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From the world's most respected wine critic, the essential guide to wine in 100 pages Wine is now one of the most popular drinks in the world. Many wine drinkers wish they knew more about it without having to understand every detail or go on a wine course. In The 24-Hour Wine Expert, Jancis Robinson shares her expertise with authority, wit and approachability. From the diffe From the world's most respected wine critic, the essential guide to wine in 100 pages Wine is now one of the most popular drinks in the world. Many wine drinkers wish they knew more about it without having to understand every detail or go on a wine course. In The 24-Hour Wine Expert, Jancis Robinson shares her expertise with authority, wit and approachability. From the difference between red and white, to the shape of bottles and their labels, descriptions of taste, colour and smell, to pairing wine with food and the price-quality correlation, Robinson helps us make the most of this mysteriously delicious drink. Jancis Robinson has been called 'the most respected wine critic and journalist in the world' by Decantermagazine. In 1984 she was the first person outside the wine trade to qualify as a Master of Wine. The Financial Times wine writer, she is the author/editor of dozens of wine books, including Wine Grapes (Allen Lane), The Oxford Companion to Wine (OUP) and The World Atlas of Wine (Mitchell Beazley). Her award-winning website, www.JancisRobinson.com has subscribers in 100 countries.


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From the world's most respected wine critic, the essential guide to wine in 100 pages Wine is now one of the most popular drinks in the world. Many wine drinkers wish they knew more about it without having to understand every detail or go on a wine course. In The 24-Hour Wine Expert, Jancis Robinson shares her expertise with authority, wit and approachability. From the diffe From the world's most respected wine critic, the essential guide to wine in 100 pages Wine is now one of the most popular drinks in the world. Many wine drinkers wish they knew more about it without having to understand every detail or go on a wine course. In The 24-Hour Wine Expert, Jancis Robinson shares her expertise with authority, wit and approachability. From the difference between red and white, to the shape of bottles and their labels, descriptions of taste, colour and smell, to pairing wine with food and the price-quality correlation, Robinson helps us make the most of this mysteriously delicious drink. Jancis Robinson has been called 'the most respected wine critic and journalist in the world' by Decantermagazine. In 1984 she was the first person outside the wine trade to qualify as a Master of Wine. The Financial Times wine writer, she is the author/editor of dozens of wine books, including Wine Grapes (Allen Lane), The Oxford Companion to Wine (OUP) and The World Atlas of Wine (Mitchell Beazley). Her award-winning website, www.JancisRobinson.com has subscribers in 100 countries.

30 review for The 24-Hour Wine Expert

  1. 5 out of 5

    Raúl

    Hi Jancis, (can I call you Jancis?) I'm writing in regards to your 24-hour Wine Expert book. It was a delightful read throughout, but I have a few concerns I'd like to address with you; my friend Ryan (he's a wine specialist, although I'm not sure if of the 24-hour variety) said I could write to you. First, I think the title is confusing: will I become a wine expert only if I read the book within 24 hours? I'm concerned about my liver if that's the case - or maybe following your tasting exercises Hi Jancis, (can I call you Jancis?) I'm writing in regards to your 24-hour Wine Expert book. It was a delightful read throughout, but I have a few concerns I'd like to address with you; my friend Ryan (he's a wine specialist, although I'm not sure if of the 24-hour variety) said I could write to you. First, I think the title is confusing: will I become a wine expert only if I read the book within 24 hours? I'm concerned about my liver if that's the case - or maybe following your tasting exercises will elevate one's mental state to that of an expert. Perhaps it is that I'll become one 24h after finishing it. Sort of like a next-day-delivery mechanism. Please clarify. Second, I'm not totally sure what to do when you present conflicting pieces of information. For example: when you talk about taste descriptors, you start by saying that a beginner's vocabulary is best kept unspoiled, and that whatever words come to their minds are the correct ones; which you immediately follow with a list of a hundred industry-standard terms to describe the taste of wine. Does that mean that to become a wine expert one must sacrifice their unexperienced, pure, immaculate vocabulary and favor that of the wine professionals of yore? I was brought up catholic, so I'm familiar with these acts of personal punishment and mutilation in order to deserve a better future, I'm just checking. I very much enjoyed the descriptions you wrote of the different grapes and specially the wine producing regions. I just wish they didn't feel as much of an afterthought as they do and they were more intertwined with the rest of the content. It was hard to go back and look for concepts described fifty pages prior, principally because I didn't have much of my 24-hour budget left (and the glasses of wine that came with it). In general, I think this is a very nice introduction and a good reference book to have, particularly for its very portable size. I am happy I bought it and learned a lot about the drink. Unfortunately, I must admit I do not feel much closer to being an expert, but I won't hold it against you, I must have done something wrong. Thank you very much, I hope you have a terrific day, -Raúl

  2. 4 out of 5

    Saria Beainy

    In October of 2017, I was approached by one of the country's top wineries and presented with free tuition for the WSET Level 1 Award. Even though I still had months to go - and knew practically everything relevant to this level - I took it upon myself to educate myself in every way possible. Among the very first books I bought was Jancis Robinson's The 24-Hour Wine Expert. The book promises to give you a 360 degree knowledge of wine. And, happily, the book delivers on its promise. The first prom In October of 2017, I was approached by one of the country's top wineries and presented with free tuition for the WSET Level 1 Award. Even though I still had months to go - and knew practically everything relevant to this level - I took it upon myself to educate myself in every way possible. Among the very first books I bought was Jancis Robinson's The 24-Hour Wine Expert. The book promises to give you a 360 degree knowledge of wine. And, happily, the book delivers on its promise. The first promise it makes and delivers is how quickly you can read this book. If you have a lazy day to spare on your calendar, then by all means make a cup of coffee - not wine just yet - and start reading. It's a 100-ish page book written with wit and authority, yet reads smoothly and easily. I finish my first read-through in one weekend. However, from January 14 to February 24, I went through this book 3 more times. The other 3 times were more leisurely, as I got a pen and some sticky notes and starting taking quotes, notes, and exercise tips from this little gold mine. While the title is a stretch - because 24 hours will never make you an expert on anything, really - but the book does tackle everything you may have questions about if you're new to wine. It also equips you with more than enough exercises to kick start your tasting skills. Robinson sheds light on everything related to the wine world, even if very briefly. She talks about the difference between wine colors; bottle shapes; wine labels; taste, color, and smell descriptors; wine grapes; and wine regions. She also discusses wine pairings and the price-to-quality relation. I have read more than a few wine books since I first started my wine blog a year ago, and I can honestly say this should be the very first book you buy if you decide to pursue and grow your interest in wine.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Lopez

    Exactly what the title says.. well, I wouldn't say you would be an expert, but you could certainly be able to pick out an appropriate wine, and maybe let down your hair and try a few you wouldn't normally buy. Exactly what the title says.. well, I wouldn't say you would be an expert, but you could certainly be able to pick out an appropriate wine, and maybe let down your hair and try a few you wouldn't normally buy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Seddon

    I would recommend this as a starting point for anyone who wants to learn more about wine. I think I learned a lot although I imagine I'll be referring back to it regularly and maybe sometimes keeping it in my bag (it's size comes in handy there). Short and to the point, if this undaunting guide is not enough to whet your appetite then it'll at least provide enough interesting facts to serve as a conversation starter at dinner parties. I would recommend this as a starting point for anyone who wants to learn more about wine. I think I learned a lot although I imagine I'll be referring back to it regularly and maybe sometimes keeping it in my bag (it's size comes in handy there). Short and to the point, if this undaunting guide is not enough to whet your appetite then it'll at least provide enough interesting facts to serve as a conversation starter at dinner parties.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Ferguson

    Granted I took a bit longer than 24 hours to read it, but that was because I spent some time trying wines in between. While you won’t become a Master Somm by any means, this book gives you an unpretentious, easily digestible, and well written introduction to the wide world of wine. I particularly enjoyed some of the myth-busting elements, and the removal of some of the haughty preconceptions I’ve had about the world of wine.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katheryn Thompson

    Makes for a very interesting first read-through, and an ideal one to keep and use as a reference book when needed (especially when it has such a beautiful front cover).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rodion

    The best thing about this book is that it's short. The best thing about this book is that it's short.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    An excellent and relatively unpretentious primer on the basics of wine. Also read it in a couple of hours so she is fully correct with the title.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Summer Reading Challenge 6/27 Short & Sweet - “Read a book that is less than 100 pages (or a book you can finish in one sitting)” The 24-Hour Wine Expert clocks in at a whopping 111 pages, and I was able to finish it in one sitting. This book packs a lot of information into those few pages. While I definitely took some useful tidbits, the information was way too surface-level to leave any reader an “expert”. No book should feature more than one glossary… eye-wateringly long lists of word definitions Summer Reading Challenge 6/27 Short & Sweet - “Read a book that is less than 100 pages (or a book you can finish in one sitting)” The 24-Hour Wine Expert clocks in at a whopping 111 pages, and I was able to finish it in one sitting. This book packs a lot of information into those few pages. While I definitely took some useful tidbits, the information was way too surface-level to leave any reader an “expert”. No book should feature more than one glossary… eye-wateringly long lists of word definitions. Something I might refer back to in the future - but an absolutely ineffective way to learn information in one sitting. Overall, I took away enough useful tidbits that I will use, but still this quick read has ended up on my dreaded 2*-and-less book graveyard.

  10. 4 out of 5

    sevdah

    This is the third book on wine I've read if I remember correctly and at this point I probably need something stronger than a short introduction on the topic. But anyway; Reason I picked it up: Robinson compares wine shops to bookshops. Irresistible image. She's amusing and knowledgeable, the book's a treat. (Why don't we have something like it on coffee or tea? We need something like it on coffee or tea.) This is the third book on wine I've read if I remember correctly and at this point I probably need something stronger than a short introduction on the topic. But anyway; Reason I picked it up: Robinson compares wine shops to bookshops. Irresistible image. She's amusing and knowledgeable, the book's a treat. (Why don't we have something like it on coffee or tea? We need something like it on coffee or tea.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Informative, interesting. I most liked the tasting exercises and will be completing those. I actually wish there was more of that and less on the wine regions.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Niamh

    Wonderfully unpretentious and informative

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bill Marsano

    By Bill Marsano, from a pre-publication copy. I’ve been writing about wine and spirits for about three decades, and one of the amusing parts of the job is reading the ‘become an expert overnight’ articles published by the ‘slicks’’—the major monthly national magazines that are printed on shiny paper. They’re invariably full of misinformation and outright errors, and they’re usually written but people who know very little who deal with editors who know even less. So I approached this book dry-was By Bill Marsano, from a pre-publication copy. I’ve been writing about wine and spirits for about three decades, and one of the amusing parts of the job is reading the ‘become an expert overnight’ articles published by the ‘slicks’’—the major monthly national magazines that are printed on shiny paper. They’re invariably full of misinformation and outright errors, and they’re usually written but people who know very little who deal with editors who know even less. So I approached this book dry-washing my hands in anticipation of a rich selection of gaffes, boners, clangers, bricks and other stumbles. Then I noticed the author’s name: Jancis Robinson. She is, among many other things, the editor of the encyclopedic Oxford Companion to Wine, an excellent writer and critic, and a no-nonsense person all around (she was I think the first major critic to welcome the increased use of screw-caps for wine). It has been said the she knows more about wine than God. That is an exaggeration, but I have it on good authority the He always takes her advice on pairings. So . . . what you have here is a certified expert giving you the straight talk. And she does so in a brisk 100 or so pages. SMALL pages, too. If that has you thinking that wine isn’t such a difficult subject after all, you would be correct. Robinson gives you what you need to get started, and after that almost everything is a matter of your personal taste and keeping at a distance—a GREAT distance—the wine snobs who will spoil your pleasure and wine geeks who will make it incomprehensibly complicated. How to shop for wine, how to serve it, that major grapes it’s made of, pricing, stemware, myths and tips—it’s all here, and more, and it’s all readily understandable and of practical use. Now what about the 24-Hour part? It’s true enough if you have the necessary discipline. It works like this: Read the book; when you get to the end, turn it over and read it again; repeat often. Soon you’ll be surprised by how much you remember. Eventually you’ll remember all of it, and it probably won’t take the whole 24 hours (you can keep a log if you want to. Why not?). What’s the secret to this efficient, practical, snobbery free approach? It’s this: Robinson wants you to enjoy wine. Too many other writers mostly want to impress and/or frighten you. So buy this book and a corkscrew—Amazon has tons of them. PullTap is an excellent brand.—Bill Marsano was the longtime Wine and Spirits Editor of United Airlines’ Hemispheres magazine and is a fitful blogger at pouredwithpleasure.com.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lea

    From tasting terms to wine and food pairings, to grape names and wine regions, this book is a good starting point if you're interested in wine. I like how the author includes suggested exercises to better understand the concepts she writes about (i.e. try lemon juice and cold tea to understand what acidity and tannin taste / feel like). I also appreciated how the author notes a couple times that we all taste and experience wines differently which I think is important to recognize. It's easy to g From tasting terms to wine and food pairings, to grape names and wine regions, this book is a good starting point if you're interested in wine. I like how the author includes suggested exercises to better understand the concepts she writes about (i.e. try lemon juice and cold tea to understand what acidity and tannin taste / feel like). I also appreciated how the author notes a couple times that we all taste and experience wines differently which I think is important to recognize. It's easy to get discouraged if you don't taste the 'hint of oak' or 'earthiness' of whatever everyone else at the table is talking about. After reading the book I certainly don't feel like an expert! Which makes sense as the world of wine is vast and seems a little bit complicated. It more so provided a jumping off point for what else to research.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shania P

    Fun and easy read. Compact with more than the basics. If you love wine and you want to learn a little more about this sophisticated drink, Jancis has made it possible. The book is inexpensive and pocket size. Buy it, read it and try all the suggested taste test!!! You won't be disappointed I promise. I even bought a set of standard riedel glasses with long stems just to try out new wines. Keep all experimenting playful and don't break the bank. Cause according to Jancis expensive bottles aren't Fun and easy read. Compact with more than the basics. If you love wine and you want to learn a little more about this sophisticated drink, Jancis has made it possible. The book is inexpensive and pocket size. Buy it, read it and try all the suggested taste test!!! You won't be disappointed I promise. I even bought a set of standard riedel glasses with long stems just to try out new wines. Keep all experimenting playful and don't break the bank. Cause according to Jancis expensive bottles aren't always good. I stuck to the 10-30$ range. And I've found some really interesting steely flavors. Enjoy!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Jancis is a wine goddess, and you can't go wrong if you pick up any of her books or watch her videos about wine. She's funny, accessible, and informative, and you'll take plenty away from any encounter. This is a good starter book if you know very little about wine, but if you're already on your way to oenophilia, move right into her excellent and much more robust Oxford Companion to Wine, so you have a rich resource to dip into when you need it. As a note, I would recommend the physical version Jancis is a wine goddess, and you can't go wrong if you pick up any of her books or watch her videos about wine. She's funny, accessible, and informative, and you'll take plenty away from any encounter. This is a good starter book if you know very little about wine, but if you're already on your way to oenophilia, move right into her excellent and much more robust Oxford Companion to Wine, so you have a rich resource to dip into when you need it. As a note, I would recommend the physical version over Kindle, so you can more easily use it as a reference tool.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    A handy reference guide to some of the key concepts for wine appreciation. I could no means memorise it all to become an expert in 24-hours, but will surely consult it again and again over the years when tasting wines. It's delightfully brief, written in a to-the-point and friendly style, not overly pretentious. A downside for me as an Australian is that it doesn't have a huge amount of content on the kinds of wine that are most common here (I'm looking forward to Grace De Morgan's 'Everything H A handy reference guide to some of the key concepts for wine appreciation. I could no means memorise it all to become an expert in 24-hours, but will surely consult it again and again over the years when tasting wines. It's delightfully brief, written in a to-the-point and friendly style, not overly pretentious. A downside for me as an Australian is that it doesn't have a huge amount of content on the kinds of wine that are most common here (I'm looking forward to Grace De Morgan's 'Everything Happens for a Riesling' for that reason).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    This is a fantastic and concise book on wine. If you're a wine lover and want to learn more about this fascinating subject, I highly recommend reading this little book. It'll provide you with the basic essentials of debunking wine myths, pairing food and wine, the tasting ritual, the ten most planted grape varieties, important wine regions of the world and much more. So, pour yourself a nice varietal, curl up with this little book and enjoy! This is a fantastic and concise book on wine. If you're a wine lover and want to learn more about this fascinating subject, I highly recommend reading this little book. It'll provide you with the basic essentials of debunking wine myths, pairing food and wine, the tasting ritual, the ten most planted grape varieties, important wine regions of the world and much more. So, pour yourself a nice varietal, curl up with this little book and enjoy!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Philipp Hartmann

    This book offers a very, very basic overview over the wine world. Even though it does contain some useful information - particularly for newbies without any prior knowledge about wine - it falls short of providing "expert knowledge", as the title suggests. There are far more informative and engaging books for wine amateurs out there - and the suggestive title sounds rather presumptuous considering the somewhat superficial information the book acutally contains. Average at best. This book offers a very, very basic overview over the wine world. Even though it does contain some useful information - particularly for newbies without any prior knowledge about wine - it falls short of providing "expert knowledge", as the title suggests. There are far more informative and engaging books for wine amateurs out there - and the suggestive title sounds rather presumptuous considering the somewhat superficial information the book acutally contains. Average at best.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Noel

    24-Hour Wine Expert was a great read! Small in size and easy to understand, I found the information to be fantastic. Would make a great gift to anyone who enjoys wine or wants to get to know it better. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... https://www.goodreads.com/author/show... 24-Hour Wine Expert was a great read! Small in size and easy to understand, I found the information to be fantastic. Would make a great gift to anyone who enjoys wine or wants to get to know it better. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... https://www.goodreads.com/author/show...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    Maybe I am not the audience for this book, which I found to overlook the magic of wine and reduce it to lists and definitions. Not even fun to read--which wine writing, at the very least, should be. And, because the reader doesn't savor the writing, the information flies by in a blur--nothing here that can't be gotten from a quick Google search. Maybe I am not the audience for this book, which I found to overlook the magic of wine and reduce it to lists and definitions. Not even fun to read--which wine writing, at the very least, should be. And, because the reader doesn't savor the writing, the information flies by in a blur--nothing here that can't be gotten from a quick Google search.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rizello

    I just discovered her, having no idea about her history and influence in the wine world. I have watched a few interviews with her and she is not pretentious about her massive knowledge, but instead is friendly and approachable. This book is intended to be a pocket guide for newbies, so it fits nicely in that role.

  23. 4 out of 5

    C.E. Case

    Easy and accessible, if a bit thin. For consumption rather than study. I did read it in less than 24 hours. No short-cuts offered--to learn about specific wines, the advice is to Google them. To learn about "wine" as a thing, this book is good. Easy and accessible, if a bit thin. For consumption rather than study. I did read it in less than 24 hours. No short-cuts offered--to learn about specific wines, the advice is to Google them. To learn about "wine" as a thing, this book is good.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Muath Aziz

    Lovely simple introduction to the most pretentious science of human history. This book (mostly) gives you information rather than opinions, yet without losing the opinion flavor. Don't worry, it's not that scientific, it's artistic. Lovely simple introduction to the most pretentious science of human history. This book (mostly) gives you information rather than opinions, yet without losing the opinion flavor. Don't worry, it's not that scientific, it's artistic.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Barnett

    Confidence in 24 hours After reading this book I’ll feel a lot more confident in buying wine. This book helps build a framework for understanding wine basics and what exactly you’re looking at in a wine shop.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katie Olson

    While this book is very short, it is heavily packed with more wine information than any non expert would every need to know. It’s written in a way the explains each piece of information about wine as a whole and specific wines, but is written in a dry manner.

  27. 4 out of 5

    James McNiff

    It was great to find some writing that contradicts some of the myths I’ve heard in the past: “you must drink red wine with meat, white with fish” or “the better the bottle the better the wine”. The list of tasting terms is helpful too.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    For such a slim book, it covers quite a lot of ground. it's all introductory, but I feel like it gives the lay of the land. One walks away with enough knowledge to at least experiment without just randomly throwing money at bottles. For such a slim book, it covers quite a lot of ground. it's all introductory, but I feel like it gives the lay of the land. One walks away with enough knowledge to at least experiment without just randomly throwing money at bottles.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maria Ch

    Good book to read if you want information on French, Italian and Spanish wine. If you want to know more about wine in other regions this won't be of much help. Good book to read if you want information on French, Italian and Spanish wine. If you want to know more about wine in other regions this won't be of much help.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Artie White

    Great book for people who are beginning to learn more about wine. A bit simple for anyone who already know the basics.

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