counter create hit Chainmail Bikini: The Anthology of Women Gamers - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Chainmail Bikini: The Anthology of Women Gamers

Availability: Ready to download

Chainmail Bikini is an anthology of comics by and about female gamers! 40 cartoonists have contributed comics about the games they’re passionate about—from video games to table-top role-playing to collectible card games. The comics in Chainmail Bikini explore the real-life impact of entering a fantasy world, how games can connect us with each other and teach us about ourse Chainmail Bikini is an anthology of comics by and about female gamers! 40 cartoonists have contributed comics about the games they’re passionate about—from video games to table-top role-playing to collectible card games. The comics in Chainmail Bikini explore the real-life impact of entering a fantasy world, how games can connect us with each other and teach us about ourselves.


Compare
Ads Banner

Chainmail Bikini is an anthology of comics by and about female gamers! 40 cartoonists have contributed comics about the games they’re passionate about—from video games to table-top role-playing to collectible card games. The comics in Chainmail Bikini explore the real-life impact of entering a fantasy world, how games can connect us with each other and teach us about ourse Chainmail Bikini is an anthology of comics by and about female gamers! 40 cartoonists have contributed comics about the games they’re passionate about—from video games to table-top role-playing to collectible card games. The comics in Chainmail Bikini explore the real-life impact of entering a fantasy world, how games can connect us with each other and teach us about ourselves.

30 review for Chainmail Bikini: The Anthology of Women Gamers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    I loved this! Tons of queer and trans contributors, lots of different takes on gaming, a wide variety of art styles. Highly recommend.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    Chainmail Bikini, as the subtitle says, is an anthology of comics revolving around the theme of women in gaming. Pretty much all types of gaming are represented, board and card games, computer and video games, tabletop RPGs, LARPs … The overall tone of the book is empowering. “Gaming made me the success I am today” is a recurring theme. Stories range from autobiography to more poetic and allegorical pieces. In all, it's an impressive array of talent. Probably the most memorable story for me was Chainmail Bikini, as the subtitle says, is an anthology of comics revolving around the theme of women in gaming. Pretty much all types of gaming are represented, board and card games, computer and video games, tabletop RPGs, LARPs … The overall tone of the book is empowering. “Gaming made me the success I am today” is a recurring theme. Stories range from autobiography to more poetic and allegorical pieces. In all, it's an impressive array of talent. Probably the most memorable story for me was “Absolute Dominion” by Diana Nock, but that's largely due to Dominion being one of my favorite games. In general, I enjoyed this book quite a bit, but I’m a gamer, so I’m certainly biased. All in all, this is a decent alt comics anthology. Recommended!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Content: Lots of good, some not as good. On the plus side, everything's short, so the less good stuff is over quickly; on the minus side, everything's short, so the good stuff is over too quickly. This is mostly interesting on merit, because it's women making comics about games, and that's (to my knowledge) not a project that has previously existed. There are voices in here that aren't heard in other places, and I think that's awesome.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Val

    I really loved this collection of women's experiences with games and in different gaming communities. Not gonna lie, I even cried at some of the stories because they were so similar (and true) to my own experiences and thoughts. I also especially enjoyed the inclusion of trans women and non-binary femme storytellers in this gendered anthology, they need to be included more! :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Beth Cato

    I supported the Kickstarter for this, and I was happy to have the final result arrive this week. It took me a little over an hour to read, and I found it thoughtful, engaging, and laugh-out-loud amusing at times. The focus is on women gamers, and there are also several strips that delve into gender identity; the universal theme is a sense of belonging through gaming, whether it's Pokemon, AD&D, or LARPing. Since it has over 40 contributors, there's a lot of variety and diversity; that meant that I supported the Kickstarter for this, and I was happy to have the final result arrive this week. It took me a little over an hour to read, and I found it thoughtful, engaging, and laugh-out-loud amusing at times. The focus is on women gamers, and there are also several strips that delve into gender identity; the universal theme is a sense of belonging through gaming, whether it's Pokemon, AD&D, or LARPing. Since it has over 40 contributors, there's a lot of variety and diversity; that meant that even if some artwork of subject matter didn't grab me, that would likely change with the next comic. Some of my favorite sections were "She's the Backbone of This Facility" by Laura Lannes (a thoughtful analysis of Portal 2's feminist themes), "Achievement Unlocked" by Jade F. Lee, "Here Comes a New Challenger" by Kinoko Evans, and "Hermia" by Miranda Harmon (*sniff*). When you support a Kickstarter, you're never quite sure how the end product will turn out, but I think this is excellent. Sure, I wish some of my own influential games had been shown more (Final Fantasy and Dragon Warrior/Quest series), but at the same time, I was charmed to see how games like Pokemon and Animal Crossing influenced this generation of artists.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    2 1/2 stars Overall, I was not impressed with this. It was a jumble of very short stories (3-6 pages) focusing on girls and gaming. The stories aren't fulfilling. It was more a blog compilations of girls entries for there daily life, comic style. Very little substance Yet I did like some of the references. This book touches on all times of games- Console, PC, arcade, board, card, LARPing, Tabletop RPG, etc. I got mentions of SNES Mario, Street Fighter, The Sims, Diablo 2 (with a reference to the c 2 1/2 stars Overall, I was not impressed with this. It was a jumble of very short stories (3-6 pages) focusing on girls and gaming. The stories aren't fulfilling. It was more a blog compilations of girls entries for there daily life, comic style. Very little substance Yet I did like some of the references. This book touches on all times of games- Console, PC, arcade, board, card, LARPing, Tabletop RPG, etc. I got mentions of SNES Mario, Street Fighter, The Sims, Diablo 2 (with a reference to the cow level-that made me very happy), etc. So I did like all of that quite a bit. The artwork was not to my style. A lot of it seemed rush and left me unimpressed. Other times it seems too much was being crammed in and others not enough. Not a bad read, being how quick it is, but I was hoping for a bit better. *I was loaned a digital copy of this book in exchange for a fair, honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ben Mariner

    I'm definitely not the target audience for this book, but it sounded interesting so I read it anyway. It wasn't exactly what I was expecting. For the most part, it's just women sharing memories of how gaming made them feel accepted or themselves. I thought it would be a bit more narrative driven. I'm giving it this high of a rating not because I really enjoyed the stories (again, I'm not really the target audience), but because I thought it was really cool to see how something as simple as a vid I'm definitely not the target audience for this book, but it sounded interesting so I read it anyway. It wasn't exactly what I was expecting. For the most part, it's just women sharing memories of how gaming made them feel accepted or themselves. I thought it would be a bit more narrative driven. I'm giving it this high of a rating not because I really enjoyed the stories (again, I'm not really the target audience), but because I thought it was really cool to see how something as simple as a video game made someone feel ok with themselves. It's not easy to be a woman in...well, any day and age, really, but being a female gamer is a particularly tough path given the nature of most male gamers. These stories were sweet, and funny, and heartwarming, and while I didn't and can't quite connect on the same level with them as a female gamer could, it was still an enjoyable read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    A collection of women-penned short stories about gaming, whether it be video games, tabletop gaming or even LARPing. Several stories also deal with gender identity. As with any anthology some stories are great, while other are found lacking.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    This is amazing. Girl geeks talk about their experience with videogames and other nerdery and their influences on their childhoods. I was moved to tears by this multiple times.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ChrisVigilante

    I liked a lot of this but also not a fan of a lot of it. The comics are short so you get through the not so great ones quick but it still had a lasting effect. I also wasn't a fan of a lot of the art styles. Some were really hard to even get through. However, I loved the messages behind many of the comics in the anthology.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Hernandez

    It was fun, definitely relate, and good. I would definitely recommend to other women gamers and others, too! It's a mixture of women gamers from young to adult, variety of races and ethnicity, trans and cis folks, and so much more!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emma (howlsmovinglibrary)

    This was a great anthology! All the artwork is lovely and the comics range from autobiographical experience to mini-critique essays. There's lots and lots and lots of comics (although they are typical 2 double page spreads in length), so it's a substantial graphic novel to read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hollowspine

    What a great collection of comics about girls who game. So many stories that I could relate with, having been the sole girl at the gaming table for a long time myself. One of my favorites was about ‘GLaDOS’ from the Portal series of games. That comic alone was worth the library check out, I’d highly recommend it. I also loved the parental approval in the comic about the Sims computer game, it’s just like playing house, suitable for girls! I did the same thing with my Sims, I’ll never forget the What a great collection of comics about girls who game. So many stories that I could relate with, having been the sole girl at the gaming table for a long time myself. One of my favorites was about ‘GLaDOS’ from the Portal series of games. That comic alone was worth the library check out, I’d highly recommend it. I also loved the parental approval in the comic about the Sims computer game, it’s just like playing house, suitable for girls! I did the same thing with my Sims, I’ll never forget the first time I saw one of them get consumed by flies. Although most of the comics were related to table-top gaming/Larping there’s a good representation of video/computer gaming too. Most of the comics deal with a discovery of identity narrative, which is something that isn’t well recognized in gaming at all, let alone as something that is important for girls in particular. Gaming gives everyone the chance to try out different identities and start forming ideas of who we are and what our goals in life are, even if it’s just the realization that we are awesome at figuring out the logistics of equipping a wagon train. There, of course, is an overarching feminist tone to the anthology, which is highly refreshing. Another reason that this anthology really works is the diversity of the creators represented. Trans and non-binary voices are included as well as people from all walks of life, I would be seriously surprised if someone reading this couldn’t identify with at least one of the stories. I personally identified with many of them, some of them bringing up ideas and feelings that I’d never thought I’d see outside my own brain. For all gamers out there, this is highly recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maia

    This is a fabulous and delightful collection of outsider gamer stories, edited by Hazel Newlevant (who now works as an editor at Lion Forge Comics). The authors explore profound or irreverent connections with games from Dominion, Dungeons and Dragons, LARPing and play by posting to Mario, Pokemon, Zelda, Diablo II, Portal, World of Warcraft, Guitar Hero and the Sims. Some go to games for solitude, some for companionship; some relish in their status as female gamers, some explore a female identit This is a fabulous and delightful collection of outsider gamer stories, edited by Hazel Newlevant (who now works as an editor at Lion Forge Comics). The authors explore profound or irreverent connections with games from Dominion, Dungeons and Dragons, LARPing and play by posting to Mario, Pokemon, Zelda, Diablo II, Portal, World of Warcraft, Guitar Hero and the Sims. Some go to games for solitude, some for companionship; some relish in their status as female gamers, some explore a female identity denied to them IRL while still others chaff at the forced binary of choosing a male or female avatar. The book as a whole is extremely strong, but a few stories that particularly stuck out to me were "Poppy the Gnome and Friends" by Katie Longue, "Gamer Grrrl" by K.A. Kelly-Colon and June Vigants, "Battle for Amtgard..." by Maggie Siegel-Berele, "Absolute Dominion" by Diana Nock, "The Natural" by Sarah Stern and "Hang in there Peach" by Aatmaja Pandya.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    There's a bigger focus on tabletop gaming and LARPing than I expected, but that's a neat side of gaming to explore as well. Easily my favorite of the bunch was "She's the Backbone of this Facility" by Laura Lannes - I'd never examined the Portal games as closely as she does, and it's utterly fascinating and cool reading her analysis. The rest are hit and miss, though I'd say more hit than miss. Provides a much-needed perspective on a pastime that I love. ... not a huge fan of the cover though. :|

  16. 4 out of 5

    Derek Royal

    A top-notch collection of comics from a wide variety of creators. This anthology incorporates a whole world of styles, approaches to storytelling, and perspectives on gaming. What they all have in common, though, is that they're all created by female gamers who love both media: gaming and comics. But "gaming" here is handled broadly, not just video gaming. Another reason to love this book. I've recommended this to all my students, most of whom are in the ATEC program for some aspect of game stud A top-notch collection of comics from a wide variety of creators. This anthology incorporates a whole world of styles, approaches to storytelling, and perspectives on gaming. What they all have in common, though, is that they're all created by female gamers who love both media: gaming and comics. But "gaming" here is handled broadly, not just video gaming. Another reason to love this book. I've recommended this to all my students, most of whom are in the ATEC program for some aspect of game studies.

  17. 4 out of 5

    J.T.

    As a man with virtually no history of gaming (other than some arcade games and Atari 2600 as a kid), I am obviously not the target audience for this anthology. But, I always like learning about experiences different than my own. Many of the stories centered around using gaming as a resource to build confidence or escape loneliness. The best stories (in my opinion) dealt with how these games affected the artists rather than specifics of the games themselves.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    The whole gaming culture passed me by, but I can respect this anthology created by young women on what video, computer, and role-playing games mean to them. Many of these girls were outsiders amongst their peers as teenagers--something I can surely relate to--and found solace and community in the world of games.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    First adult graphic novel for me. This anthology helped me understand how younger women/girls are drawn into gaming and its positive impact.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kenya Starflight

    One of the benefits of anthologies done by multiple authors is that it gives you a taste of many different writers' styles. The downside is that, with any anthology, you're going to get a mixed bag -- some stories will be excellent, others okay or mediocre, and still others bad. "Chainmail Bikini," despite its noble intentions of showcasing women in gaming, is just such a mixed bag, with some stories faring much better than others... and while it's inspiring to see media that actually portrays g One of the benefits of anthologies done by multiple authors is that it gives you a taste of many different writers' styles. The downside is that, with any anthology, you're going to get a mixed bag -- some stories will be excellent, others okay or mediocre, and still others bad. "Chainmail Bikini," despite its noble intentions of showcasing women in gaming, is just such a mixed bag, with some stories faring much better than others... and while it's inspiring to see media that actually portrays gaming in a positive light, and shows how gaming has changed lives for the better, the art itself is lackluster, and some of the stories are just plain duds. Don't get me wrong -- I'm glad to see women in gaming, and we've come a long way from the days when gamers were seen as exclusively male and misogynistic (yes, there still exists some sexism and exclusion in gaming, but not nearly to the degree of before). And there are many stories in here that are touching, hopeful, gut-wrenching, or otherwise touched me. But there are also a fair share of stories that were merely okay or even confusing, and even the good ones were so short that they were over way too soon. I would have loved to see fewer contributors and longer stories -- perhaps this could have been a multi-volume series. The art itself is fairly underwhelming. Most of it looks pretty amateur, and even the more polished art seems rushed. The black-and-white-and-gray printing doesn't help, especially since some stories don't even bother with shading. I did appreciate seeing attention devoted to many different aspects of gaming -- not just the myriad forms of video games out there, but Dungeons and Dragons, LARPing, post-by-post roleplay, Magic: The Gathering, etc. And there are some truly powerful stories in this collection, and some much-needed attention given to the LGBT gaming community (yes, one exists). I just wish some of the stories could have been longer, and that the art had been better.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This book was everything I was looking for when I first heard about it. Stories varied in subject immensely-from video games to LARPing to board games to D&D. My favorite stories were the ones that reminded me of my own coming into gaming as a child/teenager. Games such as The Sims and Return to Castle Wolfenstein kept me glued to the PC all through the summer months. I looked at Game Informer magazine any chance I got while in a bookstore. I played Nintendo and Sega with my brother. Nowadays, m This book was everything I was looking for when I first heard about it. Stories varied in subject immensely-from video games to LARPing to board games to D&D. My favorite stories were the ones that reminded me of my own coming into gaming as a child/teenager. Games such as The Sims and Return to Castle Wolfenstein kept me glued to the PC all through the summer months. I looked at Game Informer magazine any chance I got while in a bookstore. I played Nintendo and Sega with my brother. Nowadays, my love of gaming has expanded to owning over 100 board games, a huge Steam library, and a growing collection of every Nintendo system ever made. Several of the stories of course deal with being a woman in the gaming community. I also (sadly) related to many of these stories as well. I actually don't play MMORPGs or other multi-player games because I don't want to deal with men once they figure out my gender (via microphone). I never go to board game nights because the men there refuse to even acknowledge me. I have often had doubtful looks cast my way when I mention anything about gaming to men. All in all though this book was filled with feel-good stories of many women connecting with other women over their niche gaming loves. Hopefully these relationships can soon blossom with the men in this community too so we can all geek out together.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Meepelous

    A really fast really fun read, it was actually a pretty painful reminder of some of the internalized misogyny that still lingers deep within my heart. Because F it, I'm as geeky and gamery as the next person >.< even if I don't see my games as REAL games. As far as the art goes, 99% of it was on point although if you aren't already comfortable with some rougher web comic and memoir comic styles you may find some of it a bit hard on the eyes. It also helps that childhood is a bit of a recurring th A really fast really fun read, it was actually a pretty painful reminder of some of the internalized misogyny that still lingers deep within my heart. Because F it, I'm as geeky and gamery as the next person >.< even if I don't see my games as REAL games. As far as the art goes, 99% of it was on point although if you aren't already comfortable with some rougher web comic and memoir comic styles you may find some of it a bit hard on the eyes. It also helps that childhood is a bit of a recurring theme, and a lot of the styles do reflect that vibe. The fact that everything was black and white also helped to draw things together, although I might have ordered things a bit differently if it was up to me. Each story in and of itself is pretty short, but there was a nice mixture of light and deep, personal and abstract. I do feel like this volume pushes us forward more than a little. I'm pretty excited about the even more different kinds of stories that are no doubt waiting for us just beyond the horizon ^^

  23. 4 out of 5

    RJ

    "Play is witchcraft. ...What else is magic other than the rituals we use to remind ourselves of our identities? The power to reclaim our lives?" - anna anthropy Gosh, this was really good. A lot of reviews complain of the focus on tabletop RPGs & LARPing (by my count, 16 of the 36 entries are about tabletop, LARPing or card games while the rest are about video games), but that really appealed to me! I have been looking for good writing about tabletop games and found a real dearth -- I would have "Play is witchcraft. ...What else is magic other than the rituals we use to remind ourselves of our identities? The power to reclaim our lives?" - anna anthropy Gosh, this was really good. A lot of reviews complain of the focus on tabletop RPGs & LARPing (by my count, 16 of the 36 entries are about tabletop, LARPing or card games while the rest are about video games), but that really appealed to me! I have been looking for good writing about tabletop games and found a real dearth -- I would have been pleased with just the sillier dungeon-crawl comics in here, but the more personal stories about Monsterhearts and Vampire: The Masquerade were real highlights of the anthology for me. Also, I usually don't take note or comment on the design of a book, but big ups to Hellen Jo (cover artist) and Jasmine Silver (layout), this is a beautiful object. I ordered it for my library but I'm thinking about getting my own copy because it's just nice to look at and hold!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vin MacLean

    I love anything that has to do with 1) the way we interact with virtual realities and 2) women and so I thought that this would be a win no matter how it played it out. While many of these didn't personally connect with me due to my inexperience in the world of DND and LARPing the general thesis was beautiful and heartfelt. A universal experience of womanhood is feeling trapped or contained to a vessel that is expected to perform and conform socially. Video games and fantasy role play give a cha I love anything that has to do with 1) the way we interact with virtual realities and 2) women and so I thought that this would be a win no matter how it played it out. While many of these didn't personally connect with me due to my inexperience in the world of DND and LARPing the general thesis was beautiful and heartfelt. A universal experience of womanhood is feeling trapped or contained to a vessel that is expected to perform and conform socially. Video games and fantasy role play give a chance for you to choose and practice autonomy away from those expectations/create a persona around them. There's a special relationship that women and queer people have with interactive media that personally touches me and I really enjoyed the general existence of this anthology. The standout piece in this for me was the comic about GLaDOS from Portal as a commentary on womanhood. It alone was five star piece and I would highly recommended it as a nuanced and outstanding feminist essay. 3 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    It's so hard to judge these anthologies, with collections of different stories and artists. I usually like some of the stories, and others I think are just OK. But, as a whole I really liked what this collection was aiming for. It established an overall narrative that girl gamers are out there, and have just as valid a love for gaming as their male counterparts. It also showed that all gamers need an inclusive gaming environment for everyone, man, woman and in-between, because gaming can be a ve It's so hard to judge these anthologies, with collections of different stories and artists. I usually like some of the stories, and others I think are just OK. But, as a whole I really liked what this collection was aiming for. It established an overall narrative that girl gamers are out there, and have just as valid a love for gaming as their male counterparts. It also showed that all gamers need an inclusive gaming environment for everyone, man, woman and in-between, because gaming can be a very important aspect of a person's life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Reeter

    This was a great collection of stories, some of which I related to way more than I thought I would. Especially, with the "Reticulating Spines" story. I remember having that exact same crisis. My main gripe is that the stories are far too short, and some seem to just end. Maybe it's because there are so many contributors, and they wanted to fits as many as they could in, but I feel like some stories would've been even better had they been allowed to develop more. Other than that, I really enjoyed This was a great collection of stories, some of which I related to way more than I thought I would. Especially, with the "Reticulating Spines" story. I remember having that exact same crisis. My main gripe is that the stories are far too short, and some seem to just end. Maybe it's because there are so many contributors, and they wanted to fits as many as they could in, but I feel like some stories would've been even better had they been allowed to develop more. Other than that, I really enjoyed this, and would love to see more stories and comics by and about women gamers.

  27. 5 out of 5

    B

    Very short memoir-ish illustrated stories. They generally broke down into three themes: 1. I like games/good gaming memory. 2. I like games, but men have tried to push me out of my own space. 3. I like games and men have tried to push me out of my own space and I have taken action about it. There's no organization that I can see and so you get a lot of repetition and inconsistency. There are definitely some winners here, but I did not enjoy reading the whole collection. To be honest, it may have bee Very short memoir-ish illustrated stories. They generally broke down into three themes: 1. I like games/good gaming memory. 2. I like games, but men have tried to push me out of my own space. 3. I like games and men have tried to push me out of my own space and I have taken action about it. There's no organization that I can see and so you get a lot of repetition and inconsistency. There are definitely some winners here, but I did not enjoy reading the whole collection. To be honest, it may have been my fault because I was expecting prose and some more depth.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    I adored this anthology. I've been quietly playing video games since my 90s childhood, when Pokemon Blue became the first cartridge to truly capture my heart. Besides the occasional fighting game shared with friends, however, playing games was something I largely did, and still do, alone. Gaming culture at large has diversified over the years, but still remains often hostile and alienating. There was something profoundly moving about reading an anthology penned by other women and femmes, many qu I adored this anthology. I've been quietly playing video games since my 90s childhood, when Pokemon Blue became the first cartridge to truly capture my heart. Besides the occasional fighting game shared with friends, however, playing games was something I largely did, and still do, alone. Gaming culture at large has diversified over the years, but still remains often hostile and alienating. There was something profoundly moving about reading an anthology penned by other women and femmes, many queer and trans, and finding that their experiences were shared with my own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    As a gamer girl myself, I was super excited to read this anthology, but unfortunately I found most of the comics to be too brief and was ultimately underwhelmed. Some of the stronger stories for me focused on the issues of sexism in various gaming communities, calling out problems and noting recent improvements where they exist. A lot of the lighter stories suffer from the old adage that it’s never really that fun to listen to someone else recount in detail the exploits of their D&D campaign :b As a gamer girl myself, I was super excited to read this anthology, but unfortunately I found most of the comics to be too brief and was ultimately underwhelmed. Some of the stronger stories for me focused on the issues of sexism in various gaming communities, calling out problems and noting recent improvements where they exist. A lot of the lighter stories suffer from the old adage that it’s never really that fun to listen to someone else recount in detail the exploits of their D&D campaign :b

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    I had ordered this a while back,but it had got lost on a TBR pile. This weekend a podcast I listened to involving Hazel Newlevant discussed this book and a couple others. After listening, I definitely needed to read this anthology. Well...it’s fantastic! Games referenced I knew made me laugh and games I didn’t know made me interested. All the entries were enjoyable. Definitely one of the best anthologies I own.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.