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The Gettysburg Campaign: The History and Legacy of the Civil War’s Most Famous Campaign

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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting by soldiers and generals on both sides *Discusses the controversies surrounding the campaign, such as Stuart's ride before the battle and who's to blame for the Confederate loss *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “The failure to crush the Federal army in Penn *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting by soldiers and generals on both sides *Discusses the controversies surrounding the campaign, such as Stuart's ride before the battle and who's to blame for the Confederate loss *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “The failure to crush the Federal army in Pennsylvania in 1863, in the opinion of almost all of the officers of the Army of Northern Virginia, can be expressed in five words—the absence of the cavalry.” – Confederate General Henry Heth “I've always thought the Yankees had something to do with it.” - George Pickett Without question, the most famous battle of the American Civil War took place outside of the small town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, which happened to be a transportation hub, serving as the center of a wheel with several roads leading out to other Pennsylvanian towns. From July 1-3, Robert E. Lee’s Confederate Army of Northern Virginia tried everything in its power to decisively defeat George Meade’s Union Army of the Potomac, unleashing ferocious assaults that inflicted nearly 50,000 casualties in all. Day 1 of the battle would have been one of the 25 biggest battles of the Civil War itself, and it ended with a tactical Confederate victory. But over the next two days, Lee would try and fail to dislodge the Union army with attacks on both of its flanks during the second day and Pickett’s Charge on the third and final day. Meade’s stout defense held, barely, repulsing each attempted assault, handing the Union a desperately needed victory that ended up being one of the Civil War’s turning points. After the South had lost the war, the importance of Gettysburg as one of the “high tide” marks of the Confederacy became apparent to everyone, making the battle all the more important in the years after it had been fought. While former Confederate generals cast about for scapegoats, with various officers pointing fingers at Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, and James Stuart, historians and avid Civil War fans became obsessed with studying and analyzing all the command decisions and army movements during the entire campaign. Despite the saturation of coverage, Americans refuse to grow tired of visiting the battlefield and reliving the biggest battle fought in North America. The Gettysburg Campaign: The History and Legacy of the Civil War’s Most Famous Campaign analyzes the entire campaign and its major battles, from Brandy Station to the retreat of Lee’s army after Pickett’s Charge. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Gettysburg campaign like never before, in no time at all.


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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting by soldiers and generals on both sides *Discusses the controversies surrounding the campaign, such as Stuart's ride before the battle and who's to blame for the Confederate loss *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “The failure to crush the Federal army in Penn *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting by soldiers and generals on both sides *Discusses the controversies surrounding the campaign, such as Stuart's ride before the battle and who's to blame for the Confederate loss *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “The failure to crush the Federal army in Pennsylvania in 1863, in the opinion of almost all of the officers of the Army of Northern Virginia, can be expressed in five words—the absence of the cavalry.” – Confederate General Henry Heth “I've always thought the Yankees had something to do with it.” - George Pickett Without question, the most famous battle of the American Civil War took place outside of the small town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, which happened to be a transportation hub, serving as the center of a wheel with several roads leading out to other Pennsylvanian towns. From July 1-3, Robert E. Lee’s Confederate Army of Northern Virginia tried everything in its power to decisively defeat George Meade’s Union Army of the Potomac, unleashing ferocious assaults that inflicted nearly 50,000 casualties in all. Day 1 of the battle would have been one of the 25 biggest battles of the Civil War itself, and it ended with a tactical Confederate victory. But over the next two days, Lee would try and fail to dislodge the Union army with attacks on both of its flanks during the second day and Pickett’s Charge on the third and final day. Meade’s stout defense held, barely, repulsing each attempted assault, handing the Union a desperately needed victory that ended up being one of the Civil War’s turning points. After the South had lost the war, the importance of Gettysburg as one of the “high tide” marks of the Confederacy became apparent to everyone, making the battle all the more important in the years after it had been fought. While former Confederate generals cast about for scapegoats, with various officers pointing fingers at Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, and James Stuart, historians and avid Civil War fans became obsessed with studying and analyzing all the command decisions and army movements during the entire campaign. Despite the saturation of coverage, Americans refuse to grow tired of visiting the battlefield and reliving the biggest battle fought in North America. The Gettysburg Campaign: The History and Legacy of the Civil War’s Most Famous Campaign analyzes the entire campaign and its major battles, from Brandy Station to the retreat of Lee’s army after Pickett’s Charge. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Gettysburg campaign like never before, in no time at all.

30 review for The Gettysburg Campaign: The History and Legacy of the Civil War’s Most Famous Campaign

  1. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    Seeing the pictures of the Generals and learning their stories was very interesting to me. I enjoyed hearing about the ridiculousness of parading around before a battle when the enemy can see you. Putting this battle into perspective for me allowing me to visualize the battle of all battles. It was great. So many events led to the battle that day and it's outcome. So many unexpected events. If you love history, this is a wonderful way to learn about the most famous battle of the civil war.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah - All The Book Blog Names Are Taken

    Not without some editing issues (whole paragraphs sometimes repeated word for word), but a decent introduction. I've been trying for some time to learn more about the Civil War and to be interested in the war itself instead of only the social and cultural aspects. Full review to come. +++++++++++++ http://allthebookblognamesaretaken.bl... www.facebook.com/AllTheBookBlogNamesA... www.twitter.com/SarahsBookNook I have been trying for some time to find an interest in the Civil War. It is easily one of t Not without some editing issues (whole paragraphs sometimes repeated word for word), but a decent introduction. I've been trying for some time to learn more about the Civil War and to be interested in the war itself instead of only the social and cultural aspects. Full review to come. +++++++++++++ http://allthebookblognamesaretaken.bl... www.facebook.com/AllTheBookBlogNamesA... www.twitter.com/SarahsBookNook I have been trying for some time to find an interest in the Civil War. It is easily one of the most important series of events in the history of the United States, yet it is something I have never really been interested in. I'm not sure why, because when I was younger I loved learning about the 1800s and I wanted to be a pioneer (I know right?!). But I definitely do not enjoy reading about military history, war, weapons, battle plans, etc. I am interested in the social and cultural aspects of the war, and was looking at this one to supplement that and start small, by looking at one battle. And naturally, I had to choose the most famous battle of them all. Overall this was a decent introduction to a very dense and complex topic. I really enjoyed the fact that there were so many photographs included, especially of the many generals and other military men when they were discussed. I find this especially helpful in non-fiction texts, particularly when there are a lot of players involved and it is a new topic to me. There were also multiple instances of primary sources included, which I can always appreciate. The editors included many, many parts of whole letters from various generals to their wives, to fellow generals, or their superiors. It is always interesting to have insight into historical figures in this way, to get the words directly from their mouths or pens. The book is, however, not without issues. These seem to be editing issues for the most part. Especially early on, I was finding whole paragraphs, or at least sections of paragraphs, repeated within pages of one another. This was incredibly distracting, especially on a Kindle. I would read a section and then suddenly be reading it a few paragraphs later, and I would think I had somehow gone backwards. This is something that must be taken care of in order for the book to be taken seriously, as it reflects poorly on the scholarship and the text itself. I found this quote wryly amusing: "Perhaps none other than George Pickett himself put it best. When asked (certainly ad nauseam) why Pickett's charge had failed, Pickett is said to have tersely replied, "I've always thought the Yankees had something to do with it."" I can recommend this with some hesitation due to the above-mentioned editing. Luckily the issues do not occur throughout the entire book, otherwise this would be one I would not have finished.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Edwin Lowe

    An Excellent Concise Civil War History!!! Book Review Written September 15, 2019 The Gettysburg Campaign: The History and Legacy of the Civil War’s Most Famous Campaign, By Charles River Editors Kindle Edition (124 Pages) This is a concise history of General Robert E. Lee's Gettysburg Campaign (June 9 - July14, 1863) and the Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3 July, 1863. The narrative analyzes the entire campaign, its major battles, (Brandy Station and Gettysburg), and the retreat of the Confederate Army An Excellent Concise Civil War History!!! Book Review Written September 15, 2019 The Gettysburg Campaign: The History and Legacy of the Civil War’s Most Famous Campaign, By Charles River Editors Kindle Edition (124 Pages) This is a concise history of General Robert E. Lee's Gettysburg Campaign (June 9 - July14, 1863) and the Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3 July, 1863. The narrative analyzes the entire campaign, its major battles, (Brandy Station and Gettysburg), and the retreat of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. It details the movements the Confederate Army as it invaded the north from Virginia on course towards its fateful meeting with the Union Army of the Potomac Gettysburg, PA, encompassing the period June 9 to July 1, 1863. It discusses the fighting that occurred at Brandy Station, VA, (June 9) and the impact of its outcome on subsequent campaign operations conducted June 25 - July 2, by the Confederate cavalry, Commanded by General J.E.B. Stuart. The narrative outlines this operation, historically dubbed "Stuart's Ride"as well as discussing the controversy surrounding the impact this operation had on the Gettysburg battle's conduct and outcome. It also provides an excellent Gettysburg battle overview, with an insightful, day by day, analysis of the key events that occurred during the fighting that impacted the final outcome. It provides an excellent chronicle of Picket's Charge, the disastrous Confederate assault, which was repulsed by Meade's army and resulted in a Union victory at Gettysburg. Finally, it details Confederate retreat back to Virginia and addresses the concerns President Lincoln had regarding the success of that retreat. The narrative is liberally augmented by participant's written battle accounts. It also, analyzes the battlefield tactics and decisions made by the most important leaders, explains there impacts, and provides insights regarding the important impacts Gettysburg had on future operations of the Civil War. The narrative is supplemented by maps of major movements made by the armies during the campaign, numerous Gettysburg battle maps, numerous images of important leaders, places, and events, and includes an excellent bibliography for those people seeking additional information. If you are interested in history but shy away from the voluminous, scholarly (dry or pretentious), and frequently painful to read and comprehend, type history books there is an alternative. I suggest that you look for history books published by Charles River Editors.This excellent book was professionally researched from numerous primary and secondary sources, written, and published by Charles River Editors. This digital publishing house produces hundreds of thoroughly researched, concise, informative, and well written historical texts.This collection is focused on chronicling world history, including the lives and contributions of historically significant persons, the course of important events, and the actions of great nations and peoples. I have read a good number of their offerings and found each volume well written, researched, informative and presented in an unbiased, easy to understand manner. Without question, the most famous battle of the American Civil War took place outside of the small town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, which happened to be a transportation hub, serving as the center of a wheel with several roads leading out to other Pennsylvanian towns. From July 1-3, Robert E. Lee’s Confederate Army of Northern Virginia tried everything in its power to decisively defeat George Meade’s Union Army of the Potomac, unleashing ferocious assaults that inflicted nearly 50,000 casualties in all. Day 1 of the battle would have been one of the 25 biggest battles of the Civil War itself, and it ended with a tactical Confederate victory. But over the next two days, Lee would try and fail to dislodge the Union army with attacks on both of its flanks during the second day and Pickett’s Charge on the third and final day. Meade’s stout defense held, barely, repulsing each attempted assault, handing the Union a desperately needed victory that ended up being one of the Civil War’s turning points. This book delivers an interesting, straight forward account of the entire campaign and the famous battle that was enjoyable to read and easy to comprehend. It is well researched and carefully documented for accuracy. The narrative is engaging and augmented throughout by participants accounts that were informative, authentic, and added a sense of reality to the account. I particularly enjoyed the battlefield accounts because they brought home the reality of combat during the Civil War. This book provides a balanced, factual narrative of the strategies and tactics of the belligerent forces, rendered more relevant and tangible through the inclusion of social, cultural, political, and economic discussions in the narrative, while, carefully attending to the military aspects of the battle of the entire Gettysburg confrontation and it's relationship to the overall conduct of the Civil War. Readers that enjoy American history, US Civil War history, and studies of 19th Century warfare strategies, tactics, and combat will enjoy this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Doug

    In as far as historical novels go this was just so-so. I am somewhat of a Civil War buff and found this book on BookBub and placed it in my library. Recently I chose this book to read during this ConV crisis as a way to pass the time. I would have to agree with another reviewer on this book, "Not without some editing issues (whole paragraphs sometimes repeated word for word), but a decent introduction". I concur that in spite of the editing issues this was a pretty decent and accurate introducti In as far as historical novels go this was just so-so. I am somewhat of a Civil War buff and found this book on BookBub and placed it in my library. Recently I chose this book to read during this ConV crisis as a way to pass the time. I would have to agree with another reviewer on this book, "Not without some editing issues (whole paragraphs sometimes repeated word for word), but a decent introduction". I concur that in spite of the editing issues this was a pretty decent and accurate introduction to the Gettysburg Campaign. I would caution other readers that are looking for a more in-depth study to look for another source. To the Charles River Editors credit, this was a decent superficial/broad look at the Gettysburg Campaign.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Patti Fischetti

    It was easy to read As history books go, some are hard to get through but this was easy to read and sometimes humorous. It was written as a personal account and made the battles come alive. Some times the account got a little jumbled up so I got lost. An interesting battle to be sure for Civil War buffs.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brian Smith

    Gettysburg This book could have been a little more detailed but as a whole this was a good campaign walk through.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Informative but dry Very informative, but dry. Lots of long quotations that made it difficult to keep events straight and tell which side each player was on

  8. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    "The Gettysburg Campaign: The History and Legacy of the Civil War's Most Famous Campaign" is a pretty good introduction to the events that marked the high tide of the Confederacy. Technically, the portraits were clear on my Kindle, although the landscape pictures were not. I would expect the pictures to be clearer if I were reading on a tablet. There are some significant editing issues; for example, some sentences and even paragraphs are reprinted verbatim in multiple locations. It reminds me a "The Gettysburg Campaign: The History and Legacy of the Civil War's Most Famous Campaign" is a pretty good introduction to the events that marked the high tide of the Confederacy. Technically, the portraits were clear on my Kindle, although the landscape pictures were not. I would expect the pictures to be clearer if I were reading on a tablet. There are some significant editing issues; for example, some sentences and even paragraphs are reprinted verbatim in multiple locations. It reminds me a bit of a term paper, written with a lot of good research and some insight that needed really good proof-reading before it is ready to be submitted. The author has drawn on some of the best resources to describe the activities leading up to the battle itself with focus on how these contributed to decisions made by the generals and to the ultimate outcome of the action. Eye-witness accounts are liberally used although the narrative never falls back on sentimentality. The author is even-handed in his assessment of responsibility for the final results, and does not romanticize what occurs. The narrative is just that, narrative with some insights and a limited analysis. A good introduction for someone who wants to have a broad overview of the Gettysburg campaign.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Gregory

    Precision research and writing The Charles River Publishers have produced yet another concise historical events. This is one of the greatest, perhaps the greatest in American history and this writing covers it well. It brings the tension and angst experienced by all those leaders, the unfortunate decision by Lee, the decision that brought down the Confederacy. He wrestled with the fact that he held the territory and asked the question: How can we retreat when we've won the field? As typified by P Precision research and writing The Charles River Publishers have produced yet another concise historical events. This is one of the greatest, perhaps the greatest in American history and this writing covers it well. It brings the tension and angst experienced by all those leaders, the unfortunate decision by Lee, the decision that brought down the Confederacy. He wrestled with the fact that he held the territory and asked the question: How can we retreat when we've won the field? As typified by Pickett's Charge, most of the battle was a hellish blood bath for the South. I really enjoy these photographs. It is so interesting to see the clothes and facial hair styles, but even more revealing to witness the at-the-moment, steely determination of these heroic men on both sides. As a 34 year educator and a 26 year history teacher, I can recommend this book for high school and college U.S. History classes.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    I thought this book was an interesting study of what led to Gettysburg as well as the battle itself. The pictures and quotes from the various generals involved gave more life to them than I have seen in some other books on the same subject. However there were some editing issues which made it difficult to read at times, and I had some trouble trying to visualize what was going on. I think it would have benefited from some diagrams of troop movements during the battles to make it easier to underst I thought this book was an interesting study of what led to Gettysburg as well as the battle itself. The pictures and quotes from the various generals involved gave more life to them than I have seen in some other books on the same subject. However there were some editing issues which made it difficult to read at times, and I had some trouble trying to visualize what was going on. I think it would have benefited from some diagrams of troop movements during the battles to make it easier to understand.

  11. 5 out of 5

    David

    Southern mistakes Enjoyed reading of the planning and eventual events of those 3 days in July which helped the Union to remain in tact. Would have liked to have seen some maps and diagrams to help visualize the troop movements. Highly recommend to anyone interested in Civil War history.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Beverly McCall

    Charles River presents another historical account of three days of the battle of Gettysburg. I liked the way the author analyze this campaign. In particularly I enjoyed reading the actual words those who were there. This added to understanding the mindset of those in command and involved in this battle.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jim Manis

    How the South Lost at Gettesburg Mostly about Southern general staff failures, but in final analysis, Mead and the federals simply outfought them. The battle symbolizes as much as anything the lost cause of the Confederacy.

  14. 5 out of 5

    CARLOS V. LABRADA

    Battle of Gettysburg Good account of one of the Civil War greatest and decisive battle. The battle is easily explained how it unfolded and came to a conclusion. Great to read the words written by some of the Civil Wars greatest generals.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rick Colburn

    Excellent Read If you love the history of the Civil war especially of individual battles then you will enjoy this book it's not real long but it is packed with history of the Gettysburg battle I picked it up and read it cover to cover in one setting

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    I really found this a bit ho hum. Maybe I've read too much Civil War history to be objective. We ran here, got shot at, and shot back. Ran somewhere else, got shot at, shot back. And so on. Maps of army locations and movements would make a huge positive difference.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Ferguson

    Short Thorough History An enjoyable and thorough analysis and history of the battle that turned the tide of the CivilWar, complete with period photos.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Renee Howe

    Easy to read. picks up easy to do light reading.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Datta

    A comprehensive introduction to this vital part of the War Between the States

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katie Murphy

    Gettysburg Excellent book, also horribly, horribly sad. I can see why the war is still so fresh in the hearts and minds of the families that fought in it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nayda Jiménez-Pérez

  23. 4 out of 5

    K Joseph

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kris

  25. 5 out of 5

    RONALD K FUCHS

  26. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  27. 5 out of 5

    Leslie B Mink

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Shower

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robert Pearson

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jodi Fayle

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