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An extended new Preface and a new Epilogue written after the fall of the Taliban in 2001, place The Kirghiz and Wakhi of Afghanistan, originally published in 1979, in the context of a vastly changed world. The original book describes the cultural and ecological adaptation of the nomadic Kirghiz and their agriculturalist neighbors, the Wakhi, to high altitudes and a frigid An extended new Preface and a new Epilogue written after the fall of the Taliban in 2001, place The Kirghiz and Wakhi of Afghanistan, originally published in 1979, in the context of a vastly changed world. The original book describes the cultural and ecological adaptation of the nomadic Kirghiz and their agriculturalist neighbors, the Wakhi, to high altitudes and a frigid climate in the Wakhan Corridor, a panhandle of Afghanistan that borders Pakistan, the former Soviet Union, and the People's Republic of China. The new Preface challenges the assumption that the root cause of terrorism is religious. Shahrani asserts that the problem of terrorism is fundamentally political and is historically linked to the inappropriate model of the centralized nation-state introduced to Afghanistan by colonial regimes. The differing responses of the Kirghiz and Wakhi to the Marxist coup are discussed in the new Epilogue. Shahrani has closely followed the flight of the Kirghiz to Pakistan in 1978 and their eventual resettlement among resentful Kurdish villagers in eastern Turkey in 1982. The ethnographic documentation and analysis of the transformation of Kirghiz society, politics, economics, and demography since their exodus from the Pamirs offers valuable lessons to our understanding of the dynamics and true resilience of small pastoral nomadic communities.


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An extended new Preface and a new Epilogue written after the fall of the Taliban in 2001, place The Kirghiz and Wakhi of Afghanistan, originally published in 1979, in the context of a vastly changed world. The original book describes the cultural and ecological adaptation of the nomadic Kirghiz and their agriculturalist neighbors, the Wakhi, to high altitudes and a frigid An extended new Preface and a new Epilogue written after the fall of the Taliban in 2001, place The Kirghiz and Wakhi of Afghanistan, originally published in 1979, in the context of a vastly changed world. The original book describes the cultural and ecological adaptation of the nomadic Kirghiz and their agriculturalist neighbors, the Wakhi, to high altitudes and a frigid climate in the Wakhan Corridor, a panhandle of Afghanistan that borders Pakistan, the former Soviet Union, and the People's Republic of China. The new Preface challenges the assumption that the root cause of terrorism is religious. Shahrani asserts that the problem of terrorism is fundamentally political and is historically linked to the inappropriate model of the centralized nation-state introduced to Afghanistan by colonial regimes. The differing responses of the Kirghiz and Wakhi to the Marxist coup are discussed in the new Epilogue. Shahrani has closely followed the flight of the Kirghiz to Pakistan in 1978 and their eventual resettlement among resentful Kurdish villagers in eastern Turkey in 1982. The ethnographic documentation and analysis of the transformation of Kirghiz society, politics, economics, and demography since their exodus from the Pamirs offers valuable lessons to our understanding of the dynamics and true resilience of small pastoral nomadic communities.

30 review for The Kirghiz and Wakhi of Afghanistan: Adaptation to Closed Frontiers and War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Dr. Nazir Shahrai, a professor at University of Washington, is one of the world's foremost experts on the Kirghiz nomadic people of the Wakhan corrdidor in NE Afghanistan. In this book he compiles his decades long anthropological research research of the nomadic Kirghiz pasturalists and sedentary Wakhi peasants, and how their lives were changed by the entry of outside Tajik mujahadeen (freedom fighters) in the late 1970 and 1980's. Excellent book for anyone insterested in this remote area of the Dr. Nazir Shahrai, a professor at University of Washington, is one of the world's foremost experts on the Kirghiz nomadic people of the Wakhan corrdidor in NE Afghanistan. In this book he compiles his decades long anthropological research research of the nomadic Kirghiz pasturalists and sedentary Wakhi peasants, and how their lives were changed by the entry of outside Tajik mujahadeen (freedom fighters) in the late 1970 and 1980's. Excellent book for anyone insterested in this remote area of the world.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jarrod Brett

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carlo Cristofori

  4. 4 out of 5

    Diana

  5. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Schinder

  6. 5 out of 5

    Delbert Leschwab

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brittney

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mariben Estrada

  10. 4 out of 5

    KellyWells

  11. 5 out of 5

    Larra

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

  13. 4 out of 5

    Wikimedia Italia

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jensen

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bobbie

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ghulam Mohammad

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Eliade

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nadir Barlas

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jason Wolfe

  20. 5 out of 5

    Logan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kavya

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Kanouse McKay

  24. 5 out of 5

    Zeeshan

  25. 5 out of 5

    DaNi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Samira

  27. 4 out of 5

    Abdullah Karaer

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cherishka

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kris Kaleta

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