counter create hit Sunday's on the Phone to Monday - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Sunday's on the Phone to Monday

Availability: Ready to download

The Middlesteins meets The Virgin Suicides in this arresting family love story about the eccentric yet tightknit Simone family, coping with tragedy during 90s New York, struggling to reconnect with each other and heal. Claudio and Mathilde Simone, once romantic bohemians hopelessly enamored with each other, find themselves nestled in domesticity in New York, running a strug The Middlesteins meets The Virgin Suicides in this arresting family love story about the eccentric yet tightknit Simone family, coping with tragedy during 90s New York, struggling to reconnect with each other and heal. Claudio and Mathilde Simone, once romantic bohemians hopelessly enamored with each other, find themselves nestled in domesticity in New York, running a struggling vinyl record store and parenting three daughters as best they can: Natasha, an overachieving prodigy; sensitive Lucy, with her debilitating heart condition; and Carly, adopted from China and quietly fixated on her true origins. With prose that is as keen and illuminating as it is whimsical and luminous, debut novelist Christine Reilly tells the unusual love story of this family. Poignant and humane, Sunday's on the Phone to Monday is a deft exploration of the tender ties that bind families together, even as they threaten to tear them apart.


Compare
Ads Banner

The Middlesteins meets The Virgin Suicides in this arresting family love story about the eccentric yet tightknit Simone family, coping with tragedy during 90s New York, struggling to reconnect with each other and heal. Claudio and Mathilde Simone, once romantic bohemians hopelessly enamored with each other, find themselves nestled in domesticity in New York, running a strug The Middlesteins meets The Virgin Suicides in this arresting family love story about the eccentric yet tightknit Simone family, coping with tragedy during 90s New York, struggling to reconnect with each other and heal. Claudio and Mathilde Simone, once romantic bohemians hopelessly enamored with each other, find themselves nestled in domesticity in New York, running a struggling vinyl record store and parenting three daughters as best they can: Natasha, an overachieving prodigy; sensitive Lucy, with her debilitating heart condition; and Carly, adopted from China and quietly fixated on her true origins. With prose that is as keen and illuminating as it is whimsical and luminous, debut novelist Christine Reilly tells the unusual love story of this family. Poignant and humane, Sunday's on the Phone to Monday is a deft exploration of the tender ties that bind families together, even as they threaten to tear them apart.

30 review for Sunday's on the Phone to Monday

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andie

    This is a story that follows Claudio and Mathilde as they meet, fall hopelessly in love, and begin their family - up until their children are young adults themselves. It deals with the simple up and downs every family goes through while also covering serious and important topics such as mental illness, social issues, love and loss. The strength of this family is unending. I admit, it took me a little while to get into the writing style. I've seen others describe the writing as lyrical and I thin This is a story that follows Claudio and Mathilde as they meet, fall hopelessly in love, and begin their family - up until their children are young adults themselves. It deals with the simple up and downs every family goes through while also covering serious and important topics such as mental illness, social issues, love and loss. The strength of this family is unending. I admit, it took me a little while to get into the writing style. I've seen others describe the writing as lyrical and I think that's right on the money. This was completely different from anything I've previously read but once I got the hang of it, the flow was flawless and the plot engrossing. I really enjoyed reading each and every different point of view, children included, and the shortened chapters. While I don't think I got to fully know any of the characters intimately, I still CONNECTED to them. The beauty is that they all have their own flaws and quirks making them incredibly relatable. Being able to get inside each of their minds instead of having one narrator telling you about them really draws you close to them as individuals. My favorite character is probably Claudio's mentally ill sister, Jane. There is something so lovable about this woman and I just adore her. SUNDAY'S ON THE PHONE TO MONDAY was a joy to read and a book I would recommend picking up this summer. Kind of a slow build that ends with a bang and leaves you breathless. A beautifully moving story full of heart and emotion, but still reads lightly. This was a wonderful debut book and I think it's safe to say that we can expect some great things from this new author. Thank you to the author for sending me a copy of your book!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    "Sunday's on the Phone to Monday" (a lyric from "She Came In Through the Bathroom Window" by The Beatles) is beautifully heartbreaking novel from start to finish. Kudos to Christine Reilly for writing an incredible story. Her prose is poetic, serene, and intimate. The way she writes about the daily struggles/triumphs of the Simone Family was so mesmerizing. I felt like I knew these characters. I liked each one of them. They felt so REAL. It was such a relief to read about a family who actually l "Sunday's on the Phone to Monday" (a lyric from "She Came In Through the Bathroom Window" by The Beatles) is beautifully heartbreaking novel from start to finish. Kudos to Christine Reilly for writing an incredible story. Her prose is poetic, serene, and intimate. The way she writes about the daily struggles/triumphs of the Simone Family was so mesmerizing. I felt like I knew these characters. I liked each one of them. They felt so REAL. It was such a relief to read about a family who actually love and care about each other. Claudio (he owns a record vinyl store) and Mathilde (an aspiring actress) meet at a party. They soon fall in love and a year later, marry and begin their family. The Simone's have three daughters, Natasha (the smart one), Lucy (the sensitive one), and Carly (the inquisitive one). And the ending was so incredibly sad and yet gorgeous. I liked how Reilly wrote frankly about mental illness, homophobia, adoption, and life-threatening medical procedures. The only thing I'm disappointed about is how UNDERRATED this novel seems to be. I wish more people knew about it. It made me cry, gave me shivers, and made me think. I highly recommend it. Enjoy! Favorite line: "So, this won't be a love story. Nobody is trying to tell you something about love. This will be a story about a family."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Larry H

    I'd rate this 2.5 stars. This one just didn't work for me. Mathilde and Claudio meet at a party at NYU in 1998. Mathilde is an aspiring actress, creative and privileged, while Claudio left his home in Detroit and never looked back, working to buy a record shop in the heart of New York City. Their relationship consumes them both, sometimes whimsical, sometimes all-encompassing, but tremendously fulfilling, and it isn't long before they marry and begin building a somewhat Bohemian life together. The I'd rate this 2.5 stars. This one just didn't work for me. Mathilde and Claudio meet at a party at NYU in 1998. Mathilde is an aspiring actress, creative and privileged, while Claudio left his home in Detroit and never looked back, working to buy a record shop in the heart of New York City. Their relationship consumes them both, sometimes whimsical, sometimes all-encompassing, but tremendously fulfilling, and it isn't long before they marry and begin building a somewhat Bohemian life together. The couple raise three children—studious Natasha; creative, sensitive Lucy, who suffers from a rare heart ailment; and their adopted daughter Carly, empathetic, curious, and occasionally intense. As the girls deal with the usual and the unusual ups and downs of childhood and young adulthood, Claudio and Mathilde face their own challenges as well, mostly in the guise of Claudio's emotionally troubled sister, Jane, whom he moved from an unhealthy life in Louisiana to a mental hospital in New York. Sunday's on the Phone to Monday is a quirky, thought-provoking, and at times, emotionally compelling book about family and the powerful hold it can have over us, in both the best and worst of times. It's a story about love, about living life to the fullest you can imagine, and attempting to weather the storms that come your way. It's also a book about relationships—romantic, familial, platonic—and how they shape our worldviews and our actions. I thought Christine Reilly created some interesting, complex characters, but despite spending more than 300 pages with them, I never really felt as if I got to know them. I think this is because the book is told in short, vignette-like chapters, some of which happen within an hour or day of each other, some of which happen months, even years later. It's hard to get a hold on what is happening because much of the book is told in a somewhat stream-of-consciousness, dreamlike way that I found off-putting. The book's biggest quirk was the constant capitalization of the word "Heart," in whatever ways it was used (Heartache, Heartbreak, etc.). While I think I understand what Reilly was trying to achieve it stopped me in my tracks every time I saw that word capitalized in the middle of a sentence, and it is used quite a bit in this book. I don't know if this is intentional or if this is something that will be fixed before the book is officially released, but it really bothered me. I think Reilly definitely has talent and creativity, and knows how to paint beautiful visual pictures. While Sunday's on the Phone to Monday didn't click for me, perhaps people more comfortable with less linear, more dreamlike storytelling will find this moving and fulfilling. NetGalley, Edelweiss, and Touchstone provided an advance copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks for making it available! See all of my reviews at http://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blo....

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dan Kessler

    I received this book as an early reviewer. The author has an incredibly arresting, lyrical style. I was grabbed right away and found it incredibly fun to read. It is a very compelling multi-generational story that handles some very serious issues (mental illness specifically) in realistic, accessible, and moving ways. This is an excellent novel--a must read. And the author, Christine Reilly, is an author to watch... If this is her debut novel, then she has a very compelling and successful career I received this book as an early reviewer. The author has an incredibly arresting, lyrical style. I was grabbed right away and found it incredibly fun to read. It is a very compelling multi-generational story that handles some very serious issues (mental illness specifically) in realistic, accessible, and moving ways. This is an excellent novel--a must read. And the author, Christine Reilly, is an author to watch... If this is her debut novel, then she has a very compelling and successful career ahead of her.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brie

    I won this book in a Goodreads First Reads contest. I enjoyed this book. It captured the messiness of family life with all the highs and lows. The story is all about family members and their interconnected lives. Very much an emotion based story instead of a action plot based one. Very well done. It kept me reading to the end.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    Some families seem to attract tragedy and suffering. As we meet the Simone family they seem typical. Claudio meets Mathilda and they fall in love and marry. We also have Claudio's family including Jane, his sister. Different points of view are presented by the children, Natasha, Carly and Lucy. As the family deals with mental illness, medical problems and sexuality, they grow and bond into a unit of strength and courage. As a reader you become invested in each of the stories they tell and long t Some families seem to attract tragedy and suffering. As we meet the Simone family they seem typical. Claudio meets Mathilda and they fall in love and marry. We also have Claudio's family including Jane, his sister. Different points of view are presented by the children, Natasha, Carly and Lucy. As the family deals with mental illness, medical problems and sexuality, they grow and bond into a unit of strength and courage. As a reader you become invested in each of the stories they tell and long to share their heartbreak and joy. A great first novel by Ms. Reilly.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    There’s an oft-used quote by Tolstoy that all happy families are alike, but that’s not true, not really. The definition of “happy” can differ widely, and the definition of “family” can as well. Christine Reilly tells her readers straight out: “this will be a story about family.” The family in question is Claudio and Mathilde Simone and their three daughters: the overachieving Natasha, the middle sister Lucy who suffers from heart disease, and Carly, adopted from China. It also includes Sawyer, Ma There’s an oft-used quote by Tolstoy that all happy families are alike, but that’s not true, not really. The definition of “happy” can differ widely, and the definition of “family” can as well. Christine Reilly tells her readers straight out: “this will be a story about family.” The family in question is Claudio and Mathilde Simone and their three daughters: the overachieving Natasha, the middle sister Lucy who suffers from heart disease, and Carly, adopted from China. It also includes Sawyer, Mathilde’s gay brother, and Jane, Claudio’s schizophrenic sister. Family is an organic concept. As Sawyer’s partner says, “What was family? Just a set of people who thought you were obliged to them, for whatever reason. For helping you exist—or not.” Yet in reality, the Simones do more than help each other exist. They help each other find meaning in a life that is often mystery-shrouded. Two things raise Sunday’s On The Phone With Monday above the usual exploration of a diverse – and let’s face it, all too often derivative – family drama. The first is Christine Reilly’s unique and lyrical slant. Her distinct alchemy is to mine the essence of her story, capturing the gold and letting the debris slip away. In this way, her novel becomes almost mythical. For example, we are not exposed to the brutal medical realities of heart transplantation (such as in the very graphic book Sick Girl by Amy Silverstein). Rather, Lucy is a life force, a catalyst who illuminates the lives of others. Her antithesis might be Aunt Jane; Lucy is hurting to live and for Jane, living itself means hurting. Secondly, I don’t recall any other novel that comes with its own playlist. The author wisely recognizes that each of our lives is accompanied by a soundtrack and nearly 50 songs – from the Beatles to Elton John and Bob Dylan – are alluded to within these pages. The song references ground the reader, both in place and time, and in intent without becoming overwhelming. Christine Reilly’s affectation is to capitalize the word Heart, even if it’s in the midst of a sentence (SweetHeart). The reception to this will depend on the reader; for me, it got a little cloying. Still, this is a debut novel with heart. There’s a whimsical sweetness to it that eventually captures one’s own Heart.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Tragically beautiful. I loved it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lorilin

    Claudio and Mathilde Simone, once wild young things scraping by in the city, are now living quietly and comfortably in the suburbs of New York, raising their three daughters Natasha, Lucy, and Carly. As a family, the Simones are quirky, artsy, and quintessentially cool. Mathilde is a mildly successful actress, and, for the most part, is content with the life she's made for herself. Claudio owns a record store that he's able to keep afloat with help from an inheritance Mathilde receives after her Claudio and Mathilde Simone, once wild young things scraping by in the city, are now living quietly and comfortably in the suburbs of New York, raising their three daughters Natasha, Lucy, and Carly. As a family, the Simones are quirky, artsy, and quintessentially cool. Mathilde is a mildly successful actress, and, for the most part, is content with the life she's made for herself. Claudio owns a record store that he's able to keep afloat with help from an inheritance Mathilde receives after her parents die. That money also goes toward helping Claudio's sister, Jane, who is in and out of mental hospitals for treatment for schizophrenia. Each daughter has her own unique and well-developed story arc, too. Natasha is the typical over-achieving oldest sibling. She is almost unbelievably gifted academically, and somehow good at everything she tries. On the outside she appears to have it all together, but inside she's feeling buried by the responsibility of watching over everyone, especially her sisters, and keeping the family together. Lucy is the sweet, middle child, the emotional heart of the family--also a major cause of worry for all, as she is dealing with a severe, life-threatening heart condition. Carly is the youngest daughter, adopted from China, and confused about how she fits in her own life and family. Unbeknownst to anyone else, she's secretly pining to connect with her birth mother. The first hundred or so pages of the book focus mostly on Claudio and Mathilde--their backstories, how they met, what their marriage is like--basically everything about them pre-children. But in the rest of the story, they all but disappear, and the focus is on their daughters and Claudio's sister. If I could change one thing about this book (aside from the title), I would get rid of this introductory section on Claudio and Mathilde almost entirely. It's slow and even irritating at times. Claudio and Mathilde are just so very "too cool for school." If ever there were a moment when I considered not finishing the book, it was within those first few pages. But, oh, how glad I am that I persevered! The rest of the book, the part that focuses on the daughters, is magnificent. I fell in love with these characters. Lucy and Jane get the most play--and theirs are the stories I felt most connected to--but I also felt like I knew and understood Natasha and Carly, too. It's not easy creating so many whole, believable characters, but author Reilly does exactly that. By far the best thing about this book, though, is the writing. It's poetic and surprising. Reilly uses metaphor, comparison, imagery to describe the same old everyday stuff of life in creative and striking ways. For example, "She tried memorizing everything about the [Holocaust] survivor--a ninety-three-year old woman named Hannah--the crash of her voice, the shape of her earlobes--eggy and free, like ultrasound waves." When Reilly describes something--even earlobes!--I can see it in my mind perfectly. I am right there with her. There were many, many times when I'd finish a paragraph and have to put the book down for a second, simply to process the awesomeness of what I just read. The writing is so, so good. Sunday's on the Phone to Monday is probably one of the best books I've read this year. I'm not going to lie, I cried. A lot. But it was so nice to feel effortlessly connected to these characters and to their stories. I still can't believe this is Christine Reilly's debut novel. I can't wait for the next one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eunice Moral

    This book has this melancholic feel to it, the kind of melancholia a reader craves once in a while. It scratches a different itch that not all books could. This book was sent to me by the author in an exchange for an honest review. From the moment I read the blurb, it instantly piqued my interest, though not really something right up my alley, but this book sounded different, it seems like it has its own gravitational pull and the reader will just fall into it like it is the most natural thin This book has this melancholic feel to it, the kind of melancholia a reader craves once in a while. It scratches a different itch that not all books could. This book was sent to me by the author in an exchange for an honest review. From the moment I read the blurb, it instantly piqued my interest, though not really something right up my alley, but this book sounded different, it seems like it has its own gravitational pull and the reader will just fall into it like it is the most natural thing. And I did, I succumbed to it, immersed myself in the story like nothing mattered in the world, because for a moment the only thing that mattered was the lives of the characters inside this beautiful book. Sunday's on the Phone to Monday is not your typical read, it is not something you encounter on a regular basis. It was truly a gem. It was all encompassing, covering all facets of life such as love, family, mental illness, the society, loss and so much more. It was life encapsulated into a single book. It was the connection of all the characters that made this book stand out, there was the conventional relationship and the not so usual ones, but everything jived into this perfect harmony that you just couldn't help but be engrossed by it. It was melancholic as it was raw. The book was written so beautifully, I actually ran out out of sticky tabs. There are so many great passages written here, reflections about life and love. The one thing I noticed about this book was how relatable it was. It magnified the simple things, and we are all aware about the saying that sometimes it is the small things that truly matter. Has this happened to you? Like for an instance you are thinking about a certain thing, it was just something nonsensical, and a little silly to share with others so you just keep it to yourself? This book, assured me that whatever I was thinking, or whatever feeling I was having no matter how silly or noncommittal, that it still counts, or matters. I loved that in a book, the way it reaches out to its readers, how every experience real or fictional, came from something that existed long before us. That what we truly feel and think is universal, and there was some sense of comfort in that. As I was reading this book, it kind of gave off The Bell Jar vibe, which as most of us already know is one of the most depressing books written of all time. It wasn't entirely like The Bell Jar, but there are bits and parts of the book that instantly reminded me of Sylvia Plath's novel. I cannot say that the similarity is palpable, but there was hint of it in this book, making it more engaging and interesting. If you enjoyed The Bell Jar, I think you'll like this book as well, but don't go on expecting something as depressing, let's just put it this way, Sunday's on The Phone to Monday will give you that nostalgic feeling that no other book could. The characters in this story were different in their own ways. They are readily identifiable from each other. I loved how the story started the way it did, it was like a journey of some sort with bits and pieces of flashbacks that make it coherent and polished. I learned that this book was originally intended to be a poetry book, and I can definitely see the beautiful play on words. It was lyrical in every sense of the word. The book will leave you with a calm feeling. It was the peace and quiet after a heavy down pour, it was proportional to the feeling of sipping a hot cup of tea in a cold rainy afternoon. It is as if, everything in the world is okay once more. It is the kind of book that need not require exaggerated events, or heart stopping twists, it was as true and as raw as it could get and there is definitely beauty in that. I loved this book, I wish everyone could find time to read it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tess

    This book is so incredibly sad. I was not prepared for that! The story of a family in New York, from the parent’s meeting until their children are young adults, is nuanced, powerful, and heartbreaking. The writing is beautiful, and flows so easily. The characters were well developed, and drew me in immediately. I felt like I knew them, and because of that, the twists and turns (though at times melodramatic) were powerful and unexpected. I admit the ending made me cry though, so just a big FYI. It This book is so incredibly sad. I was not prepared for that! The story of a family in New York, from the parent’s meeting until their children are young adults, is nuanced, powerful, and heartbreaking. The writing is beautiful, and flows so easily. The characters were well developed, and drew me in immediately. I felt like I knew them, and because of that, the twists and turns (though at times melodramatic) were powerful and unexpected. I admit the ending made me cry though, so just a big FYI. It may be because a few of the characters reminded me so much of people in my life who had similar tragic stories. This certainly doesn’t take away from the big, and it’s big ideas though. The water of a New York family dealing with life may be throughly treaded, but that still didn’t take away from how beautifully easy and enjoyable this was to read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    I love that this book is about family. It's a love story only in the nature of how the Simone/Spicer family manages to support each other in difficult times. The prose is beautiful; the poetic background of the author becomes apparent early in the novel, and we even get to see it manifested within a character. I found this novel extremely deep, thoughtful, and relatable. The author gave us a character with mental illness that I think is so very important to today's culture. As mental illness is b I love that this book is about family. It's a love story only in the nature of how the Simone/Spicer family manages to support each other in difficult times. The prose is beautiful; the poetic background of the author becomes apparent early in the novel, and we even get to see it manifested within a character. I found this novel extremely deep, thoughtful, and relatable. The author gave us a character with mental illness that I think is so very important to today's culture. As mental illness is becoming less "taboo," it's great to see prominent characters (who are actually likable!) struggling with mental illness and I appreciated that it was an accurate portrayal with lucid periods as well as episodic periods. I really enjoyed this one~it made me think; it made me cry. I highly recommend this one. Incredible read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    An amazing multi generational story of a family. Lyrical and moving, in particular the author writes very well about mental illness.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gwen

    Hauntingly beautiful book about a family who loves pop music and each other and who act like a real family, warts and all. I received this book free from Goodreads First Reads.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    This book will make you feel. Sunday's on the phone to monday, by Christine Reilly is an interesting little book. It's about a family, the Simones, and what happens to them. Probably some of the same stuff you and your family have been through. But isn't it nice to know someone else has been there too? The story POV jumps around between all of the characters which gives them all some depth. The beginning is slow, but be patient. It's worth your time. Very emotional at the end. Saw some reviews t This book will make you feel. Sunday's on the phone to monday, by Christine Reilly is an interesting little book. It's about a family, the Simones, and what happens to them. Probably some of the same stuff you and your family have been through. But isn't it nice to know someone else has been there too? The story POV jumps around between all of the characters which gives them all some depth. The beginning is slow, but be patient. It's worth your time. Very emotional at the end. Saw some reviews that questioned how realistic Claudio's record store is - but it's NYC. There's a store for everything. Someone probably has an 8-track store. Lots of music references. And you'll hum "She came in through the bathroom window" every time you read it. Nice debut from Ms. Reilly

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This book was likable. I didn't know what it was about until the end.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura.125Pages

    This review was originally posted on www.125pages.com I have been anticipating Sunday's on the Phone to Monday for months. I checked and my first mention of it on the site was back in December 2015. When I received the ARC I wanted to read it right away, but schedules and all that. I also was leery as it couldn't be as good as I hoped. I had built it up to a point that I was sure I would be disappointed. And for the first few chapters I was. Claudio and Mathilde, in the beginning, were just This review was originally posted on www.125pages.com I have been anticipating Sunday's on the Phone to Monday for months. I checked and my first mention of it on the site was back in December 2015. When I received the ARC I wanted to read it right away, but schedules and all that. I also was leery as it couldn't be as good as I hoped. I had built it up to a point that I was sure I would be disappointed. And for the first few chapters I was. Claudio and Mathilde, in the beginning, were just too cool and NYC hip. But then, their backstories began to come out and I started to like them. However, once their children entered the story I loved them. Natasha, Lucy and Carly were the heart of the story. Once they entered it changed the whole dynamic in a very powerful way. The plot was very unique; it encompassed a family and the myriad happenings of almost everyday life in a very powerful way. Christine Reilly's writing was suburb; nuanced and vivid. The pacing had a few issues in the beginning but once the girls came in, it was smooth. The world built also had a few glitches in the beginning but again, once the daughters came in it became very real. Ah, the emotions. Sunday's on the Phone to Monday broke me at the end. This was no dainty sniffle book, but rather a throat tightening, gut punch kindof read. The characters were the true heart of Sunday's on the Phone to Monday. The three girls wrapped around each other in a powerful way and their love for one another trickled to the other characters and once you saw them in their light you had no choice to also love them. Sunday's on the Phone to Monday is a powerhouse of a book. Full of emotions and hidden gems, it is a read to savor. Christine Reilly's debut speaks of great things to come from an author with a true and unique voice. Favorite lines - Claudio could divide his life into before fatherhood and after fatherhood. Before he was a father, Claudio swore that there was nothing he could love more than rock and roll. And then he had his daughters, and it wasn’t even that he loved them more than rock and roll. It was that they were rock and roll. Biggest cliché - As long as we're cool we'll be fine. Have you read Sunday's on the Phone to Monday, or added it to your TBR? This book was most likely received free from the publisher/author in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lesa Parnham

    This may be my favorite book of the year thus far. As the book is described, it is lyrical. There are not many book that you can say that you saw something to love in each character. Each family member is well drawn out. I liked the more vulnerable characters the best Mathilde, Lucy, Jane and Sawyer. The other characters in this book are also complete with their faults and beauty. There are parts of this book that took my breath away, the writing is stunning. I give this book my highest rating a This may be my favorite book of the year thus far. As the book is described, it is lyrical. There are not many book that you can say that you saw something to love in each character. Each family member is well drawn out. I liked the more vulnerable characters the best Mathilde, Lucy, Jane and Sawyer. The other characters in this book are also complete with their faults and beauty. There are parts of this book that took my breath away, the writing is stunning. I give this book my highest rating and I thank Ms. Reilly for restoring my love of a wonderful book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gigi

    For some reason, I wasn't expecting this book to be so well-written and full of such beautiful prose that left me lingering, re-reading. Moving, honest story of a screwed up family, brutally observant and familiar. Slow build and a bit of a sleeper, I'll be recommending to friends' Summer TBR piles. This book has Heart.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Dedik

    Really enjoyed reading this - unique style and story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erica Parker

    I received an ARC of this novel from NetGalley. Oh, how I loved this book. The Simones - Claudio, Mathilde, their kids and their assorted family members - each and every one of them - feel like real, developed, flawed people, just as they should. These people live and are lived in and it was intoxicating to be allowed to fall so far into their lives and their worlds. The Simone family isn't perfect but they still are people that it's easy to fall in love with and easy to care for. It's true that y I received an ARC of this novel from NetGalley. Oh, how I loved this book. The Simones - Claudio, Mathilde, their kids and their assorted family members - each and every one of them - feel like real, developed, flawed people, just as they should. These people live and are lived in and it was intoxicating to be allowed to fall so far into their lives and their worlds. The Simone family isn't perfect but they still are people that it's easy to fall in love with and easy to care for. It's true that you spend the entire novel without feeling as though you really know them intimately...but I felt as though that's entirely the point. How well do we really know anyone, no matter how much time you spend with them. Cypher though she is, I think Jane, Claudio's sister, might be my favorite character. She's mentally ill and a mess, and she tries so hard. She's heartbreaking in the messiest way and I love her. I'm so glad I was able to experience "Sunday's on the Phone to Monday". I'll buy a physical copy and I can't wait to read more of Reilly's work.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Denise K.

    This book was unusual and quite good. It was the sort of book that I'd forget about for a day or so, then become utterly absorbed in the language as soon as I started again. The prose is lyrical (Reilly is a poet and the book, in fact, started off as a poem) and the dialogue, interestingly, is set in italics, a style typically used for thoughts. As I read farther into the book, though, I realized that maybe that wasn't a mistake. This book's strength is in the way it exposes people's inner dialo This book was unusual and quite good. It was the sort of book that I'd forget about for a day or so, then become utterly absorbed in the language as soon as I started again. The prose is lyrical (Reilly is a poet and the book, in fact, started off as a poem) and the dialogue, interestingly, is set in italics, a style typically used for thoughts. As I read farther into the book, though, I realized that maybe that wasn't a mistake. This book's strength is in the way it exposes people's inner dialogue, and I was downright engrossed with how realistic and weird the minds of the characters are. Plus, it's a sad and beautiful story. Y'all know what a sucker I can be for that.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pam Mooney

    I loved this book! It is beautifully written and very original. The story drew me in immediately as I loved the multi-generation story. I became attached to the characters who were so different and yet the same in their personal struggles and interactions with each other. The family as whole was painted so clearly that I was sure I would recognize them if they moved in next door. While the story is incredibly sad I was happy to have known this family and shared their journey. A good read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura Henderson

    The author Christine gives this book beautiful prose. Her writing style to me while may have started a little slow turned into this beautiful fluidity that envelops you. She gives her book several POVs, which i love and she does with a great poeticness. The book focuses on a family and how families always have ups and downs, and what it means to be an actual family. Through the strength that ties them together and to the gasping, shocking end, this book will definitely keep you interested. This The author Christine gives this book beautiful prose. Her writing style to me while may have started a little slow turned into this beautiful fluidity that envelops you. She gives her book several POVs, which i love and she does with a great poeticness. The book focuses on a family and how families always have ups and downs, and what it means to be an actual family. Through the strength that ties them together and to the gasping, shocking end, this book will definitely keep you interested. This is definitely an upcoming writer to watch out for!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Claudio and Matilde are a couple with 3 daughters, one of whom needs a new heart and another who is adopted. The characters are all impossibly unique. Just when you think you've got them figured out, the author digs a little deeper and explains their emotions in a way that is totally engaging and intriguing. A very unique read!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    "Claudio could divide his life into before fatherhood and after fatherhood. Before he was a father, Claudio swore that there was nothing he could love more than rock and roll. And then he had his daughters, and it wasn't even that he loved them more than rock and roll. It was that they were rock and roll."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tasnim

    I was given a free ebook copy of Sunday's On the Phone to Monday by the author in return for an honest review. However, all opinions stated are my own. "So, this won't be a love story. Nobody is trying to tell you something about love. This will be a story about a family." First of all, I don't really agree with the quote. If we're talking about families, we're talking about love. They're related. However, the book does revolve mainly around a family. That's what I loved about it mostly. I mean, I I was given a free ebook copy of Sunday's On the Phone to Monday by the author in return for an honest review. However, all opinions stated are my own. "So, this won't be a love story. Nobody is trying to tell you something about love. This will be a story about a family." First of all, I don't really agree with the quote. If we're talking about families, we're talking about love. They're related. However, the book does revolve mainly around a family. That's what I loved about it mostly. I mean, I always read fantasy books and/or contemporaries where two young characters meet and fall in love, yada yada, but this book is far more than that. Sunday's On the Phone to Monday tells the story of how life is after marriage. It tells the story of two different people creating a family of their own and trying their best to protect the pople that they love. This book was told in many different povs, which I loved because I got to know everyone's thoughts. The relationship between the three daughters of Mathilde and Claudio (they are the main subject of the story by the way), is so honest and true that I couldn't help but to admire. The writing is so dreamlike. When I was reading the book, I felt as if I was watching a dream. I don't know if that makes sense lol. This book is actually not suitable for young readers so I did skip some parts that made me uncomfortable. But other than that, it was great. The ending broke my heart, and me being me, I cried a little. Overall, I really enjoyed this book. If you're in the mood for some kinda-heavy-but-beautiful reads, this book is the one for you.

  28. 5 out of 5

    miss.mesmerized mesmerized

    Mathilde, a young actress, finds in Claudio, a record store manager, the love of her life. From the beginning it is clear that they will spend the rest of their days together and have a family. Two lovely daughters are born quickly and a third, adopted one, completes the family. Life could be perfect, but Claudio has a sister who has always struggled from her mental illnesses and Mathilde’s brother is gay and cannot have a family in the same way his sister does. When the girls get older, other p Mathilde, a young actress, finds in Claudio, a record store manager, the love of her life. From the beginning it is clear that they will spend the rest of their days together and have a family. Two lovely daughters are born quickly and a third, adopted one, completes the family. Life could be perfect, but Claudio has a sister who has always struggled from her mental illnesses and Mathilde’s brother is gay and cannot have a family in the same way his sister does. When the girls get older, other problems arise and the biggest challenge for the family is set when the heart of one of the girls gets too weak to beat on. I really liked reading Christine Reilly’s novel. Her characters are interestingly drawn, their problems are real and imaginable. The dialogues show liveliness and the overall tone of the novel is a great joy to read. However, when I finished the book, I was wondering what it was about. It is especially the relationships that could captivate and convince me, but considering it all, they were like touched and abandoned soon after. Mathilde and Claudio are a very interesting couple, so are Claudio and his sister Jane or Mathilde and her brother. Also the girls amongst themselves or with their boyfriends – so many good ideas which could have filled novels on their own. Of course, the novel as it is somehow complete, but it lacked a bit of focus. Nevertheless, a story which I can really recommend, especially if you are looking for something slightly sad.

  29. 5 out of 5

    liza (bookotter)

    Christine was so kind to send this book to me, thank you! 3.5 This book focuses on family and its ups and downs. It is something different that what I mostly read. I had a bit of a hard time getting into this book but went well after a few chapters. (The writing is beautiful and very poetic!) What I loved the most about this book is that the chapters were short and the different point of views from the characters, it made me feel like I personally got to know them really good. The characters were Christine was so kind to send this book to me, thank you! 3.5 This book focuses on family and its ups and downs. It is something different that what I mostly read. I had a bit of a hard time getting into this book but went well after a few chapters. (The writing is beautiful and very poetic!) What I loved the most about this book is that the chapters were short and the different point of views from the characters, it made me feel like I personally got to know them really good. The characters were all so well developed! Jane was my absolute favorite. This book makes you laugh, makes you cry. So get your tissues ready.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Another library grab, and another first novel. In the beginning, I had a hard time finding the pieces of the back story interesting. I liked Claudio, but found Mathilde unapproachable. This remained true for most of the book. Perhaps she isn't given enough narrative voice? The sections where Jane narrated were hard for me. I saw the parallel between Jane and Lucy, and the different ways their illnesses shaped the family were engaging. There is some really beautiful writing here. For example, "Th Another library grab, and another first novel. In the beginning, I had a hard time finding the pieces of the back story interesting. I liked Claudio, but found Mathilde unapproachable. This remained true for most of the book. Perhaps she isn't given enough narrative voice? The sections where Jane narrated were hard for me. I saw the parallel between Jane and Lucy, and the different ways their illnesses shaped the family were engaging. There is some really beautiful writing here. For example, "The sky was a carnival of ruby and salsa, suffusing in to a low point of cobalt. This could have been a nice place for a picnic." (303)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.