counter create hit Subjects of Desire: Hegelian Reflections in Twentieth-Century France - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Subjects of Desire: Hegelian Reflections in Twentieth-Century France

Availability: Ready to download

This now classic work by one of the most important philosophers and critics of our time charts the trajectory of desire and its genesis from Hegel's formulation in Phenomenology of Spirit through its appropriation by Kojeve, Hyppolite, Sartre, Lacan, Deleuze, and Foucault, presenting how French reception of Hegel posed successive challenges to his metaphysics and view of t This now classic work by one of the most important philosophers and critics of our time charts the trajectory of desire and its genesis from Hegel's formulation in Phenomenology of Spirit through its appropriation by Kojeve, Hyppolite, Sartre, Lacan, Deleuze, and Foucault, presenting how French reception of Hegel posed successive challenges to his metaphysics and view of the subject and revealed ambiguities within his position. Subjects of Desire provides a sophisticated account of the post-Hegelian tradition that has predominated in modern France and remains timely in thinking about contemporary debates concerning desire, the unconscious, subjection, and the subject.


Compare

This now classic work by one of the most important philosophers and critics of our time charts the trajectory of desire and its genesis from Hegel's formulation in Phenomenology of Spirit through its appropriation by Kojeve, Hyppolite, Sartre, Lacan, Deleuze, and Foucault, presenting how French reception of Hegel posed successive challenges to his metaphysics and view of t This now classic work by one of the most important philosophers and critics of our time charts the trajectory of desire and its genesis from Hegel's formulation in Phenomenology of Spirit through its appropriation by Kojeve, Hyppolite, Sartre, Lacan, Deleuze, and Foucault, presenting how French reception of Hegel posed successive challenges to his metaphysics and view of the subject and revealed ambiguities within his position. Subjects of Desire provides a sophisticated account of the post-Hegelian tradition that has predominated in modern France and remains timely in thinking about contemporary debates concerning desire, the unconscious, subjection, and the subject.

30 review for Subjects of Desire: Hegelian Reflections in Twentieth-Century France

  1. 4 out of 5

    Goatboy

    This is a really interesting and well written journey using the theme of Desire to travel from Hegel to Foucault, by way of many of France's most important philosophers and thinkers. It was a journey alternating through clear skies and foggy valleys for me, as some sections would hit spot on and others felt too over my head to truly feel I was understanding properly. Worthwhile and recommended overall though! Fascinating to read how different thinkers took the concept of Desire and warped or adj This is a really interesting and well written journey using the theme of Desire to travel from Hegel to Foucault, by way of many of France's most important philosophers and thinkers. It was a journey alternating through clear skies and foggy valleys for me, as some sections would hit spot on and others felt too over my head to truly feel I was understanding properly. Worthwhile and recommended overall though! Fascinating to read how different thinkers took the concept of Desire and warped or adjusted it to their own thinking and systems.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    Revised from Judy B's 1984 Yale philosophy dissertation. It's interesting to see the intellectual context that allowed Butler to think Gender Trouble, published the following year, and you can see some of the germs of those ideas popping up briefly here in unexpected places. Also, this convinced me that I absolutely needed to read Hegel. The book is, of course, dense and slow-going, perhaps even more than Butler's later work, but definitely recommended for theory nerds. Especially worth taking a Revised from Judy B's 1984 Yale philosophy dissertation. It's interesting to see the intellectual context that allowed Butler to think Gender Trouble, published the following year, and you can see some of the germs of those ideas popping up briefly here in unexpected places. Also, this convinced me that I absolutely needed to read Hegel. The book is, of course, dense and slow-going, perhaps even more than Butler's later work, but definitely recommended for theory nerds. Especially worth taking a look at are the overview in C.1 of Hegel's view of the subject in Phenomenology of the Spirit and the C.4 discussion of Hegel's anti/influence on theorists who we would more likely label as precursors to queer theory: Foucault, Lacan, Deleuze, and Kristeva.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I think I want to write something substantive on Butler, and want to do my homework; I've never read her stuff before Gender Trouble (except for that curious early piece on sadomasochism . . . ) I think I want to write something substantive on Butler, and want to do my homework; I've never read her stuff before Gender Trouble (except for that curious early piece on sadomasochism . . . )

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Really enjoyed this book... great secondary text for Hegel scholars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gabe

    a less cited work from Butler's corpus, which traces many of the now (in)famous poststructuralist visionaries (Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze, etc.) with the eyes of an emerging feminist. as her PhD dissertation, this text demonstrated the rigor of a thinker not only at ease with the continental heavyweights (with an obvious focus on Hegel and the well-known secondary works of Kojeve and Hyppolite), but eager to turn age-old notions on their head. tearing into the motif of "Desire" in Hegel's Phenom a less cited work from Butler's corpus, which traces many of the now (in)famous poststructuralist visionaries (Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze, etc.) with the eyes of an emerging feminist. as her PhD dissertation, this text demonstrated the rigor of a thinker not only at ease with the continental heavyweights (with an obvious focus on Hegel and the well-known secondary works of Kojeve and Hyppolite), but eager to turn age-old notions on their head. tearing into the motif of "Desire" in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit, she immediately proposes that this existential and creative impulse (something akin to Nietzsche's will to power) not be taken as some transcendental essence. rather, we must situate this Desire as a contingent, multivalent force. or at the very least, interrogate the very desires that underpin such essentialist claims. it is a thorough tour de force that greatly assisted in my education on the history of the continental tradition. highly recommend to any and all with a sense that there is still room for Hegelian thinking in current discourse. one particularly beautiful passage (which, now that I'm returning to it, reminds me quite a bit of Zizek's notion of parallax): "The deceptive pursuit of the Absolute is not a vain 'running around in circles,' but a progressive cycle which reveals every deception as permitting some grander act of synthesis, an insight into yet more regions of interrelated reality. The substance that is known, and which the subject is, is thus an all-encompassing web of interrelations, the dynamism of life itself, and, consequently, the principle that all specific determinations are not what they appear to be." (22-23)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jemma Dixon

    Lucid, creative, practical, poetic - I’m in awe of Butler. Haven’t finished the entirety of the book but it’ll be useful to dip in and out of re desire and figuring out post-Hegelian dialectics on the philosophies of desire.

  7. 4 out of 5

    doreflux

    Butler is spot on in giving the subject of desire a narrative (via Hegel through Foucault and Deleuze by way of Sartre). This tragi-comic figure (the subject) can only be pitied in her doggedness.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pope-punk

    Brilliantly readable. I had some reservations going into this because of the stereotyped versions of Butler's prose I'd heard horror stories about, but this is just about as clear a book about Hegel could possibly be without losing any of the dialectical flexibility. Definitely recommend to anyone who wants to know about 20th century continental philosophy outside of the phenomenonological->postmodernist lineage, and also interesting to see Butler (who definitely fits within the aforementioned m Brilliantly readable. I had some reservations going into this because of the stereotyped versions of Butler's prose I'd heard horror stories about, but this is just about as clear a book about Hegel could possibly be without losing any of the dialectical flexibility. Definitely recommend to anyone who wants to know about 20th century continental philosophy outside of the phenomenonological->postmodernist lineage, and also interesting to see Butler (who definitely fits within the aforementioned milieu) demonstrate such effortless knowledge thereof.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leonardo

    Catherine Malabou nos llama a abandonar la postura crítica hacia la realidad como el horizonte definitivo de nuestro pensamiento, sea cual sea el nombre bajo el que aparece, desde la «crítica crítica» de los jóvenes hegelianos, hasta la teoría crítica del siglo XX. El año que soñamos peligrosamente Pág.109 Catherine Malabou nos llama a abandonar la postura crítica hacia la realidad como el horizonte definitivo de nuestro pensamiento, sea cual sea el nombre bajo el que aparece, desde la «crítica crítica» de los jóvenes hegelianos, hasta la teoría crítica del siglo XX. El año que soñamos peligrosamente Pág.109

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna Stein

    Necessary, but not Butler at her full-Butler; more than usual, it takes her a long time to get to her own claims or additions to the plethora of thinkers(') she summarizes. It's seems more of an impressive showing of her reading of Hegel (namely), Lacan, and Derrida-- but it's mostly interesting to see her so attached to Sartre before she transitions, beyond return for the rest of her career, to post structure and psychoanalysis. Necessary, but not Butler at her full-Butler; more than usual, it takes her a long time to get to her own claims or additions to the plethora of thinkers(') she summarizes. It's seems more of an impressive showing of her reading of Hegel (namely), Lacan, and Derrida-- but it's mostly interesting to see her so attached to Sartre before she transitions, beyond return for the rest of her career, to post structure and psychoanalysis.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Woke

    Decent primer on the 20th Century French reception of Hegel, beginning with Kojeve's influential "end of history" reading of the Phenomenology, to Sartre, Lacan, and the big poststructuralists, Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze. Decent primer on the 20th Century French reception of Hegel, beginning with Kojeve's influential "end of history" reading of the Phenomenology, to Sartre, Lacan, and the big poststructuralists, Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Castro

    El mejor libro de Judith Butler con mucha diferencia. Si dudas entre todos los que tiene mejor quédate con este.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joni

    rootwork on the gravediggers. dig in

  14. 5 out of 5

    interwovenplexus

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rambling Reader

  16. 5 out of 5

    Philip Jenks

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  18. 4 out of 5

    John

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cai

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sole

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emilia Almanza

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anemtoacei

  23. 4 out of 5

    Martin raba

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anton

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jonas Renault

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jaycob Izso

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joshua F

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ramon

  29. 4 out of 5

    Promise Li

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Holden

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.