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Giant-Size X-Men #1

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Introducing a new team of X-Men! Several key players in the X-Universe join the team including Storm, Nightcrawler, Colossus, and Wolverine!


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Introducing a new team of X-Men! Several key players in the X-Universe join the team including Storm, Nightcrawler, Colossus, and Wolverine!

30 review for Giant-Size X-Men #1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    A second air to the X-Men! This is a re-print of the now iconic “Giant-Size X-Men” #1 from the line of “Marvel True Believers”. Creative Team: Writer: Len Wein Illustrator: Dave Cockrum WHATEVER HAPPENED WITH THE X-MEN? Nowadays, having the X-Men and all its “X”-related titles as one of the strongest lines in Marvel Comics (and in the years before the Marvel Cinematic Universe, certainly the X-Men were without discussion the strongest ones), you could hardly believe that they would lack of bei A second air to the X-Men! This is a re-print of the now iconic “Giant-Size X-Men” #1 from the line of “Marvel True Believers”. Creative Team: Writer: Len Wein Illustrator: Dave Cockrum WHATEVER HAPPENED WITH THE X-MEN? Nowadays, having the X-Men and all its “X”-related titles as one of the strongest lines in Marvel Comics (and in the years before the Marvel Cinematic Universe, certainly the X-Men were without discussion the strongest ones), you could hardly believe that they would lack of being of interest for comic book readers, back at the beginning of the 70s. Stan Lee (that you may heard about him sometime) created along Jack Kirby (another one that you may heard too) the X-Men and while their original run lasted only 19 issues (1963-1965), they introduce dan absurd amount of staple elements in the series like Magneto, the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, The Scarlet Witch, Quicksilver, the Sentinels, Bolivar Trask and the Juggernaut, along with obviously the Professor X and the five original students: Cyclops, Jean Grey, Beast, Iceman and Angel. After its first run, other creative teams took the title (1965-1970) and they had the introduction of two new X-Men, Havok (Cyclops’s brother) and Lorna Dane (eventually Polaris), and even Beast “graduated” from the X-Men for some solo run and with the Avengers. However, astonishing (pun intended) that it may sound nowdays, the X-Men weren’t selling good at the end of the 60’s, and while the title remained being published after its #66 issues, they were re-printing old stories from #67 until #93 (1975) that honestly it was uncanny (other pun intended) to conceive that if the title wasn’t selling good with original stories, that Marvel kept it on the market for almost 5 years with re-printings. And therefore, for 5 years, nothing new was heard about the X-Men. It was until 1975 when the creative team of Len Wein & Dave Cockram did their now iconic Giant-Size X-Men #1, introducing a whole bunch of new characters along with some previously introduced mutants to form one heck of new politically-correct X-Men team featuring characters of several nationalities and ethnics (including certain character named Wolverine that you may heard sometime)… …and the bet paid off! The X-Men title was alive and kickin’ butts again, baby! Professor X recruits from around the world a new team of mutants to be lead by Cyclops (the only survivor of the last mission) for returning to the last place where the original X-Men were known to be, and facing a giant-size (the last pun intended, promise!) mysterious menace with vast powers beyond imagination.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Frankh

    Around the 1970's, Marvel stopped publishing new X-Men stories after issue #66 and instead spent time reprinting past issues. It's almost comparable to Doctor Who being gone in television in the UK since 1996 and only came back around 2005. Luckily, it only took five years before Marvel decided to publish a new story. Hence the sixty-eight paged Giant-Size X-Men #1 which was written by Len Wein and illustrated by Dave Cockrum who also served as its co-author. This was an important release becaus Around the 1970's, Marvel stopped publishing new X-Men stories after issue #66 and instead spent time reprinting past issues. It's almost comparable to Doctor Who being gone in television in the UK since 1996 and only came back around 2005. Luckily, it only took five years before Marvel decided to publish a new story. Hence the sixty-eight paged Giant-Size X-Men #1 which was written by Len Wein and illustrated by Dave Cockrum who also served as its co-author. This was an important release because not only did it mark the return of the strangest super-heroes of all in comics for some fresh material, it was also the same issue that served as a link between the old team composed of the core four members since its debut in the sixties: Cyclops, Marvel Girl, Iceman, Angel (minus Beast who left some time during the run) plus recruits, Havok and Lorna Dane, and that of the new ones as featured in the cover. Afterwards, publications for The Uncanny X-Men run resumed again with issue #94 which, of course, also finally began the sixteen-year career of one Chris Claremont, who was fated to define and turn the X-Men as one of the most formidable and widely successful Marvel titles to ever been in print. That was only possible because this contributing piece written by Len Wein and Dave Cockrum opened the doors for that, since they had wanted Claremont on the writing board themselves and therefore helped with the transition. It's inarguable that without the launch of Giant-Size X-Men #1, we may never have gotten to Claremont's X-Men which is a literary cruelty of the highest order, in my opinion. This issue also aimed to explain as to why the X-Men were absent in the last five years which turned out to be because they were abducted and stashed away in the island Krakoa during a mission to find another mutant. Only Cyclops was able to survive the ordeal and return to the Xavier School to recover and heal. Meanwhile, Professor X began recruiting across different parts of the world. For someone strictly wheelchair-bound, I have no idea how he is able to go about traveling, but hey, an excusable technicality. It was a montage of scenes, anyway. Perhaps the professor had some help around who never got to appear in the pages themselves. So in this issue, we get the appearances of Thunderbird (a new character at this point) and Sunfire which are two mutant characters I never really cared for, so I'm going to purposefully skip them and talk about the four other ones I have varying degrees of affection for. First, we have Kurt Wagner, the teleporter otherwise known as Nightcrawler. He was being chased around by an angry mob who are trying to kill him when Professor X put a stop to it. He then made a promise to help Kurt figure out some things about his lineage and ability, but all Kurt wants to be at this point is to be normal which was perfectly understandable but the professor was quick to challenge his concept of normalcy. Intrigued and probably with nowhere else to go or anyone else willing to take him in, Kurt agrees to come with him. Next we have Wolverine who already made his first appearance in The Incredible Hulk #181, and therefore a recognizable interesting character for the readers. In this issue, it was shown that he had been working for the Canadian government when Professor X wheels in the office to recruit him, making a pretty convincing argument as far as Wolverine is concerned. One of the bureaucrats tried to stop him but not one to nurse any fondness for authority figures, Wolverine latches out and threatens him not to get in the way. Professor X makes a stop to meet up with Banshee who cheerily went along for the ride without much coaxing. Professor X gets to Kenya, East Africa to encounter a self-fashioned goddess, Ororo Munroe who at first thought that the wheelchair-bound bald man was offering a ridiculous proposition, seeing as she didn't feel like leaving the comfortable lifestyle she has grown accustomed to. However, Charles Xavier knows exactly what to say and says things so poetically that Ororo was eventually swayed. Next, we have sweet Peter Rasputin of Russia who demonstrates his mutant strength as he saves a girl from being ran over by a tractor. I thought it was interesting that of all the recruits, he was the only one shown to use his abilities to rescue someone and that alone has made him automatically endearing to me especially when he began to contemplate about what Professor X tells him next. This is a guy who genuinely wants to help people when he knows he has the tools to do it, and is only reluctant because he has loved ones to leave behind. His family is very supportive which made it easy for him to make his decision to join the professor and see what else he can offer the world. So we throw in Thunderbird and Sunfire (who came off as an arrogant prick later on), and we get the new X-Men! Cyclops later arrives to explain their mission which is to save the original X-Men from the island of Krakoa. The rest of the pages showed that these new members are not that eager to work with one another (cough, Sunfire, cough) but they generally try to form some kind of teamwork anyway as they navigated through the mysterious island where Marvel Girl, Havok, Lorna Dane, Angel and Iceman have been held captive. After finding out that the mutant the original team has been looking for turns out to be the island itself (and the fact that Krakoa has been feeding on their energies for some time now), the new guys decided to fight the wretched creature together with the help of the professor's telepathic aid. The battle was more difficult than they imagined and as soon as they made their escape, they realized that the plane can only carry a minimum amount of passengers. Now the thirteen X-Men have to decide who is going to get left behind first. And this is where the issue gets cut short. Now, I already know what is going to happen next since these events will be once again tackled upon in the House of M-aftermath story, Deadly Genesis which I'll be reading in May. There's a rather wicked secret about this, and boy, it's going to be a doozy one. I think I won't talk about that here and would instead discuss it on my review for Deadly Genesis. The revelation is a rather game-changer for certain characters. I'm getting excited just thinking about it now. Overall, Giant-Size X-Men #1 is a worthy read not only because of posterity but also because it introduced four X-Men characters who will stick around and garner their own respective fanbase throughout the years. This issue also marks the beginning of the Claremont era. RECOMMENDED: 9/10 DO READ MY REVIEWS AT:

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tiag⊗

    The first X-relaunch, the birth of the modern X-Men, with the introduction of Krakoa and many of our favorite mutants, recommended for X-Men completists.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    The beginning of a new age for the X-Men! I loved getting to see the new characters individually and then how they all worked together as a team. The way they were able to incorporate all of these characters was pretty awesome! What came from this issue is incredible and I can't wait to read for myself what came after this iconic issue! The beginning of a new age for the X-Men! I loved getting to see the new characters individually and then how they all worked together as a team. The way they were able to incorporate all of these characters was pretty awesome! What came from this issue is incredible and I can't wait to read for myself what came after this iconic issue!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo

    If I have to choose one quintessential single issue X-Men story, this would be it. This book not only debuted the most popular line-up of the team but it also introduced the tropes that would be the staple of the X-Men books for years. Relaunched with new members a.k.a. "genesis", checked; Added former foes to the team, checked; Intra-team bickering, checked; Cyclops and Wolverine at odds, checked and teamwork action to win the day, checked. I first read in black and white but Dave Cockrum's powe If I have to choose one quintessential single issue X-Men story, this would be it. This book not only debuted the most popular line-up of the team but it also introduced the tropes that would be the staple of the X-Men books for years. Relaunched with new members a.k.a. "genesis", checked; Added former foes to the team, checked; Intra-team bickering, checked; Cyclops and Wolverine at odds, checked and teamwork action to win the day, checked. I first read in black and white but Dave Cockrum's powerful linework didn't made miss the colors. Seeing it in color for the first made me realize how good Cockrum was in his prime. This digital edition contains the original stories. The print version included reprints which bumped the page count to 68 pages. If you consider yourself an X-Men fan you should have at least a reprint of this in your collection. This is the good stuff.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ginny

    I've read quite a few different ages of X-Men now and this one has a very special place in my heart. The issue which introduced some of the most famous, and my favourite mutants, and relaunched the series. The colouring is great - so vivid but more varied than earlier series. Definitely a favourite of mine. I've read quite a few different ages of X-Men now and this one has a very special place in my heart. The issue which introduced some of the most famous, and my favourite mutants, and relaunched the series. The colouring is great - so vivid but more varied than earlier series. Definitely a favourite of mine.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    I don't normally review single issue comics but this is one of the top 5 most pivotal comics off all time to me. With the introduction of the new X-Men Byrne and Claremont begin their incredible industry changing run. Incredible art and storytelling that pretty much set the tone for comics for the next few decades. Highly recommended I don't normally review single issue comics but this is one of the top 5 most pivotal comics off all time to me. With the introduction of the new X-Men Byrne and Claremont begin their incredible industry changing run. Incredible art and storytelling that pretty much set the tone for comics for the next few decades. Highly recommended

  8. 4 out of 5

    Heather Fryling

    The X Men finally find their true form: an international team of misfits dedicated to world peace.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Etienne

    Good story but I was hoping for more background information on the new x-men (more on their origins, power, and more) maybe it will come in futures issues.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dannielle

    As my first official X-Men comic, I was very pleased with the story! I feel like it's a good taste of what X-Men comics are like and it wraps up rather nicely -- although I still want to know what happens next, which of course means moving on to Uncanny X-Men #94. That's not going to happen anytime soon since I can't afford to continue. As my first official X-Men comic, I was very pleased with the story! I feel like it's a good taste of what X-Men comics are like and it wraps up rather nicely -- although I still want to know what happens next, which of course means moving on to Uncanny X-Men #94. That's not going to happen anytime soon since I can't afford to continue.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    This one truly is a classic. This one is a game changer in a way that few comic books get to be as it relaunched the failed X-Men franchise

  12. 5 out of 5

    توفيق عبد الرحيم

    i am not sure why i didn't rate this before but it ushered the new age of x men i am not sure why i didn't rate this before but it ushered the new age of x men

  13. 5 out of 5

    James Turner

    Nightcrawler chased through a German village, Wolverine at a secret Canadian military base, Banshee watching a movie, Storm playing goddess in Africa, Sunfire relaxing at home in Japan, Colossus working the farm in Russia, Thunderbird chasing buffalo in Arizona, these are the heroes recruited by Professor X. The other X-men are missing and only Cyclops knows where they may be found. They travel to a mysterious island and face dangers before they find and rescue Angel, Polaris, Havok, Iceman, and Nightcrawler chased through a German village, Wolverine at a secret Canadian military base, Banshee watching a movie, Storm playing goddess in Africa, Sunfire relaxing at home in Japan, Colossus working the farm in Russia, Thunderbird chasing buffalo in Arizona, these are the heroes recruited by Professor X. The other X-men are missing and only Cyclops knows where they may be found. They travel to a mysterious island and face dangers before they find and rescue Angel, Polaris, Havok, Iceman, and Marvel Girl. The missing X-men were held captive by Krakoa the Living Island.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    We had a copy of this trade in our library and I saw it pass through and checked it out myself so that I could re-read the 7 collected issues from Giant-size X-men through X-men #99 and it was an enjoyable enough read minus Thunderbird's pretty much 24/7 pissed off attitude which grew rather old after a while. The trade ends with issue #99 which is a rather klunky cliff-hanger issue to end on, but for the most part just about every issue of the X-men back in those times was a cliff-hanger anyw We had a copy of this trade in our library and I saw it pass through and checked it out myself so that I could re-read the 7 collected issues from Giant-size X-men through X-men #99 and it was an enjoyable enough read minus Thunderbird's pretty much 24/7 pissed off attitude which grew rather old after a while. The trade ends with issue #99 which is a rather klunky cliff-hanger issue to end on, but for the most part just about every issue of the X-men back in those times was a cliff-hanger anyway. Oddly enough, Marvel just last month in December 2017 released a number of $1 one-shot comics reprinting a lot of the older Phoenix stories published by the company and one of the issues I did pick up was the reprinting of X-men #100 so I did get most of the story though #100 kind of leaves one hanging, but not as much as issue #99 did when it came out. If it was possible it would have made more sense for this trade to be Giant-size X-men #1 - X-men #100 for a more complete read. This is why I give this particular edition a 4 star rating and not a 5 star one. These stories do introduce the "new X-men" to the Marvel Universe made up of a more global unit than the prior five who were all American. So that alone was a major reason to celebrate this huge change in this team book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    James

    Thanks to these facsimile editions, I was finally able to read the coveted, widely talked about, Giant-Sized X-men #1. Yes of course it has some of that dated story telling style but I really dug this adventure. It’s cool to see some of the characters that I read about now make their first appearances. If you’re a big X-men fan like me, I def recommend getting this.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Walter Schwartz

    Return of the hiatus with an incredible story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gilbert Moreno

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Xavier assembles a team of new mutants to help bring back the old team (original X Men) from the mutant island of Krakoa

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Read on Marvel Unlimited. Starting my X-Men reading with this volume. From all the sources I've read, this is the best place to start X-Men and then continue with the Claremont's Uncanny X-Men at issue #94- I enjoyed this "gather the new team" volume to rescue "the old team." Even though it was written in 1975, it didn't feel that dated except for some 70s slang here and there. This is the comic that introduces Wolverine, Nightcrawler, Storm, and Colossus to the team. I initially got this from th Read on Marvel Unlimited. Starting my X-Men reading with this volume. From all the sources I've read, this is the best place to start X-Men and then continue with the Claremont's Uncanny X-Men at issue #94- I enjoyed this "gather the new team" volume to rescue "the old team." Even though it was written in 1975, it didn't feel that dated except for some 70s slang here and there. This is the comic that introduces Wolverine, Nightcrawler, Storm, and Colossus to the team. I initially got this from the library in the Essential X-Men volume 1 but I really don't like reading comics in black and white, so I ended up reading it on Marvel Unlimited.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andre

    Let's say it was interesting to see how much the characters either differ from their later incarnations and how much they and their background stayed the same over the years. Nightcrawler's scenes are a good first example of this: 1) That Bavarian village looks way too old and they even have torches despite it being 1975 (stayed the same over the dacades). 2) It is not actual prejudice to assume someone looking like Kurt is dangerous (changed all the time). 3) Nightcrawler howls (disappeared later o Let's say it was interesting to see how much the characters either differ from their later incarnations and how much they and their background stayed the same over the years. Nightcrawler's scenes are a good first example of this: 1) That Bavarian village looks way too old and they even have torches despite it being 1975 (stayed the same over the dacades). 2) It is not actual prejudice to assume someone looking like Kurt is dangerous (changed all the time). 3) Nightcrawler howls (disappeared later on) 4) What is stated about his past of being a carnival freak at "Der Jahrmarkt" contradicts later stories. 5) Why doesn't he just teleport away? (aways staed the same) Storm's scenes: 1) Why is she almost naked and the others clad? (her clothes go back and forth later) 2) Why is she worshipped as a goddess? Wasn't Kenya predominantly Christian back then also? (stayed the same) 3) Why were her eyes referred to be older than time if she is just a mutant? (never mentioned again) 4) Why are her eyes described to darken upon power use instead of whitening as they do later? 5) Does she know that strong rainfalls on "scorched" earth are not good? Later she knows, Furthemore let's ignore the stereotypical look and clothes of Shiro and his servants and ask ourselves why Colossus is called "Peter" instead of "Pjotr." And why is his "don't my powers belong to the state" comment even more stereotypical than Shiro's house? And then we get to Proudstar, who refers to his elders as squaws (as a derogatory term) and be ashamed for them dreaming of times past instead of their poverty stricken present (I looked Camp Verde, Arizona up, so I know). Plus he wears a headband, wrestles a bison to the ground and gets recruted by Charles playing on his childish vanity... wow, this guy must really hate his nation. Nd boy it really says something when Wolverine and Banshee have the most down to earth costumes. Storm looks like a stripper, Sunfire like giant goldfish, Collossus and Nightcrawler just look silly and Proudstar looks even more like a stereotype than before. Also there is a big question: If Hank McCoy (the Beast) was not with the first X-Men on their mission, why wasn't he contacted now for the rescue mission? Furthermore, Proudstar never much liked the jungle? How? There is no jungle in Arizona. And later we do see that Nightcrawler can teleport after all... why did he never do that before? And why is his laugh "little more than a hideous howl?" And considered that he was not at the temple before Sunfire makes me think they had the story before they added the characters and their powers. I don't know what is more ridiculous, the talking island that looks like Marvel's Man-Thing or the fact that neither "solar blasts" nor lightning bolts can hurt a giant plant monster. Also the comic downright says that mere words could never begin to describe the sheer unbridled savagery of the battle that follows--- so the writers won't even attempt it here! Translation: The writers simply aren't any good. And boy does the writing suck. If Storm can create a thunderstorm, why didn't she do so before? Just summon a cyclone (they have several flyers and a teleporter after all). And how would electricity recharge Lorna's magnetic powers? But that doesn't even begin to explain as to why they don't use Nightcrawler's powers or how magnetism can make gravity null and void, even for a moment. If I had to describe this story in one word it would be "contrived."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Not sure I have ever read the entire issue. That is the full issue. I started reading the Tribute Wein & Cockrum edition. And I thought I'd compare it to the original. MU has a facsimile edition...restored old timey ads and all. At the end of that are three short tales: one featuring Cyclops, one for Ice Man, and one for Jean Grey. I had never read those before. Decent, throw-away stories. But now I've finally read this full issue. The main story holds up well. And Krakoa is a lot more interesti Not sure I have ever read the entire issue. That is the full issue. I started reading the Tribute Wein & Cockrum edition. And I thought I'd compare it to the original. MU has a facsimile edition...restored old timey ads and all. At the end of that are three short tales: one featuring Cyclops, one for Ice Man, and one for Jean Grey. I had never read those before. Decent, throw-away stories. But now I've finally read this full issue. The main story holds up well. And Krakoa is a lot more interesting now.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vinicius Ferreira

    Around the 70s, Marvel stopped publishing new X-Men stories and spent time reprinting past issues, they were not a success at that point yet, but here came 1975, when they gave another shot, and with new focus and fire to write, and so it began This is the starting point if you want to read the X-men, i vividly recommend, some of the best story telling and origins come from this run, trully a master piece, and what comes after, its even better, enjoy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    em

    cute. but honestly.. these older comics.. skimmed.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Celo

    One (long) sentence review: Nah, this was (I Guess) just a starting point for the writers in their career. I didn't find anything appealing. But hey, maybe comics were for kids back then. One (long) sentence review: Nah, this was (I Guess) just a starting point for the writers in their career. I didn't find anything appealing. But hey, maybe comics were for kids back then.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mikey The High School Librarian

    Introducing all my favorite x-men team #2! Best line “What are we going to do with thirteen x-men?”

  25. 5 out of 5

    Autumn Bartee

    loved this a lot!! i’d love to see some of these characters in more recent comics/in film

  26. 5 out of 5

    TerrorKobra

    This is when the X-men got a "breath of fresh air" with new members joining the team, iconic characters like Wolverine, Storm, Nightcrawler and Colossus. Thunderbird, Banshee and Sunfire also join the team. This is when the X-men got a "breath of fresh air" with new members joining the team, iconic characters like Wolverine, Storm, Nightcrawler and Colossus. Thunderbird, Banshee and Sunfire also join the team.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Curtis

    I have been searching for eons to find a classic X-Men writer whose work I can really latch on to! That author appears to be Len Wein. Story, dialog, etc...all X-cellent! The work might breathe a little better without so many caption/narration boxes, but even those add to the charm of a bye-gone era. Writing: A+ Art: A+ Required reading for all X-men and Marvel fans!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    "I think we took the wrong bus, gang. This place sure doesn't look like Cleveland. All the insects in the air -- the overgrown jungle -- ! On second thought, maybe this is Cleveland." "I think we took the wrong bus, gang. This place sure doesn't look like Cleveland. All the insects in the air -- the overgrown jungle -- ! On second thought, maybe this is Cleveland."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

    It's the end of an era, and the beginning of a new one. SNIKT! It's the end of an era, and the beginning of a new one. SNIKT!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Blair

    Good start, but by modern standards, this is incredibly racist and sexist. I hated Thunderbird.

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