counter create hit Education Of A Public Man: My Life and Politics - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Education Of A Public Man: My Life and Politics

Availability: Ready to download

A reprint of the Doubleday edition of 1976 with a new afterword by Norman Sherman. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.


Compare

A reprint of the Doubleday edition of 1976 with a new afterword by Norman Sherman. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.

30 review for Education Of A Public Man: My Life and Politics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim Gallen

    I have read many autobiographies and this is one of the best ones. It is Hubert Humphrey’s memoirs of his life from his early days in South Dakota through his childhood, education, marriage and political career as mayor of Minneapolis, Senator, Vice-President, Presidential nominee and Senator again to publication in 1976. As he died in January 1978 there is little beyond the scope of this work. Readers are introduced to his family, although little is said about his children other than their name I have read many autobiographies and this is one of the best ones. It is Hubert Humphrey’s memoirs of his life from his early days in South Dakota through his childhood, education, marriage and political career as mayor of Minneapolis, Senator, Vice-President, Presidential nominee and Senator again to publication in 1976. As he died in January 1978 there is little beyond the scope of this work. Readers are introduced to his family, although little is said about his children other than their names, his involvement in small business with Humphrey’s Drug Store and his public challenges both political and in governance. I am impressed by the author’s apparent candor in analyzing figures with whom he shared the public stage. His accounts of struggles with Marxists when merging the Democratic and Farm Labor Parties of Minnesota present insights into the prevalence of Communists in American public life during the 1940s. He proclaims his advice against escalation of the war in Vietnam that he loyally supported, although admits that in some circumstances he, based on the information available at the time, was supportive of actions taken in resistance to Communism. He shares his anguish over the death of President Kennedy and his surprise when Johnson announced that he would not run for reelection. He complains about Democrats who were lukewarm in their support of him in 1968 and asserts that, with enthusiastic support, he could have won. When he returned to the Senate, he was disappointed not to be restored to his former influence and his inability to use his broad experience. Although always civil, he praises and criticizes as he sees fit. He reports affection of Adlai Stevenson, his relationship with Eugene McCarthy and his rivalry with the Kennedys. While critical of Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew, he does volunteer that the language revealed by the Nixon tapes was comparable to that used by Presidents Truman, Kennedy and Johnson. I was surprised by his evaluation of Lyndon Johnson. Johnson comes across as a searcher for peace who gained a reputation as a warmonger while he thought that he was restraining the military. He believes that Johnson deserves great credit for his domestic accomplishments but describes his flips from lavish praise to meanness when frustrated or annoyed. He posits that there was no plan for Vietnam but a series of ad hoc responses to events. Believing that LBJ’s reputation as a “political operator” was based on his success in Congress, he adds “when it came to party politics, he was not good.” His failure to build the party structure would create problems for Johnson as his popularity waned and for Humphrey when he tried to succeed him. Humphrey reflects on the vice-presidency as he experienced it. He tells us “I liked being Vice-President. There is a special kind of excitement, tension, and drama in being so close to executive power.” He does write of his frustrations with limitations placed by President Johnson and the nature of the office and his plans to expand the role of a Vice President Muskie. He places his term in the continuum of Nixon, Johnson, Humphrey, Agnew, Ford and Rockefeller. Humphrey draws lessons from his observations. His is a liberal to the last. He lauds Democratic domestic programs and regrets that they were deemphasized by subsequent administrations. In his text, Humphrey portrays the Vietnam War as a civil war in which corruption and mismanagement doomed the American effort. After asking “Will there be no more Vietnams?” he lists his eight lessons from that conflict. Through his lessons are points about the limitation of American power. Richard Nixon wrote a book, “No More Vietnams”. Their views of the nature of the war differ as do their lessons. Nixon concludes “In Vietnam, we tried and failed in a just cause. No more Vietnams’ can mean that we will not try again. It should mean that we will not fail again.” I was too young to vote in 1968 but I proudly wore my Nixon button and am still proud that I did, but I am also glad that I read “The Education Of A Public Man”.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Fascinating autobiography of a Minnesota legend. I knew a lot of the major points: the speech in 1948 at the democratic national convention, where HHH's support for civil rights began driving the racists out of the party; the merging of the Democrats and the Farmer-Labor parties that still exists today as the DFL; the rise in the senate eventually becoming LBJ's VP; the race in 1968 where a country tearing itself apart over Vietnam and civil rights handed us Nixon. But there's a ton here I didn' Fascinating autobiography of a Minnesota legend. I knew a lot of the major points: the speech in 1948 at the democratic national convention, where HHH's support for civil rights began driving the racists out of the party; the merging of the Democrats and the Farmer-Labor parties that still exists today as the DFL; the rise in the senate eventually becoming LBJ's VP; the race in 1968 where a country tearing itself apart over Vietnam and civil rights handed us Nixon. But there's a ton here I didn't really know about. I missed his other runs for president, not realizing he was a serious contender in 1960 or again in 1972. I didn't know much about his early life and how far he came in overcoming poverty and the varied career opportunities before him until he finally made politics his life as Mayor of Minneapolis. It's really interesting stuff. It's a pretty honest and fair look from his perspective at his life and the politics, too. HHH isn't afraid to admit areas where he was wrong, and he stands up strongly on things other people thought he was wrong about and he still thinks he was right. He states it pretty clearly what he thinks and lets you judge the truth of it. One thing that shines through the entire book is his deep and abiding love of the United States, passion for public service, and enduring positive belief in the best of people and what we may accomplish. There's a lot of lessons and comments that are remarkably applicable to what we face as a country today, and it's rather fascinating to read. His lessons on Vietnam are applicable to the "War on Terror" and it makes you wonder if we will ever learn. Excellent book on a great and often forgotten man.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Fairly well written and self-indulgent as you would expect from a politician talking about himself. Ultimately, one learns a lot about not only Humphrey, but the deeper workings within the United States political spectrum. We often hear nowadays the publics perception and viewpoint of what happened during those tumultuous sixties, to now hear it from the point of view and mind of a high ranking government official puts into perspective the two sides, and how they really weren't all the far apart Fairly well written and self-indulgent as you would expect from a politician talking about himself. Ultimately, one learns a lot about not only Humphrey, but the deeper workings within the United States political spectrum. We often hear nowadays the publics perception and viewpoint of what happened during those tumultuous sixties, to now hear it from the point of view and mind of a high ranking government official puts into perspective the two sides, and how they really weren't all the far apart. Humphrey conveyed himself as a man with little resolve, paired with an overwhelmingly positively optimistic attitude, which is just as valuable in a politician. His dedicated to his work is unmatched. If the establishments had more of him, one may be brave enough to believe in the system more. Like his speeches, the book drags in a couple spots. His commentary is by no means colourful, but it is insightful.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andy Miller

    The bulk of this autobiography by Hubert Humphrey was written shortly after he lost the 1968 presidential election with an ending chapter that briefly covered his life from then until 1975. Humphrey was at his best writing this book when recounting his childhood, young life and years in the Senate. His heartfelt memories of his family, his childhood home and how his family was forced to sell it during the Depression, and the sacrifices made for his on again off again college career show the shapi The bulk of this autobiography by Hubert Humphrey was written shortly after he lost the 1968 presidential election with an ending chapter that briefly covered his life from then until 1975. Humphrey was at his best writing this book when recounting his childhood, young life and years in the Senate. His heartfelt memories of his family, his childhood home and how his family was forced to sell it during the Depression, and the sacrifices made for his on again off again college career show the shaping of his values along with his natural optimism. I especially enjoyed the stories of his father, a Democrat in small Midwestern towns where his progressive beliefs were typically in the minority but carried respect from those who disagreed with him--all the while struggling to support his family. I also enjoyed his recounting of his early years in the Senate where he began as an outcast, largely from his leadership of the adoption of the strong civil rights plank in the 1948 Democratic convention, to his increasing influence that resulted from his love of the Senate as an institution and his genuine affection and respect for fellow senators even when he was on opposing sides. I especially enjoyed the telling of the passage of the first civil rights act, one of my favorite parts was his accomodation of the health issues of Willis Robertson, the elderly senator from Virginia, during the fillibuster, and the poignant payback by Robertson who answered quorum calls for Humphrey when there were not enough pro civil rights senators on the floor Humphrey was less effective when writing about his experience as Vice President, the Vietnam War, and his Presidential campaign. He was perhaps too close in time to those experiences to be candid, understandably too bitter, though bitter seems too strong a word, about those experiences to be completely objective about the people and his experiences But all in all, a great book about one of our true leaders from the mid 20th century

  5. 5 out of 5

    Leif Kurth

    Humphrey's story has a strong sense of "Americana" throughout. His upbringing in small town/rural South Dakota (values) and his yearning to be part of something bigger (duty to the public good/idealist) laid the foundation for his personal and professional transition to a progressive big city mayor (Minneapolis, 1945-'48) U.S. Senator, from Minnesota (1949-'64 & 1971-'78), and eventually Democratic nominee for the Presidency (1968 Presidential election). However, the journey is only part of Hump Humphrey's story has a strong sense of "Americana" throughout. His upbringing in small town/rural South Dakota (values) and his yearning to be part of something bigger (duty to the public good/idealist) laid the foundation for his personal and professional transition to a progressive big city mayor (Minneapolis, 1945-'48) U.S. Senator, from Minnesota (1949-'64 & 1971-'78), and eventually Democratic nominee for the Presidency (1968 Presidential election). However, the journey is only part of Humphrey's story. The work he did to move the Democratic Party in the direction of promoting Civil Rights and Voting Rights for African Americans (leading to passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964, & Voting Rights Act, 1965) his work to make the world better through ongoing dialogue and the Peace Corps, and his belief that the U.S. government was a necessary good that helped make all of our lives better, was what set his story apart from so many other politicians. He not only talked the talk, he walked the walk and was willing to compromise (work across the aisle) for the good of the American people.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Estlund

    This was an immensely interesting read, particularly given how much time I've spent reading about this time period. It was most interesting because of the difference in perspective. The LBJ books were about the time period, but from on "objective bystander's" point of view. This was in the man's own words. Very interesting counterpoint. I think this book--and the LBJ books--have prepared me adequately to read Halbertam's "The Best and the Brightest", a book I've wanted to read for many years now This was an immensely interesting read, particularly given how much time I've spent reading about this time period. It was most interesting because of the difference in perspective. The LBJ books were about the time period, but from on "objective bystander's" point of view. This was in the man's own words. Very interesting counterpoint. I think this book--and the LBJ books--have prepared me adequately to read Halbertam's "The Best and the Brightest", a book I've wanted to read for many years now.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    This was one the best political (auto)-biographies I've read. I previously only knew Humphrey as the Democratic loser of the '68 election. This candid revealing memoir outlines his life of victories and losses, doubts and hopes. He, along with Eleanor Roosevelt was one of the true liberal heroes of the mid-20th century. Especially as the line voice in congress for civil rights in 1948. I highly recommend this book for political history readers. This was one the best political (auto)-biographies I've read. I previously only knew Humphrey as the Democratic loser of the '68 election. This candid revealing memoir outlines his life of victories and losses, doubts and hopes. He, along with Eleanor Roosevelt was one of the true liberal heroes of the mid-20th century. Especially as the line voice in congress for civil rights in 1948. I highly recommend this book for political history readers.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dalton

    One of the greatest memoirs I have read. Though Humphrey's time in politics came and went long before me It shows the passion and dedication of a public servant who left a profound impact on modern progressive politics. One of the greatest memoirs I have read. Though Humphrey's time in politics came and went long before me It shows the passion and dedication of a public servant who left a profound impact on modern progressive politics.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Kaiser

    The dude loved and was inspired by his all-american, action-oriented father, and rightfully so. While I wish more of the book was directed around the Hubert's ideas and actions while in office, I can nonetheless appreciate the candidness with which he wrote this auto. The dude loved and was inspired by his all-american, action-oriented father, and rightfully so. While I wish more of the book was directed around the Hubert's ideas and actions while in office, I can nonetheless appreciate the candidness with which he wrote this auto.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tim Cahalan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Severin St.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

  14. 4 out of 5

    John

  15. 5 out of 5

    BookSwim.com Book Rental Online

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brad Hasskamp

  17. 4 out of 5

    David H Eil

  18. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mark Taylor

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jess Vogt

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  22. 5 out of 5

    William

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chad Fahning

  24. 5 out of 5

    Zouhair Ait Benhamou

  25. 4 out of 5

    Draper

  26. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Barker

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Hartigan

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.