counter create hit Lafcadio Hearn's "The Faceless Ghost" and Other Macabre Tales from Japan: A Graphic Novel - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Lafcadio Hearn's "The Faceless Ghost" and Other Macabre Tales from Japan: A Graphic Novel

Availability: Ready to download

Eerie traditional Japanese ghost stories retold in a graphic novel format. Nominated for the prestigious EISNER AWARD - the top award in the USA for comics/graphic novels. In the category of: '15. Best Adaptation from Another Medium' http://www.comic-con.org/awards/2016-... Over one hundred years ago, the writer Lafcadio Hearn gathered and translated into English a selection Eerie traditional Japanese ghost stories retold in a graphic novel format. Nominated for the prestigious EISNER AWARD - the top award in the USA for comics/graphic novels. In the category of: '15. Best Adaptation from Another Medium' http://www.comic-con.org/awards/2016-... Over one hundred years ago, the writer Lafcadio Hearn gathered and translated into English a selection of traditional Japanese ghost/mystery stories. They were published as Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things. In this new graphic novel, acclaimed manga creator Sean Michael Wilson retells six of these stories. All of them are very well known in Japan, where ghosts and demons are often called yokai, meaning "the mysterious and weird." Today these stories find expression mostly in movies and manga, but they remain rooted in the traditional ghost stories of the Edo era known as kaidan, which means "recited narrative of strange, mysterious, rare, or bewitching apparitions."      The book includes an author's afterword by Sean Michael Wilson, who puts the stories into a personal and historical context.


Compare

Eerie traditional Japanese ghost stories retold in a graphic novel format. Nominated for the prestigious EISNER AWARD - the top award in the USA for comics/graphic novels. In the category of: '15. Best Adaptation from Another Medium' http://www.comic-con.org/awards/2016-... Over one hundred years ago, the writer Lafcadio Hearn gathered and translated into English a selection Eerie traditional Japanese ghost stories retold in a graphic novel format. Nominated for the prestigious EISNER AWARD - the top award in the USA for comics/graphic novels. In the category of: '15. Best Adaptation from Another Medium' http://www.comic-con.org/awards/2016-... Over one hundred years ago, the writer Lafcadio Hearn gathered and translated into English a selection of traditional Japanese ghost/mystery stories. They were published as Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things. In this new graphic novel, acclaimed manga creator Sean Michael Wilson retells six of these stories. All of them are very well known in Japan, where ghosts and demons are often called yokai, meaning "the mysterious and weird." Today these stories find expression mostly in movies and manga, but they remain rooted in the traditional ghost stories of the Edo era known as kaidan, which means "recited narrative of strange, mysterious, rare, or bewitching apparitions."      The book includes an author's afterword by Sean Michael Wilson, who puts the stories into a personal and historical context.

30 review for Lafcadio Hearn's "The Faceless Ghost" and Other Macabre Tales from Japan: A Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    Beautiful art with eerie storytelling. I wish this was a series. I would so keep reading these. I still intend to read the original stories, but this was great as a visual format to some great classic horror I hadn't yet got around to reading except for one very scary story by Hearn I read in an anthology. If you like Japanese horror movies, check out the source material. Beautiful art with eerie storytelling. I wish this was a series. I would so keep reading these. I still intend to read the original stories, but this was great as a visual format to some great classic horror I hadn't yet got around to reading except for one very scary story by Hearn I read in an anthology. If you like Japanese horror movies, check out the source material.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    It was alright. The art didn't tickle me pink Review to come. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads It was alright. The art didn't tickle me pink Review to come. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    (Received from Netgalley for review.) It would be a mistake to go into this expecting spooky ghost stories. That really isn't the intention, though some of these stories are eerie. Luckily, I had already read Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things, the source for most of these stories, so I knew what to expect. And I really liked Kwaidan, so I was happy at how much of the original phrasing was preserved. The art is very good, and it suits the stories nicely. Really good as a folklore sour (Received from Netgalley for review.) It would be a mistake to go into this expecting spooky ghost stories. That really isn't the intention, though some of these stories are eerie. Luckily, I had already read Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things, the source for most of these stories, so I knew what to expect. And I really liked Kwaidan, so I was happy at how much of the original phrasing was preserved. The art is very good, and it suits the stories nicely. Really good as a folklore source, but not really somewhere to look if you want something spooky.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Riley

    The Faceless Ghost is good starting point for those want to read Japanese ghost story. The book includes well know Snow Woman. The drawing is simple and there is some violence in the book to.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James

    These are classic stories that have appeared in movies and have been readapted many times. Nice art and a decent adaptation to the graphic novel format.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    ARC for Netgalley This certainly proves to be an intriguing and charming tale. Saying that a book of the macabre is charming might seem a bit odd, but the visual styling is simply amazing. For me, this work combines both my personal and professional interests. I work for a Japanese foreign mission and over the last few years have become quite passionate about graphic novels. For almost a decade, I’ve also been intrigued by stories of Yokai and Kaidan which I first learned about while teaching in ARC for Netgalley This certainly proves to be an intriguing and charming tale. Saying that a book of the macabre is charming might seem a bit odd, but the visual styling is simply amazing. For me, this work combines both my personal and professional interests. I work for a Japanese foreign mission and over the last few years have become quite passionate about graphic novels. For almost a decade, I’ve also been intrigued by stories of Yokai and Kaidan which I first learned about while teaching in Japan. This work presents some of Hearn’s (he lived in Japan during the late-19th and early 20th centuries and wrote about/catalogued folk and weird tales) stories in a stunning visual medium. They present a variety of creatures, some of whom are benevolent, others cunning, and some are just plain curious. It illustrates their interactions with the people of Japan from centuries ago which helps create a wonderful mood and atmosphere. Like many folk tales of other cultures, there is usually a nice moral tale or allegory at play; be it being about honesty, greed, loss, love, or playing with powers one shouldn’t. This wonderful compilation highlights some of these themes beautifully and unlike modern horror which can serve to repulse a reader, leaves them rather with a creepy, unsettling, and eerie feeling. Although I do have a small background in Japanese history and culture, I’d recommend this to anyone with a passing interest. It certainly serves as an accessible entry point into the spookier side of Japan and the visual representations certainly make these stories come to life. I can only hope that further volumes are produced.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Wagner

    The story "The Faceless Ghost" is an absolute delight! Every story is pretty enjoyable, but I felt like the artwork and lettering could have been a bit more evocative. The story "The Faceless Ghost" is an absolute delight! Every story is pretty enjoyable, but I felt like the artwork and lettering could have been a bit more evocative.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Interesting set of tales of the supernatural -- some have the predictable flow of a modern urban legend, while others take unexpected directions. The black and white art style is appropriate, clearly inspired by manga but with more play on tone and facial expressions that matches the "macabre" tone of most of the stories. Interesting set of tales of the supernatural -- some have the predictable flow of a modern urban legend, while others take unexpected directions. The black and white art style is appropriate, clearly inspired by manga but with more play on tone and facial expressions that matches the "macabre" tone of most of the stories.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    Was really excited about this book (graphic novel? manga?) when I saw it listed on one of my usual bookstores website. Having already read Kwaidan before I wasn't expecting anything other than satisfying my curiosity about how well adapted the tales were in illustrations, on one hand because I love spooky art and in the other because I was considering getting this as a gift for someone and wanted to see if it was good enough for that. I liked the art style, it wasn't very spooky which actually ra Was really excited about this book (graphic novel? manga?) when I saw it listed on one of my usual bookstores website. Having already read Kwaidan before I wasn't expecting anything other than satisfying my curiosity about how well adapted the tales were in illustrations, on one hand because I love spooky art and in the other because I was considering getting this as a gift for someone and wanted to see if it was good enough for that. I liked the art style, it wasn't very spooky which actually rang true to the original tales, which are more eerie than downright scary. The text was nicely adapted. I didn't go back and compare it to the original text but it felt very close to the words Hearn used. Only critique I have is that in some of the tales it felt like some of the panels could have used more text. One that already knows the story manages to connect the dots on their own but I think a new reader may be pushed back a little when asked to fill those blanks. I would recommend this to teenagers, people that want a quick and easy read, and to those that already are familiar with Hearn's work and want to see someone's take on making them come alive.

  10. 5 out of 5

    LALa

    Love the cover, enjoyed the illustrations and felt like this was a good adaptation of the Japanese tales, I haven't read Hearn's works/translations yet but hope to find copies someday. I have however seen Kwaidan, and other classic Japanese ghost tale which I love and became a more recent interest. I went ahead with reading this to add more eerie fun for before Halloween season ends. While the majority of stories were familiar to me a couple weren't and I found those just as interesting. All in Love the cover, enjoyed the illustrations and felt like this was a good adaptation of the Japanese tales, I haven't read Hearn's works/translations yet but hope to find copies someday. I have however seen Kwaidan, and other classic Japanese ghost tale which I love and became a more recent interest. I went ahead with reading this to add more eerie fun for before Halloween season ends. While the majority of stories were familiar to me a couple weren't and I found those just as interesting. All in all a solid collection and quick read of the macabre. Also give this more of a 3.5.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I loved this collection of Japanese folklore and ghost tales. These stories are from the Japanese text known as the Kwaidan. I believe there's even been a movie made featuring some of these tales. This particular volume is graphic novel format and the material works great in this medium. The art fits the stories perfectly. If you enjoy Japanese folklore and/or manga, this is something you will enjoy, especially during the Halloween season! I loved this collection of Japanese folklore and ghost tales. These stories are from the Japanese text known as the Kwaidan. I believe there's even been a movie made featuring some of these tales. This particular volume is graphic novel format and the material works great in this medium. The art fits the stories perfectly. If you enjoy Japanese folklore and/or manga, this is something you will enjoy, especially during the Halloween season!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tassa DeSalada

    The drama of these legendary Japanese folk tales comes thru in the storytelling and arrangements of the pictures, which is done in classic Japanese art style.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Luna

    Art is good and I liked (enjoyed?) some of the stories but it wasn't as good as I expected. Art is good and I liked (enjoyed?) some of the stories but it wasn't as good as I expected.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Tyler

    Lafcadio Hearn's The Faceless Ghost and Other Macabre Tales from Japan is a collection of six of traditional Japanese ghost stories told in graphic novel format by Sean Michael Wilson. All of them are very well known in Japan, where ghosts and demons are often called yokai, meaning "the mysterious and weird." Today these stories find expression mostly in movies and manga, but they remain rooted in the traditional ghost stories of the Edo era known as kaidan, which means "recited narrative of st Lafcadio Hearn's The Faceless Ghost and Other Macabre Tales from Japan is a collection of six of traditional Japanese ghost stories told in graphic novel format by Sean Michael Wilson. All of them are very well known in Japan, where ghosts and demons are often called yokai, meaning "the mysterious and weird." Today these stories find expression mostly in movies and manga, but they remain rooted in the traditional ghost stories of the Edo era known as kaidan, which means "recited narrative of strange, mysterious, rare, or bewitching apparitions." The book includes an afterword by William Scott Wilson, the esteemed translator and editor of Japanese texts and samurai philosophy, who puts the stories into historical context. Lafcadio Hearn's The Faceless Ghost and Other Macabre Tales from Japan is a good look at some of the traditional stories from Japan. I love learning about the folklore and legends from different parts of the world, and while two of the stories seemed vaguely familiar to me, the complete stories were new to me. I found it fascinating that despite the fact that these are ancient legends from the other side of the world, some ideas are consistent with the urban legends of my own region. I think it is important for readers to see that despite our differences and distance some parts of human existence is shared without ever having crossed paths. The black and white artwork was very well done and captured the emotion and atmosphere of the stories. The collection was a solid read, and while it did not keep me up at night, it certainly had a creepy vibe that stayed with me for a while. Lafcadio Hearn's The Faceless Ghost and Other Macabre Tales from Japan is an interesting and entertaining collection of traditional Japanese ghost stories. I would recommend it to young adults and adults that enjoy ghost stories and legends, particularly those from other cultures.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Harris

    Sean Michael Wilson and illustrator Michiru Morikawa’s adaptation of nineteenth/early twentieth century western student of Japanese culture, Lafcadio Hearn, was a very interesting visual interpretation of the haunting folk stories and legends collected by Hearn. While not quite a “young adult” book, Lafcadio Hearn’s folklore and ghost stories gleaned from his travels across Japan are definitely appropriate for teens, and this comic makes good use of that. While a bit gruesome (with a few severed Sean Michael Wilson and illustrator Michiru Morikawa’s adaptation of nineteenth/early twentieth century western student of Japanese culture, Lafcadio Hearn, was a very interesting visual interpretation of the haunting folk stories and legends collected by Hearn. While not quite a “young adult” book, Lafcadio Hearn’s folklore and ghost stories gleaned from his travels across Japan are definitely appropriate for teens, and this comic makes good use of that. While a bit gruesome (with a few severed heads, torn off ears, etc.) the stories here are eerie and suspenseful, in particular my favorites “Hoichi the Earless,” “Yuki-onna,” and, of course, “The Faceless Ghost.” Morikawa's manga style art offers a fun introduction to these classic tales. For anyone interested in Japanese culture, these manga style adaptations should be very interesting, and introduce younger readers to Japanese history and society in addition to spooky (spooky, spooky) ghosts and other yokai. For more young adult graphic novel adaptations of fantasy literature, check out my BookLikes blog, Reading Rainstorm, here.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    I'm not a big fan of Lafcadio Hearn, a Victorian Gothic writer who translated Japanese tales of the macabre at the turn of the 20th century. I always doubt whether Hearn was true to his sources as his tales of demons, spirits and yokai are so much more gentle than folktales I've become familiarized with through massive amounts of manga. However, these are slightly strange tales, a little odd, hardly macabre, but pleasant enough reading for a slight shiver. The art is much more satisfying and wel I'm not a big fan of Lafcadio Hearn, a Victorian Gothic writer who translated Japanese tales of the macabre at the turn of the 20th century. I always doubt whether Hearn was true to his sources as his tales of demons, spirits and yokai are so much more gentle than folktales I've become familiarized with through massive amounts of manga. However, these are slightly strange tales, a little odd, hardly macabre, but pleasant enough reading for a slight shiver. The art is much more satisfying and well done.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    At first I was put off by what seemed to be too much narration vs. dialogue, but then I read at the end that the editor tried to preserve Hearn's own words as much as possible. There are some wonderful stories in here and Wilson has done a nice job arranging them so that they flow together nicely with one another, ending on a high note. The artwork is quite lovely, enough that the black & white illustrations suit the text just fine. At first I was put off by what seemed to be too much narration vs. dialogue, but then I read at the end that the editor tried to preserve Hearn's own words as much as possible. There are some wonderful stories in here and Wilson has done a nice job arranging them so that they flow together nicely with one another, ending on a high note. The artwork is quite lovely, enough that the black & white illustrations suit the text just fine.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    This collection is the perfect read for anyone interested in folklore, ghost stories, or Japan (or all of the above)! I finished each story wanting more details and more information, but the mystery is part of what makes them so fascinating. Not knowing the answers keeps the reader thinking about these stories long after the book is closed. The artwork is great too. The cover is gorgeous and part of me wished the entire thing had been in color. Overall, a quick and intriguing read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    BookishBat

    As mentioned in the author's note, these stories were long ago collected by the writer Lafcadio Hearn, who lived in Japan in the late 19th Century. Filled with ghosts and other frightening apparitions, these tales are quite dark and unsettling (except for "The Gratitude of the Samebito", which was sweet). The illustrations are haunting and done in the manga style with a bit of Western style thrown in. Very good for those who like macabre Japan. As mentioned in the author's note, these stories were long ago collected by the writer Lafcadio Hearn, who lived in Japan in the late 19th Century. Filled with ghosts and other frightening apparitions, these tales are quite dark and unsettling (except for "The Gratitude of the Samebito", which was sweet). The illustrations are haunting and done in the manga style with a bit of Western style thrown in. Very good for those who like macabre Japan.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    I managed to snag a free copy from one of the VA Guests, and I really dig it. TI know most of the stories [who doesn't], and Wilson’s adaption of them is very easy to read, and Miyabi’s artwork was very done; it blended with the plot styling and just made for a keeper. I managed to snag a free copy from one of the VA Guests, and I really dig it. TI know most of the stories [who doesn't], and Wilson’s adaption of them is very easy to read, and Miyabi’s artwork was very done; it blended with the plot styling and just made for a keeper.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    The artwork resembles classic Japanese art style, quite fitting for these stories. They very well paced, with just the right amount of story being told with pictures and words. Faceless Ghost and Hoichi were esp. well done.

  22. 5 out of 5

    John Shaw

    Filled with terrifying tales of Japanese spirits like all horror stories this book gives great insight into the psyche of the culture that spawned them These tales are of course deeply Japanese and reflect an aspect of the soul of that culture

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emily Bertholf

    This is a beautiful collection of six mysterious folk tales from Japan. The text and artwork complimented each other very well. I agree that if this were a series I would read more, and I will definitely try to check out more of the novels that Wilson and Morikawa have worked on together.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Macabre tales from Japan. Nicely illustrated.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Evans

    Good graphic interpretation of classic Japanese folktales. Plus, it has Hoichi the Earless, one of my favorite tales ever!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Maas

    Incredible! Great artwork, great writing!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jim Kennedy

    Really enjoyed this. More like 3.5 stars. Simple, short folk stories, told well. Recommended.

  28. 5 out of 5

    William Chan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The past, ghosts were myths. It still is today. Ghosts are "supernatural" beings that "float" in the air. They are supposed to imitate the soul of a dead person. There is a legend that "the last thought of the being before death will be granted." In this book, they expressed this phenomenon. Inside 15 short stories, there are different kinds of ghosts. For example, ghosts that remain because of unsatisfied thoughts. There also are some ghosts that have special characters on the back of their hea The past, ghosts were myths. It still is today. Ghosts are "supernatural" beings that "float" in the air. They are supposed to imitate the soul of a dead person. There is a legend that "the last thought of the being before death will be granted." In this book, they expressed this phenomenon. Inside 15 short stories, there are different kinds of ghosts. For example, ghosts that remain because of unsatisfied thoughts. There also are some ghosts that have special characters on the back of their heads that allows the head to detach from the neck. This book has many characters that change after several pages. If you don't like one of the stories, simply try reading the next.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shayna Ross

    A small collection of macabre tales from Japan and ancient Chinese origins to display the various beliefs and superstitions that have traveled through generations over time. These are not meant to be horror, although some are unsettling, but to dictate shared stories through the residents of those times. Nice collection for those interested in the fairy tale type lore as well as an interest in Japanese folk tales.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    I liked the art. I liked the stories. I didn't like the way the stories were told. They were presented straight up, without any tension or build up and then, more often then not, they just ended, or went off on a weird ellipsis. I liked the art. I liked the stories. I didn't like the way the stories were told. They were presented straight up, without any tension or build up and then, more often then not, they just ended, or went off on a weird ellipsis.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.