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Keeping Faith: Memoirs of a President

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In Keeping Faith, originally published in 1982, President Carter provides a candid account of his time in the Oval Office, detailing the hostage crisis in Iran, his triumph at the Camp David Middle East peace summit, his relationships with world leaders, and even glimpses into his private world. “Responsible, truthful, intelligent, earnest, rational, purposeful. Thus the m In Keeping Faith, originally published in 1982, President Carter provides a candid account of his time in the Oval Office, detailing the hostage crisis in Iran, his triumph at the Camp David Middle East peace summit, his relationships with world leaders, and even glimpses into his private world. “Responsible, truthful, intelligent, earnest, rational, purposeful. Thus the man: thus the book” (The Washington Post).


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In Keeping Faith, originally published in 1982, President Carter provides a candid account of his time in the Oval Office, detailing the hostage crisis in Iran, his triumph at the Camp David Middle East peace summit, his relationships with world leaders, and even glimpses into his private world. “Responsible, truthful, intelligent, earnest, rational, purposeful. Thus the m In Keeping Faith, originally published in 1982, President Carter provides a candid account of his time in the Oval Office, detailing the hostage crisis in Iran, his triumph at the Camp David Middle East peace summit, his relationships with world leaders, and even glimpses into his private world. “Responsible, truthful, intelligent, earnest, rational, purposeful. Thus the man: thus the book” (The Washington Post).

55 review for Keeping Faith: Memoirs of a President

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mikey B.

    This is a well written book of his presidential years. The man comes off as forthright. It is not entirely a chronological re-telling of those years – some of the events or his major legislation is told within that context – such as the revision to the Panama Canal Treaty and his genuine pursuit for conservation of energy and fuel consumption. He recalls all these logically and elaborates on the pitfalls he encountered. It is amazing how any bill or legislation can get passed in the United State This is a well written book of his presidential years. The man comes off as forthright. It is not entirely a chronological re-telling of those years – some of the events or his major legislation is told within that context – such as the revision to the Panama Canal Treaty and his genuine pursuit for conservation of energy and fuel consumption. He recalls all these logically and elaborates on the pitfalls he encountered. It is amazing how any bill or legislation can get passed in the United States – needing the approval of both the Senate and Congress. Jimmy Carter describes the ignorance of some Congressman who disparaged the country of Panama when the Treaty was up for approval. The entire country of Panama was following this avidly only to hear some American Congressman publicly ridiculing their country – another example of American self-centredness. It must always be remembered that Jimmy Carter was the first American President who brought energy conservation and oil consumption in particular, to the forefront of the nation’s consciousness. He also conveyed human rights issues. Perhaps this was somewhat naïve, but at least it was a worthy effort. The Reagan years followed - energy conservation was abandoned and lavish spending was encouraged on the military (which Jimmy Carter opposed) and the economy was de-regulated for which we are now paying a horrible price. If one now compares the Carter years with the Reagan ones - Reagan is seen as living entirely in the moment with no concern for the future. President Carter faced terrible problems during his years in power – the Iran hostage crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. The Soviet incursion stymied his efforts for nuclear de-escalation (the SALT talks). He seems somewhat awkward as to events in Iran prior to the hostage taking – his ambassador Sullivan was informing him that the Ayatollah was being favoured to replace the Shah. President Carter did not seem to be listening and reacting to this very carefully. From a geo-political point of view it is interesting that after the Shah took power in Iran the Soviet Union invaded their neighbour Afghanistan. Could this be viewed as an attempt by the Soviets to stop the spread of religious fundamentalism on their borders? Over one hundred pages are devoted to the peace talks with Sadat and Begin. Even after the talks were completed it took several months of follow-thru by the President to ensure “success” – even so, not all the passages of the Treaty were implemented. Maybe on this occasion (and a few others) President Carter put too much of himself into the task. Did he have a problem delegating? The book is filled with many personal observations on the many personalities he met – Brezhnev, Sadat, Begin, Deng Xiao Ping. It is a delight to read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dean Cummings

    In the preface, entitled “A First Word,” Carter tells us that at the end of his presidency, one of the key things he took home with him was a 5000 page diary containing his day-to-day writings of the happenings of his four years as president. Once he had settled back into his private life, he began re-reading what he’d written about the years of 1977 to 1981, the span of time he and his family spent at the White House. Shortly after reflecting on this diary, he decided to begin writing a memoir. In the preface, entitled “A First Word,” Carter tells us that at the end of his presidency, one of the key things he took home with him was a 5000 page diary containing his day-to-day writings of the happenings of his four years as president. Once he had settled back into his private life, he began re-reading what he’d written about the years of 1977 to 1981, the span of time he and his family spent at the White House. Shortly after reflecting on this diary, he decided to begin writing a memoir. He summarized the reason for the book in the following way: “This is not a history of my administration but a highly personal report of my own experiences.” After reading this, the word that stood out for me was “personal,” which fit with his last statement of the preface: This book, “May even be helpful to the reader in giving a more accurate picture of the kind of person I am.” As I read these opening pages, I realized that my early impression of Carter’s book was going to match my long-held view of him as a genuine, plainspoken, down-to-earth person. In my opinion, he best demonstrated these personal characteristics through a desire to live his life “close to people,” both as a man, and as I discovered when reading this book, as a president. It’s a personal account of what was for a four-year period, a very public life. That feeling began on day one of his presidency: “The inaugural parade route stretched before us with tens of thousands of people lining the streets. I leaned forward and told the Secret Service driver to stop the automobile, then touch Rosalynn’s hand and said, ‘Let’s go!’ the security men looked all around, saw only friendly faces, and opened the doors of the long black limousine. As we stepped into the street, the people seemed anxious and concerned about us. They obviously thought something was wrong with the car. Then out three sons and their wives joined us as we began to walk down the center of the broad avenue. It seemed that a shock wave went through the crowd. There were gasps of astonishment and cries of, ‘They’re walking!’ ‘They’re walking!’ The excitement flooded over us; we responded to the people with broad smiles and proud steps. It was bitterly cold, but we felt warn inside. Even our nine-year-old daughter Amy got the spirit, walking in front of our family group and carefully placing her small feet on the white centerline. We were surprised at the depth of feeling from our friends along the way. Some of them wept openly, and when I saw this, a few tears of joy ran down my cold cheeks. It was one of those few perfect moments in life when everything seems absolutely right.” And even when Carter was choosing his vice-presidential running mate, Walter “Fritz” Mondale, he described the process as “very personal and private.” I was also impressed when I read that as president, Carter was determined to establish a very close relationship with Mondale, and that he wished for him to be closely involved in the presidential duties so that he would be ready, should the circumstances arise, to step into the job immediately. The first practical step toward that goal was to relocate the Vice President’s personal office from the Old Executive Office Building (now referred to the Eisenhower Executive Office Building) to the West Wing of the White House, which was much closer to the center of activity in the Oval Office. This just made sense to me. I’ve always thought that every president and Vice president should operate in a close working relationship, but as I read more and more history of the Presidents of the United States, I quickly learned that this was not true for many pat administrations. The fact that Jimmy Carter made this a priority, spoke volumes as to his intent to empower Vice President Mondale as much as possible. Carter even managed to apply his “practical personal touch” when choosing members of his cabinet as well. I started seeing a trend here. President Carter strove to be a man who governed by “seeing people,” taking a hands-on approach to finding solutions to problems, and not forgetting who it was that he was working for, the American people. This desire was evident as he was crisscrossing the country, running for the nation’s highest office, describing the process as his “Graduate Course in America,” here is what he said about what he did in the campaign: “I spent as much time as possible in close proximity to Americans. In the streets, in the factories, in the farms and in the kitchens and livestock auction barns.” As I read this, I couldn’t help imagining how great this would be if today’s political candidates were to adopt a posture of being “servant leaders” who keep themselves close to the people that they should be serving as national leaders. I also believe that the way in which a leader “frames” the position of those to report to him or her has a great impact on how the person carries out their duties. One example of this in the Carter Administration was that he asked his Secretary of State, Cyrus Vance to see himself as a “foreign policy educator” to the American people. This suggestion greatly affected how Vance did his job, especially by making the American people feel “in partnership” with the State Department. And as it turned out, Cyrus Vance was a fine teacher! I think that one of the most important aspects of this is that it helps bring the complexity of the federal government departments and agencies “down to earth” and understandable for all of us. As I read this, I recalled how many times I researched a subject using a “Children’s Encyclopedia” because it gave me the most important information without “muddying” my understanding through overt complexity. Carter’s telling of the Panama Canal Treaty was dramatic reading indeed! Not only does he give us an understandable, highly readable account of the ups and downs of this groundbreaking agreement between the U.S.A. and Panama, but he also gives ample credit to the legislators who courageously voted in favor of the bill despite forceful and sustained opposition. Consistent with Carter’s style in other areas, he continues to desire to bring his case “to the people,” as well as place his key officials in the role of “educator.” This time it was various State Department officials, including Secretary Cyrus Vance, that hosted more than 1,500 appearances across the nation to a variety of groups. This immense effort to bring a longstanding agreement to a facility so commercially critical, and so awe inspiring that the American Society of Civil Engineers referred to it as, “one of the seven wonders of the modern world.” After learning more about the canal, I agree with the engineers, and after reading the president’s account of the passing of the bill, it looked as if it would take an out of this world effort to bring agreement between all parties. As I read this book, I gained a perspective on the way Carter’s “common touch” with the people of the United States was also in evidence in the bonds he made with other world leaders. The Western impression of the leadership of the People’s Republic of China has been one likening them to “communist hardliners,” but in Carter’s memoir, we see a charming, warm, fair-minded Chairman Deng Xiaoping, a man who worked with Carter to normalize relations between the U.S.A. and the P.R.C. It was a tricky negotiation, especially considering the “Taiwan issue,” but real gains were made in the relationship of these two countries. It was moving to read Carter’s account of Deng’s visit to Washington, one that was socially delightful and fruitful from a negotiation standpoint. The president reflected on his memories of Deng’s visit, summing up his feelings this way: “I then learned why some people say the Chinese are the most civilized people in the world.” And when it came to relations with other world leaders, things took more time. Such was the case with General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Leonid Brezhnev. And if the initial connection was not as immediately warm as that of the PRC leader’s it was intriguing and at time humorous nonetheless, what with Brezhnev himself introducing the Almighty into his initial conversation with President Carter, to the “after meeting” musings of Carter’s National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski, describing the history of Soviet Chairmen this way: “Under Lenin the Soviet Union was like a religious revival, under Stalin like a prison, under Khrushchev like a circus, and under Brezhnev like the U.S. Post Office.” I found this quote amusing and somewhat prophetic as I read the later accounts of the American negotiations with the Soviet leadership. The focus of the Vienna, Austria based meetings were the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty, (S.A.L.T. 2), a tough and mind numbingly detailed series of talks aimed at nuclear arms reduction, but despite the challenges, and setbacks, progress was made and part of it was, in my opinion, President Carter’s talent for finding “common ground” with others. And then there were the most special relationships Carter formed with other world leaders, including Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. And if the trusting bond forged between these two men in the midst of very difficult times in the Middle East was not inspiring enough, then the telling of Sadat’s bold announcement to the Egyptian Parliament that he was going to Jerusalem to meet with Prime Minister Menachem Begin certainly was. Carter described his first meeting with Sadat as the “best day of his presidency.” We read that despite the courage and foresight of Sadat and Begin, they alone would be unable to solve the deeply intrenched challenges between Israel and Palestine and that most of the leaders of the Arab world were of the opinion that the U.S.A. needed to stay involved in the talks. Carter did such a good job of framing this important chapter in history. He chose to tell the story through the lens of the humanity of the players involved, which helped the reader better appreciate the proclivities of the key players and the context of the negotiations themselves, since many of the most important points of discussion were related to where and how people in the region lived. To give an example of just how personal those 13 days of negotiations became, Carter relates a touching moment he shared with Israel’s Prime Minister Menachem Begin. There were serious problems with the Israelis concerning the “Jerusalem section” of the peace agreement. Up to this point, Carter had established a very close and trusting relationship with Egyptian President Sadat, but his relationship with Begin was not as close. Then this moment happened: “Earlier, my secretary, Susan Clough, had brought me some photographs of Begin, Sadat, and me. They had already been signed by President Sadat, and Prime Minister Begin had requested that I autograph them for his grandchildren. Knowing the trouble, we were in with the Israelis, Susan suggested that she go and get the actual names of the grandchildren, so that I could personalize each picture. I did this and walked over to Begin’s cabin with them. He was sitting on the front porch, very distraught and nervous because the talks had finally broken down at the last minute. I handed him the photographs. He took them and thanked me. Then he happened to look down and saw that his granddaughter’s name was on the top one. He spoke it aloud, and then looked at each photograph individually, repeating the name of the grandchild I had written on it. His lips trembled, and tears welled up in his eyes. He told me a little about each child, and especially about the one who seemed to b his favorite. We were both emotional as we talked quietly for a few minutes about grandchildren and about war.” Carter then spoke about walking back to his cabin after this heartfelt talk with Begin, wishing there was some way to move the “Jerusalem section” forward. Shortly after arriving at his cabin, his phone rang, it was Begin: “I will accept the letter you have drafted on Jerusalem,” he said, much to the amazement and delight of the President. It was Carter’s telling of stories like these that reminded me how personal politics and political leadership, even at the highest levels, can be. Carter did not shy away from sharing details of the lowest points of his presidency and his failures to resolve certain issues. One such low point happened on Sunday, November 4, 1979 when the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, Iran was overrun by radical students, resulting in the capture of 52 Americans. The negotiations for the release of these hostages was an arduous and painfully detailed process, much of it negotiated through third parties. Carter’s account of it was as painful as it was dramatic. And if the successful signing of the Panama Canal and Egypt-Israel Peace Treaties were Economic and International Peace highpoints, then the passage of the bill to protect more than 150 million acres of land in Alaska was a major environmental win for Carter’s Administration. Overall, this was a very readable and inspiring memoir of a man who was committed to peace, human rights, nuclear arms control, energy challenges, welfare and tax reform, environmental stewardship and the efficient and “moral fiber” of government. One of the finest tributes to Carter and his administration came from the Soviet and Russian cellist and conductor Slava Rostropovich as he commented on Carter’s 1980 presidential election defeat. He spoke of the historical fact that the masses of people were often wrong and that what was significant was the personal relationship that developed between leaders or performers or artists and others. He said that the Carter’s meant more to him and his family than anyone in the United States when they arrived from the Soviet Union. He pointed out that the masses made a mistake on November 4th, as they had when they rejected Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, rejected La Traviata, and in the first performance of Tosca the audience reacted against it so violently that they couldn’t even raise the curtain for the third act. He said history was going to treat Carter’s Administration the same way they did Verdi, Puccini, and Beethoven. “It was beautiful.” It was exactly how I felt as I finished reading one of the most hopeful and energizing memoirs I’d ever read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kristyn

    very well-written and engaging memoirs. i liked the organization, which was by issue rather than a straight chronology. i expected this to be a slog that would take some time (i'm looking at you, clinton's autobio), but it was very readable, and i found myself staying up late to finish chapters.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jason Chambers

    Carter's memoir was fascinating and contrasted others in that he was much more open about mistakes made and his decision making processes. It reads much more like a neighbor telling you a story than a statesman reviewing his career, and in a good way. I also prefer the memoirs that focus on specific events and large decisions made, and Carter sticks to that format without getting too bogged down in daily details (like Clinton and Nixon tend to in their memoirs).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    This is certainly not the most gripping thing I've ever read, but I don't know that I've ever read anything that I've learned more from. From the way the political system actually works, to how to negotiate treaties, this book lays it all out. It further adds to my support for Jimmy Carter as an exemplary human being.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    President Jimmy Carter's 1st hand account of his presidency. Particularly interesting when he takes you inside the delicate peace negotiations between him, Prime Minister Begin of Israel and Anwar Sadat of Egypt. Also tells the beginnings of our continuing troubles with Iran,as he describes the taking of hostages from our embassy in Iran and the failed rescue mission he authorized.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    This was a good overview memoir of some of the bigger topics during Jimmy Carter's time as president: the Iran hostages, Middle East peace, the Soviet Union, China, the economy, the environment, etc. Rather than being chronological, the book is broken up by topics: a section about China, a section about the Panama Canal, a major section about the hostages, on and on. This was a good and bad way to lay out the book: on the one hand, it made it easier for the reader to focus on one topic, and all This was a good overview memoir of some of the bigger topics during Jimmy Carter's time as president: the Iran hostages, Middle East peace, the Soviet Union, China, the economy, the environment, etc. Rather than being chronological, the book is broken up by topics: a section about China, a section about the Panama Canal, a major section about the hostages, on and on. This was a good and bad way to lay out the book: on the one hand, it made it easier for the reader to focus on one topic, and all of the intricacies that came about as time went on; on the other hand, I sometimes got confused about all of the different things going on at one time -- I forgot that the world wasn't put on hold until the China issue was resolved, and then *just* the Camp David Accords. It must be hard to be President.

  8. 4 out of 5

    David

    I admire President Carter more with each passing year, and I'm still proud to have voted for him in the first presidential election in which I could vote. I was a junior in college, about to turn 21, and I went to my polling place and stood in line for about an hour to vote. His memoirs of his presidency demonstrate the integrity of the man I supported in 1980.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Wayne

    I couldn't finish it. All politics aside, I just didn't find the book well written.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Landry

    Fascinating read for presidential history/political history folks but probably not one that I'd recommend a person pick up and read in general. It is interesting to read Carter's perspective on his presidency, and I'd like to read more of his memoirs to see if he returns to any of the reflections that he touched on in this memoir and, if so, if they change over time. The most exciting part to me was the details of the Camp David summit. It was fascinating to read about the back and forth of the Fascinating read for presidential history/political history folks but probably not one that I'd recommend a person pick up and read in general. It is interesting to read Carter's perspective on his presidency, and I'd like to read more of his memoirs to see if he returns to any of the reflections that he touched on in this memoir and, if so, if they change over time. The most exciting part to me was the details of the Camp David summit. It was fascinating to read about the back and forth of the top level negotiations and how conducting the public business became so personal for the individuals involved. Well-written and thoughtful, but as with many memoirs, there is a bias that is to be expected. Overall, if you're interested in Carter, it's a good read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    As one could expect, very heavy on the Middle East.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    JImmy Carter is a true peacekeeper and and a better example of his faith in action is inspiring.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Graney

    Detailed, interesting. Much better than Clinton's, Reagan's and Nixon's.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Adde

    A true proponent for peacekeeping, that is why he is a hero to me. A generous and kind man, and one who I met while he signed this very book for me in 1983. God bless you Jimmy Carter.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    I wish that our 39th president had included a bit on his life before the presidency in this memoir of his four White House years. Might have provided greater insights into these years. Jimmy Carter came out of nowhere when after Watergate, America was looking for some fresh faces and new leadership. Carter was just about everybody's second choice and managed to forge a path between better known contenders. He had a tough general election, much tougher than expected when he defeated Gerald R. Ford. Ji I wish that our 39th president had included a bit on his life before the presidency in this memoir of his four White House years. Might have provided greater insights into these years. Jimmy Carter came out of nowhere when after Watergate, America was looking for some fresh faces and new leadership. Carter was just about everybody's second choice and managed to forge a path between better known contenders. He had a tough general election, much tougher than expected when he defeated Gerald R. Ford. Jimmy Carter came in touting the fact he was a Washington, DC outsider and spent four years proving exactly that. His relations with Congressional Democrats were bad. Very little of his domestic agenda got passed during his tenure. Carter did much better in foreign policy. Under Carter we finished what Nixon started and formally recognized the People's Republic of China. About time the myth of Cjhiang Kai-Shek 'liberating' China was put to rest. We no longer looked like fools on that question. A great deal of the book is taken up with the Camp David accords as Carter invited Anwar Sadat of Egypt and Menachem Begin of Israel and signed those historic accords. An Arab nation finally acknowledged Israel's right to exist. The return of the Panama Canal is also dealt with in great detail. It was a great engineering achievement, but a great bit of embarrassment from an age of jingoism. We are now where we should be, tenants of the sovereign state of Panama. No president ever ran under the hardship of something like the Iran hostage crisis. Militant Islam running amuck after the Shah was overthrown. After the rescue attempt failed I think Jimmy Carter was doomed in the 1980 campaign against Ronald Reagan. One thing more. It was under Carter that human rights became an issue and something we can and should base foreign policy. Dealing with the apartheid regime in South Africa, something Carter was reluctant to do. Nations were taken to task by this president as they never were before and in some cases since. It was nice to get to know Jimmy Carter the president. I just wished the book was more encompassing of his whole life before the White House years.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Honesty and reality ....it has been a great privilege to hang out with Jimmy these past few weeks. It's been an honor Mr. President. This is a great read...not action packed but a total fascinating read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maria Beatrice

    I seem to be one of the few who found the book utterly boring. Perhaps because I have always admired Carter, I felt a greater disappointment

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mmiller400m

    The book gets a 3, the president gets a 4.5. I gained a lot of respect for Jimmy Carter by reading this book and I can't help but think what might have happened if he had been able to serve a 2nd term. Maybe Reagan would have faded away and never ran again. Maybe the Cold War could have ended even sooner. Maybe his efforts in the Middle East would have continued and we would have an entirely different situation in that region of the world than what we're left with 36 years after he left office. The book gets a 3, the president gets a 4.5. I gained a lot of respect for Jimmy Carter by reading this book and I can't help but think what might have happened if he had been able to serve a 2nd term. Maybe Reagan would have faded away and never ran again. Maybe the Cold War could have ended even sooner. Maybe his efforts in the Middle East would have continued and we would have an entirely different situation in that region of the world than what we're left with 36 years after he left office. This is the 6th book I've read in my efforts to read backwards through the presidents. I must say that I'm inclined to pause before moving on to Ford and read another book or two by Carter. He is very interesting to me as a person and I'd like to learn a lot more. I understand why he lost the election. The hostage crisis had just gone on too long. I think if the extraction mission wouldn't have been aborted we would have succeeded and it would have been enough to bring him back. One thing that sticks with me is how Billy Carter was covered. A lot was made of his supposedly antisemitic comments when saying 'there are a lot more arabs than jews' or something to that effect. Compared to some of the things coming out of our Republican nominee this year, that seems pretty darn tame.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Curtis

  20. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Amador

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sheryl

  22. 4 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Fitzgerald

  24. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Mariano

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tripp

  27. 4 out of 5

    Deepak

  28. 5 out of 5

    Willis Whitlock

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jerewv

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  31. 4 out of 5

    The

  32. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Gilbert

  33. 5 out of 5

    Bill Lee

  34. 4 out of 5

    Marty

  35. 4 out of 5

    Michele

  36. 5 out of 5

    Marcella

  37. 5 out of 5

    Barbara (Barb)

  38. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

  39. 5 out of 5

    Meagan

  40. 5 out of 5

    Geoffery

  41. 5 out of 5

    Anita

  42. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  43. 5 out of 5

    Eric Leuliette

  44. 4 out of 5

    Fadi

  45. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

  46. 5 out of 5

    Richard Bauer

  47. 4 out of 5

    Evan

  48. 4 out of 5

    Sally

  49. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  50. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  51. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

  52. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  53. 4 out of 5

    Tina

  54. 5 out of 5

    Colin

  55. 5 out of 5

    Jae1967 Eaves

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