  These books paint a portrait of Jesus that is radical, heretical, and irresistible.  In the writings of Mary Magdalene, Phillip, and James, Barnabas finds clues to a secret he must protect at all costs.  But the Ecumenical Council of Bishops has just declared his cherished books "a hotbed of manifold perversity."  Emperor Constantine has decreed that the documents must be burned and that anyone found copying them will be executed as a heretic. Barnabas's monastery is attacked.  Brother Barnabas flees with his trusted companions, but they are being followed, for the True Church cannot allow them to find the most sacred place on Earth.  In fact, it will do anything to stop them...


Compare

There is an alternate story of the life of Jesus.  One the early Church fathers found so menacing they outlawed the books that documented it, ordered them burned, and threatened anyone found copying them with death.  International bestselling authors and award-winning archaeologists Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear put more than thirty years of exhaustive research There is an alternate story of the life of Jesus.  One the early Church fathers found so menacing they outlawed the books that documented it, ordered them burned, and threatened anyone found copying them with death.  International bestselling authors and award-winning archaeologists Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear put more than thirty years of exhaustive research into this fascinating novel. In A.D. 325, Brother Barnabas is a student of the ancient holy texts.  These books paint a portrait of Jesus that is radical, heretical, and irresistible.  In the writings of Mary Magdalene, Phillip, and James, Barnabas finds clues to a secret he must protect at all costs.  But the Ecumenical Council of Bishops has just declared his cherished books "a hotbed of manifold perversity."  Emperor Constantine has decreed that the documents must be burned and that anyone found copying them will be executed as a heretic. Barnabas's monastery is attacked.  Brother Barnabas flees with his trusted companions, but they are being followed, for the True Church cannot allow them to find the most sacred place on Earth.  In fact, it will do anything to stop them...

30 review for The Betrayal: The Lost Life of Jesus

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    The Gears warn that this book could be considered controversial because it brings into question certain passages of the bible. For me, it was not controversial at all. I have grown up listening to a more historical view of Christianity and see the bible as a historical document more than anything else. The Gears are well respected archaeologists and writers and they did not disappoint me with this book. This book takes place in the days leading up to the crucifiction and then in alternate chapte The Gears warn that this book could be considered controversial because it brings into question certain passages of the bible. For me, it was not controversial at all. I have grown up listening to a more historical view of Christianity and see the bible as a historical document more than anything else. The Gears are well respected archaeologists and writers and they did not disappoint me with this book. This book takes place in the days leading up to the crucifiction and then in alternate chapters, during the time just after the council at Nicea. It is an interesting (and very readable) look at how many gospels were destroyed and how the Jews and then the Christians manipulated the written word to coincide with their beliefs. If you have a literal belief in the bible, than this is not the book for you. If you want to learn more about how our bible has come to be, and want a good mystery to read at the same time, then dig in!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vic

    The Betrayal: The Lost Life of Jesus: A Novel by Kathleen O'Neal Gear is an infinitely more interesting and provocative commentary on religion than the gimmicky book by A. J. Jacobs about his year of living biblically. I have never particularly liked nor believed in organized religion nor found any comfort in religious doctrine. Nor do I respect an industry that consists of each group lobbying vociferously for their own particular brand of truth. Not to mention the outright lying, acts of genoci The Betrayal: The Lost Life of Jesus: A Novel by Kathleen O'Neal Gear is an infinitely more interesting and provocative commentary on religion than the gimmicky book by A. J. Jacobs about his year of living biblically. I have never particularly liked nor believed in organized religion nor found any comfort in religious doctrine. Nor do I respect an industry that consists of each group lobbying vociferously for their own particular brand of truth. Not to mention the outright lying, acts of genocide, horrendous judgment, exclusion and persecution of those individuals who dare to question or resist indoctrination into ____ name the religion. Be that as it may, I am in no way a non-believer, infidel maybe, but non-believer, no. I believe with all my heart that God exists and that a divine spark lives in each and every one of us. I also believe beyond a doubt there are a great many people who gain comfort from their faith and their religious beliefs. In my mind, this begs the question: does it really matter what we have faith in, or is there a mechanism that produces a feeling or a change simply by the fervent belief or repetitive belief of something until it is created externally or physically as our own personal reality? There is a mystery to life, a spiritual dimension that is neither easily understood nor explained. I think that part of that mystery is our limited understanding or self-awareness of the mysterious and magical creation we physically inhabit. We are basically elegant creatures with most of our computing capacity turned off. I suppose that one of the great purposes of life is to turn on the internal computer. But I digress. Kathleen Gear has written a provocative, highly controversial fictional narrative about the life of Jesus Christ. The essential premise of the story is simple: the resurrection is most likely fictitious and the immaculate conception, the bedrock of Christian faith, makes for a better religious story than the holy mother getting knocked up by a roman centurion, which apparently is fairly well documented. I can’t imagine mainstream America, or mainstream anywhere for that matter, not wanting to blow this book off as either heresy or simply the evil rantings an overactive imagination. What most of the naysayers probably don't realize about Kathleen and her husband, Michael Gear, is that they are trained academicians, archaeologists and historians. When they do historical fiction they write only what they have studied and worked out scholarly and empirically. Never mind that the Church decided to ban the inclusion of the most interesting and vexing of the gospels in the Bible. Never mind that the Church has assumed and maintained control over what the average person is to know, and hence believe, happened some two thousand years ago. The Gears are scientists who love the mystery, touch the mystery and believe in the mystery; they simply do not accept the pretense and blatant disregard for accuracy or detail that lurk in the shadows of the church. The work is classic Gear all the way. As writers they entertain, but more than that, they are teachers. Everything is well documented. Nothing is presented as absolute, only a legitimate possibility, maybe even likelihood. Still, like all good teachers, their intention is to provoke the reader into thinking and feeling in a new way based on new information. All of their historical fiction is intended to teach while entertaining. They excel at placing the reader squarely into the time period they are writing about and this story is certainly no exception. They love to challenge convention and unabashedly include sexuality in all of their explorations of spirituality and divine mystery. I must admit, I love these guys and what they bring to my world.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Doug

    I am a student of archaeology, anthropology and American history (not just the colonists), so I have read and enjoyed many books based on American Indian life by the Gears. I did not even know this one existed until I ran across it in the library. I'm glad I did. I just so happened to be investigating early Christianity, before the Church and scribes started mucking with it, in my own spiritual studies at the time, so it was very fortuitous. I don't take this as a new gospel or anything, but it I am a student of archaeology, anthropology and American history (not just the colonists), so I have read and enjoyed many books based on American Indian life by the Gears. I did not even know this one existed until I ran across it in the library. I'm glad I did. I just so happened to be investigating early Christianity, before the Church and scribes started mucking with it, in my own spiritual studies at the time, so it was very fortuitous. I don't take this as a new gospel or anything, but it did lead me to start reading the gnostic books to judge them for myself. Some I can definitely see why they were left out, others seem more fitting than some of those that made the Bible. It hasn't harmed my faith, if anything it helped bring me back some towards the center. I have been able to separate Christ from the Church better in my mind. The Church has some positives mixed in with a heap of negatives throughout history and I was beginning to associate those with Christ. For the authors research and making me think, I give it 5 stars. The story is interesting, but sometimes the prose is a little dry -- that's the only reason it gets 4 stars. But you don't read the Gears only for the prose, you read it for their well-researched worlds they bring to life, and they don't disappoint on that here. If you could give half-stars, I'd bump it up to 4 1/2 because annotated historical fiction is brilliant. Side note: Kathleen O'Neal Gear is the lead author on this one. They switch-up the name order on their books to show who was lead. And to the person saying that this was just written to cash-in on the Dan Brown success: the dedication to Kathleen's mother, for her life-long spiritual quest to uncover the truth, and instilling that same passion in her daughter, in a book published the year following the mother's death, seems to say it was a very personal reason. Brown is so loose with archaeology they shouldn't be considered in the same genre.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    A very good look at what the monks of 325 CE might have gone through after the Nicean Council voted on the beliefs of Christianity and which Gospels counted. While the main story was fictional, it was backed up with research and footnotes from the ancient texts (Dead Sea Scrolls, Nag Hammadi library, etc). I personally enjoyed reading the footnotes more than the story; not because the story was that bad, but because I am very interested in early Christianity and how it drastically differed from A very good look at what the monks of 325 CE might have gone through after the Nicean Council voted on the beliefs of Christianity and which Gospels counted. While the main story was fictional, it was backed up with research and footnotes from the ancient texts (Dead Sea Scrolls, Nag Hammadi library, etc). I personally enjoyed reading the footnotes more than the story; not because the story was that bad, but because I am very interested in early Christianity and how it drastically differed from our modern "Christianity". While I think this book should be required reading for anybody who calls themself a Christian, it is not for those who are closed-minded (e.g. people who won't read "The Golden Compass" because an atheist wrote it, or who won't read Harry Potter because it's "evil"...even though they have no first-hand knowledge of the stories) or are incapable of thinking outside the tight little box of what they've been told to believe. In other words, if you don't want to consider the possibility that Jesus was simply an ordinary person who had an extraordinary effect on the world....don't read this book. If, like me, you want more of an insight into early Christianity....give it a shot. If nothing else, the footnotes will give you some good, nonfictional references to read. (Primarily the other gospels, like Nicodemus, Thomas, Philip, and Mary, but other reference books are listed, too.)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    The Betrayal is a blasphemous book. Part of it is the alternative story of Jesus, based on the gospels that were excluded from the Bible at the Council of Nicea in 325 A.D. In this historical version, Jesus was the illegitimate son of a Roman solder named Pantera. And his body was stolen from the original tomb and entombed elsewhere to keep it from being desecrated by the Romans. After the Council of Nicea the alternative gospels, such as Thomas and Philip, were ordered to be destroyed, and to p The Betrayal is a blasphemous book. Part of it is the alternative story of Jesus, based on the gospels that were excluded from the Bible at the Council of Nicea in 325 A.D. In this historical version, Jesus was the illegitimate son of a Roman solder named Pantera. And his body was stolen from the original tomb and entombed elsewhere to keep it from being desecrated by the Romans. After the Council of Nicea the alternative gospels, such as Thomas and Philip, were ordered to be destroyed, and to possess or copy them was punishable by death. The greater part of this novel is the story of some renegade priests who tried to preserve the illegal gospels, and while being pursued by Constantine's soldiers tried to follow an ancient map that might lead them to the Pearl, the body of Jesus in its secret tomb. This is a thought-provoking book, recommended for those who have curiosity about Christianity instead of unquestioning belief.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne Arp

    I have always been interested in the history of religions, in particular the Judeo-Christian history. This book presented a fresh look at this old and oft abused story with the kind of detail that, in true Gear fashion, brought the times, places, and people alive. Better than that, I loved the research they did and that they added extensive notes and research references to the book as well. If religious history is one of your interests, or if you just like a good story, you will like that book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kara Babcock

    The historicity of Jesus Christ is one of the most controversial and interesting subjects of Christian scholarship. I am also particularly interested in the Council of Nicea in 325 C.E. and its curation of what would eventually become the New Testament. The Betrayal offers a fictional perspective on both, drawing on accumulated evidence to present an historical interpretation of the life and death of Jesus and the shaping of Christianity three centuries later. While its presentation of Jesus and The historicity of Jesus Christ is one of the most controversial and interesting subjects of Christian scholarship. I am also particularly interested in the Council of Nicea in 325 C.E. and its curation of what would eventually become the New Testament. The Betrayal offers a fictional perspective on both, drawing on accumulated evidence to present an historical interpretation of the life and death of Jesus and the shaping of Christianity three centuries later. While its presentation of Jesus and the Church in such a stark, scholarly light is thought-provoking, it's to the detriment of the story, a fatal flaw in any work of fiction. When it comes to historical fiction, it's easy for the author to claim that his or her research makes the book historically accurate. Bolstering those claims with notes, endnotes, and a bibliography exponentially increases the credibility of one's book--and I don't know about other readers, but I don't care enough to look into the research behind my fiction. Still, I do prefer accuracy, and it certainly helps in this case that the authors are archaeologists. Ultimately, it does not matter whether or not the Gears' depiction of the historical Jesus is accurate (after all, we'll never know). Instead, what matters is that their scenario presents a realistic alternative to the contradictory Biblical testimony. At this, I believe they succeed. Of the two time periods in which The Betrayal takes place, I far prefer the later one. It concerns three monks--Barnabas, Zarathan, and Cyrus--and a washerwoman from their monastery--Kalay--who flee the monastery after the other monks are murdered. They're protecting books that the Council of Nicea has declared heretical, and Barnabas has an ulterior desire to locate a treasure known only as "the Pearl." We get a standard evasion/treasure quest plot with a wise old man (Barnabas), a soldier with a dark past (Cyrus), a whiny youngster (Zarathan), and a hauntingly beautiful yet capable woman (Kalay). I enjoyed these characters immensely, particularly Zarathan and Kalay. I wanted to kill Zarathan, and Kalay was just deliciously capable. Unfortunately, Barnabas and Cyrus were more two-dimensional, as were the villains. The earlier time period, set around the time of Jesus' crucifixion, interested me less. Maybe it was the way it was narrated, but the events seemed dry, and I never really empathized with any of the characters or their dilemmas. Still, the Gears debunk a lot of the common stories associated with the crucifixion--Judas, Barrabas, etc.--and the resurrection. In one respect, Dan Brown trumps the Gears: he can write. The Da Vinci Code may have been of questionable historical accuracy, but at least it had a compelling story. While I liked The Betrayal's characterization, its plot left much to be desired, particularly the resolution. There's very little drama, most of it suspense created as we watch the pursuers close on our protagonists. Toward the end, as our protagonists try to locate the ambigiously-identified Pearl, we get treated to an increasingly esoteric conversation as to the meaning of various Hebrew words translated into Latin--oh joy. The Name of the Rose this is not. I praise The Betrayal for portraying a historical, human Jesus while simultaneously preserving his faith. This is not an anti-Christian or anti-Christianity novel. Rather, it expresses a possibility--the aim of any good work of fiction. I'd recommend this to anyone interested in Biblical scholarship, with the caveat that it's a little dry and slightly crispy. A little steak sauce will go nicely.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    My classification for this book is probably a little weird. Books aren't normally Historical-Fiction and Non-Fiction at the same time. This book is really a historical fiction book but so much of it (I would say more than your average historical fiction) is based on facts. They even footnoted the book and had a bibliography. They warn in the introduction to this book that some may find this book controversial and upsetting. The story is told in two main different time periods, the main story bei My classification for this book is probably a little weird. Books aren't normally Historical-Fiction and Non-Fiction at the same time. This book is really a historical fiction book but so much of it (I would say more than your average historical fiction) is based on facts. They even footnoted the book and had a bibliography. They warn in the introduction to this book that some may find this book controversial and upsetting. The story is told in two main different time periods, the main story being after the Council of Nicea in 325 and the decisions the Church made at that time ie banning some of the Gospels. The secondary storyline is told from Joseph of Arimathea at the time of Jesus’ crucifixion. Without going into too many personal details, I didn’t find the story particularly controversial. Many of the facts in the book are things that I have heard before and that frankly I have accepted long ago. The authors say in the introduction, “Knowledge does not destroy faith. It does not take Jesus away. In fact, we believe it can give back the profound meaning to his life that has been lost over centuries of revisionism.” I agree with the authors here. The one thing that I did find difficult about the story was the names. They authors mentioned that they decided to use the historical names. Depending upon the time period and the formality of the situation the names could vary more. I found this really confusing. I couldn’t remember who was who and I didn’t know who to pronounce these words in my head so it made me stumble a lot while reading. Still, I liked this book a lot. It was slow reading for me but a powerful story. If you think you might be interested in the book you should maybe check out the author’s website. http://www.gear-gear.com/

  9. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I love historical fiction and I also love anything that has to do with bringing a touch of reality to the Bible and the life of Jesus. So when I saw this book at my local library, I snatched it up. The premise: Rome has decided that Jesus' birth was indeed virgin and his resurrection was fleshly. That means that any book stating otherwise must be destroyed. Enter Barnabas. He's a monk in charge of the books at his monastery and who has knowledge of the content and whereabouts of certain now-hereti I love historical fiction and I also love anything that has to do with bringing a touch of reality to the Bible and the life of Jesus. So when I saw this book at my local library, I snatched it up. The premise: Rome has decided that Jesus' birth was indeed virgin and his resurrection was fleshly. That means that any book stating otherwise must be destroyed. Enter Barnabas. He's a monk in charge of the books at his monastery and who has knowledge of the content and whereabouts of certain now-heretical texts which he vows to protect. He and his monastic brothers, Cyrus (a former Roman soldier who has given his life over to God) and Zarathan (a young monk who is as annoying as he is useless, at least in the beginning), by chance end up being the only three survivors when Emperor Constantine's henchman come to enforce the new rules regarding heretical texts. Oh, and there's a feisty redhead named Kalay thrown in for good measure. She was the washerwoman for the monastery and ends up tagging along with the group as a foil to their faith (she's a pagan goddess worshipper and a temptation to both Cyrus and Zarathan). I had high hopes for this book, but overall, I was disappointed with it. There were some stellar parts: the backstory regarding the trial, crucifixion, burial, and 'resurrection' of Jesus was riveting. It was the rest that was a little too convoluted for my taste. Bad guys, torture, rape, a desperate chase, and a love story to boot, which made my eyes roll back so far in my head, I think I saw my brain. There's also a bit of the supernatural (or the divine, if you're so inclined) thrown in as well. And it's not as if I am opposed to any of these things, but when the footnotes are more interesting than the story, you know there's something wrong. I expected more. Perhaps I expected too much.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    Although this book is not as well written or captivating as most of the others I have read by the Gears it is certainly thought provoking. As most of their other books, the chapters alternate time periods, in this one between the days immediately following the cruxifiction of Christ, and the days just afer the meeting at Nicocea that established what books would be chosen to be part of the New Testament. This book, while written as fiction, is foot-noted and well researched. Basic tenents of cur Although this book is not as well written or captivating as most of the others I have read by the Gears it is certainly thought provoking. As most of their other books, the chapters alternate time periods, in this one between the days immediately following the cruxifiction of Christ, and the days just afer the meeting at Nicocea that established what books would be chosen to be part of the New Testament. This book, while written as fiction, is foot-noted and well researched. Basic tenents of current Christian doctrine are challenged by the documents the authors have utilized here--and certain historical reasons, both political and religioius, are fully explored. That is not to say that everything that is presented in this book has the ring of absolute truth, either, but I would recommend this book to any who are searching to know more about the history of the Christian faith.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sharee Johnson

    I couldn't put it down. Lost Life of Jesus authors Kathleen and Michael Gear--both archaologists and Kathleen a bible scholar---have shared a powerful life of Jesus from the gospels and the alternative sources. Using other writings close to the time of Jesus, they have put together a new picture of Jesus--at least it would be new to some. We are studying Bart Ehrman's "The Historical Jesus" from the Teaching Company in Sunday School. This book puts together Ehrman's curriculum in novel form and I couldn't put it down. Lost Life of Jesus authors Kathleen and Michael Gear--both archaologists and Kathleen a bible scholar---have shared a powerful life of Jesus from the gospels and the alternative sources. Using other writings close to the time of Jesus, they have put together a new picture of Jesus--at least it would be new to some. We are studying Bart Ehrman's "The Historical Jesus" from the Teaching Company in Sunday School. This book puts together Ehrman's curriculum in novel form and kept me wanting more. In fact--when it was done I was disappointed---I wanted it to go on. I started it one night and finished it the next---again I couldn't put it down

  12. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    I am a true believer and this book did nothing to change that. I love thinking of Jesus as ever more human than the church would have you believe. This was a great read and I will look into reading more from this author team.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alex Telander

    THE BETRAYAL: THE LOST LIFE OF JESUS BY KATHLEEN O’NEAL GEAR AND W. MICHAEL GEAR: Renowned husband and wife authors W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O’Neal Gear, of the First North Americans and Anasazi Mysteries series, return with their most controversial book to date. Also archaeologists, the Gears apply over thirty years of research with their backgrounds in biblical archaeology, religious studies, Greek, Latin, to reveal a new and relatively unknown and historically unsupported biography of Jes THE BETRAYAL: THE LOST LIFE OF JESUS BY KATHLEEN O’NEAL GEAR AND W. MICHAEL GEAR: Renowned husband and wife authors W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O’Neal Gear, of the First North Americans and Anasazi Mysteries series, return with their most controversial book to date. Also archaeologists, the Gears apply over thirty years of research with their backgrounds in biblical archaeology, religious studies, Greek, Latin, to reveal a new and relatively unknown and historically unsupported biography of Jesus Christ, or Yeshua. The Betrayal is told from two viewpoints; the first is that of Yeshua, as he travels in his time, changing the world in his way, and while one would consider this to be the important character of the book, this plotline serves more as an additional realization to the main viewpoint and character of the book, Brother Barnabas. The monk Barnabas, living in the year 325 after Yeshua, is a student and copier of the ancient holy texts, the texts that tell the true story of Yeshua, some in his very own words. These books portray a Jesus different from the commonly known one: heretical and radical, contrary to the contemporary Church’s teachings. The Ecumenical Council of Bishops has now decided that these holy texts are nothing more than “a hotbed of manifold perversity,” contrary to the Christian faith, and are therefore not to be read or copied by anyone. Emperor Constantine decrees that all copies of the sacred texts are to be destroyed and anyone found with them will be executed as a heretic. But Brother Barnabas knows that the texts tell the true story of Jesus, and he makes it his mission, as ordained by God, to save them for the world and the future, at no matter what cost. While The Betrayal seems well researched and given the Gears’ background, they clearly know what they are talking about, the reader is left wondering how much of this is really true, and could this really be a giant conspiracy hidden by the Church after all this time. The book is classed as fiction and shelved in that section in bookstores, as well as featuring a favorable quote from Lewis Purdue, author of Da Vinci Legacy. In fact, The Betrayal does bear some resemblances to the likes of Da Vinci Code, Rule of Four, and other books published in the last decade which question the religious dogma, much to the outrage of the Church. It begs the question as to whether the Gears are looking more for the true story of Jesus, or perhaps a bestselling novel in this popular genre, or perhaps both? The reader will have to decide for him- or herself. For more book reviews, and author interviews, go to BookBanter.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    I find the Gear's anthropological approach to historical fiction, concerning native American tribal life, not only provocative but captivatingly exciting and I wanted to see how they would apply their research methods to another culture. Because of the enmeshment of Christianity with the western world there are numerous “cautions” to readers that this story might be thought to be a challenge to the faithful but most of the revelations were not as shocking as I thought they might be. While the de I find the Gear's anthropological approach to historical fiction, concerning native American tribal life, not only provocative but captivatingly exciting and I wanted to see how they would apply their research methods to another culture. Because of the enmeshment of Christianity with the western world there are numerous “cautions” to readers that this story might be thought to be a challenge to the faithful but most of the revelations were not as shocking as I thought they might be. While the devout may find the notion that Jesus was possibly an illegitimate child rather rather than a virgin birth or that his body was conceivably stolen from the tomb rather physically ascending to heaven offensive, the numerous notes and bibliography citations give evidence how these conflicting stories may have occurred. The story is divided among two periods. The first is set at the time of Jesus' latter life when he has become a threat to Roman rule as well as to the priests of the Jewish temple. Here, we see the events through the eyes of his followers and contemporaries. The second thread takes place some 325 years later as three monks in an Egyptian monastery find that their exposure to early literature, conflicting with the official church doctrine of Constantine, has made them a target for assassination. It's during their flight that they debate and explain the origins and differences in the story of Jesus. This portion is a little labored as they confront then escape and then confront and escape the assassins again, however, the gimmick works and it does allow the reader to understand what was at stake and what is still at stake after two thousand years. It was an interesting narrative.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Once again Kathleen O'Neal Gear and Michael Gear have produced a provocative book-that is thoughtful- loving- and respectful of cultural norms and antiquities . Historical and political the book challenges the readers senses and understanding of true meaning. I loved the book- found it a very hard read ,not because of content or subject matter- but i found myself glued to the footnotes and my Ipad looking up details and checking historical facts. The story was well developed the characters believa Once again Kathleen O'Neal Gear and Michael Gear have produced a provocative book-that is thoughtful- loving- and respectful of cultural norms and antiquities . Historical and political the book challenges the readers senses and understanding of true meaning. I loved the book- found it a very hard read ,not because of content or subject matter- but i found myself glued to the footnotes and my Ipad looking up details and checking historical facts. The story was well developed the characters believable and the research superb .A better understanding of faith- and a clearer concept of why facts were not "adding up" in the cultural/spiritual understanding I was gaining as an avid reader of the Jewish traditions. Questions the role and human motivation of Constantine with a clean view of how an emperor an warrior would think. Humanity is better understood after reading this novel and my spiritual beliefs more greatly appreciated as I celebrate the rituals and understand the politics behind the words and why they have been so powerfully protected by the church. Felt as though I saw a side of Jesus that my spirit has connected with and my human mind has struggled with for 50+ years. Oh- so now that makes sense... redirect the blame is an old and familiar game- from the beginning of time...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Pbwritr

    Another book that compels me to want to read and learn more about a subject, this time about Jesus and the history of Christianity. Not the Bible, but historical fact. This novel had footnotes to help illuminate the points made. It was a bit confusing to go back and forth between the time of Jesus and the mid-4th century, especially of soldiers following "the good guys" each time. Great reasonings as to how the Bible was put together, along with key tenets of Christianity, and why: i.e., the Vir Another book that compels me to want to read and learn more about a subject, this time about Jesus and the history of Christianity. Not the Bible, but historical fact. This novel had footnotes to help illuminate the points made. It was a bit confusing to go back and forth between the time of Jesus and the mid-4th century, especially of soldiers following "the good guys" each time. Great reasonings as to how the Bible was put together, along with key tenets of Christianity, and why: i.e., the Virgin birth, and the resurrection--supposedly invented by Jesus' followers.

  17. 4 out of 5

    a

    This book wasn't a great novel, but it made me think about a set of historical issues I hadn't thought about in a long time, and about the basis of faith, and for that, I really enjoyed it. It has also prompted a lot of conversation in my house about the Gnostic Gospels and what they may or may not contribute to an understanding of the historical (in my case) and divine (in my partner's case) Jesus. As others have noted, the ending was lousy. This book wasn't a great novel, but it made me think about a set of historical issues I hadn't thought about in a long time, and about the basis of faith, and for that, I really enjoyed it. It has also prompted a lot of conversation in my house about the Gnostic Gospels and what they may or may not contribute to an understanding of the historical (in my case) and divine (in my partner's case) Jesus. As others have noted, the ending was lousy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    The Betrayal: The Lost Life of Jesus by Kathleen O'Neal Gear, W. Michael Gear a great story bringing a question of the writers of history a very strong story about how it is his portrayal that is the betrayal of the story of Jesus as always one of my favorite authors come through, with pages you can not put down or out of your mind.... although its probably controversial in the catholic church it would be hard to say wither it can be disproved... but a good read in any case The Betrayal: The Lost Life of Jesus by Kathleen O'Neal Gear, W. Michael Gear a great story bringing a question of the writers of history a very strong story about how it is his portrayal that is the betrayal of the story of Jesus as always one of my favorite authors come through, with pages you can not put down or out of your mind.... although its probably controversial in the catholic church it would be hard to say wither it can be disproved... but a good read in any case

  19. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    a great story bringing a question of the writers of history a very strong story about how it is his portrayal that is the betrayal of the story of Jesus as always one of my favorite authors come through, with pages you can not put down or out of your mind.... although its probably controversial in the catholic church it would be hard to say wither it can be disproved... but a good read in any case

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    I have not completely finished this volume but have found it fascinating. It is very different from the usual books Mike and Kathleen have written in the past (mostly about the Native Americans), but I have found it to be, of course, controversial but also enticing to read to find out what some of the old papers, research and archeologial digs have brought out in recent years.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell Kaufman

    The Gears take the Apocrypha and blend them in a thrilling tale of adventure, as two monks and the washerwoman from the monastery struggle to avoid capture and certain death from the forces of the Council of Nicaea, all the while trying to interpret ancient texts to find the secret of "the Pearl". Another winner from the Gears. The Gears take the Apocrypha and blend them in a thrilling tale of adventure, as two monks and the washerwoman from the monastery struggle to avoid capture and certain death from the forces of the Council of Nicaea, all the while trying to interpret ancient texts to find the secret of "the Pearl". Another winner from the Gears.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Orth

    Power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely. The institution of the church has done a lot to compromise and abuse the true message of Yeshua of Nazareth. This novel speaks to the reality of the institution and the absolute power and control it has sought to exercise by the suppression of minority groups, women, and other belief systems. Fascinating read!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Checked out of library, didn't get to read. Looks like a well written book by a couple who seem to know their stuff (archaeology/anthropology). From the description here and in the cover of the book, I definitely want to add it to my bookshelves. Checked out of library, didn't get to read. Looks like a well written book by a couple who seem to know their stuff (archaeology/anthropology). From the description here and in the cover of the book, I definitely want to add it to my bookshelves.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This is what The Da Vinci Code wants to be when it grows up. Thoroughly researched, with citations included, THIS book both challenged and affirmed beliefs I have held for many years. So, so wonderful.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mags

    I really enjoy the Gears work with the Native American themes. Wasn't sure what to expect. I believe that this is a fair assessment of what Jesus may have been like. Seems more honest and balanced than the religious zealots would have made him out to be. I really enjoy the Gears work with the Native American themes. Wasn't sure what to expect. I believe that this is a fair assessment of what Jesus may have been like. Seems more honest and balanced than the religious zealots would have made him out to be.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kat Pegfred

    This book is like Mythbusters for Christianity...with a hell of an adventure tale woven in. I'm grateful to the Gears for writing this tome! The amount of research they put into writing this is breathtaking - they even accessed the Vatican library for some of their sources! This book is like Mythbusters for Christianity...with a hell of an adventure tale woven in. I'm grateful to the Gears for writing this tome! The amount of research they put into writing this is breathtaking - they even accessed the Vatican library for some of their sources!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Holloway

    On recommendation from my sister Joy, I picked this book up. It gives you a different perspective on Jesus, and it is a great book...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Curt

    A great read, I really enjoyed this story and the way it was told by the authors. Very entertaining and thought provoking.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Velvetink

    Probably 4 stars for historical info. & accurate biblio. Great references and Hebrew, Greek & Biblical Aramaic translations. Ending was a little abrupt. Tug lib throw out. 60cents

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nora

    Really Really Good.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.