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The Demon, Vol 1: Hell's Hitman

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The violent and funny adventures of The Demon written by PREACHER co-creator Garth Ennis are collected for the first time. In these fast-paced, dark tales, the rhyming entity known as Etrigan the Demon, battles the Gothodaemon, the demon of Gotham City, with the help of Hitman. Then, a company of German soldiers from World War II are resurrected to capture an army base - a The violent and funny adventures of The Demon written by PREACHER co-creator Garth Ennis are collected for the first time. In these fast-paced, dark tales, the rhyming entity known as Etrigan the Demon, battles the Gothodaemon, the demon of Gotham City, with the help of Hitman. Then, a company of German soldiers from World War II are resurrected to capture an army base - and it's up to the Demon and the crew of the Haunted Tank to send them back to their graves.


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The violent and funny adventures of The Demon written by PREACHER co-creator Garth Ennis are collected for the first time. In these fast-paced, dark tales, the rhyming entity known as Etrigan the Demon, battles the Gothodaemon, the demon of Gotham City, with the help of Hitman. Then, a company of German soldiers from World War II are resurrected to capture an army base - a The violent and funny adventures of The Demon written by PREACHER co-creator Garth Ennis are collected for the first time. In these fast-paced, dark tales, the rhyming entity known as Etrigan the Demon, battles the Gothodaemon, the demon of Gotham City, with the help of Hitman. Then, a company of German soldiers from World War II are resurrected to capture an army base - and it's up to the Demon and the crew of the Haunted Tank to send them back to their graves.

30 review for The Demon, Vol 1: Hell's Hitman

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Since Etrigan is forced to rhyme, I will follow his lead, And write this review as poetry, I hope it helps if you're in need. The Demon is a favourite, a character I adore, So when this collection was released, I hoped it would not bore. And thankfully it's excellent, no need to complain, Since Garth Ennis is renowned for OTT violence and pain. We join the Demon and Jason Blood first in the origin of Hitman, A character Ennis launched first here, then took alone to to the stands. Poor Hitman finds himse Since Etrigan is forced to rhyme, I will follow his lead, And write this review as poetry, I hope it helps if you're in need. The Demon is a favourite, a character I adore, So when this collection was released, I hoped it would not bore. And thankfully it's excellent, no need to complain, Since Garth Ennis is renowned for OTT violence and pain. We join the Demon and Jason Blood first in the origin of Hitman, A character Ennis launched first here, then took alone to to the stands. Poor Hitman finds himself involved in Etrigan's new line of work; He's become Hell's Hitman, and his first target is a jerk. It's Asteroth, a Lord of Hell, who wants to raise a demon, The demon that thrives on Gotham's rage, so of course, it's quite a mean one. After this, there's one more arc, a clever three-part story, That joins the Demon with the Haunted Tank, this one's called Haunted Glory. All through these antics poor Jason Blood must suffer at the hands, Of the Demon himself, who hates his guts, that villain Etrigan, Poor Jason gets the shortest straw, his life falls apart around him, His friend's a cushion, his girl's now pregnant, it's really quite astounding. Joining Ennis is McCrea, his partner in this book, Who never skimps out on the art, which has a unique look. The Demon isn't for everyone, as Ennis isn't either, But I for one am glad he's here, this book is a crowd-pleaser! (God, that was harder than I thought. Long story short, this is great fun, so go buy it and enjoy!)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Back when DC had the best universe in comics, before they systematically wrecked everything that made it so great, its corners had room for oddball books like this (not to mention its spin-off Hitman). The Demon was the perfect star for a nineties comic, because he combines the two archetypal nineties protagonists in one: as Etrigan, he's a bulging-muscled, clawed psychopath; meanwhile, his unwillingly soul-bound immortal human alter ego, Jason Blood, is a trenchcoated supernatural moper. And wh Back when DC had the best universe in comics, before they systematically wrecked everything that made it so great, its corners had room for oddball books like this (not to mention its spin-off Hitman). The Demon was the perfect star for a nineties comic, because he combines the two archetypal nineties protagonists in one: as Etrigan, he's a bulging-muscled, clawed psychopath; meanwhile, his unwillingly soul-bound immortal human alter ego, Jason Blood, is a trenchcoated supernatural moper. And while some other iterations of the character see that combination become unutterably grim and moody, here it was Garth Ennis and John McCrea at the helm, and what those two do, for the most part, is take the piss. Ennis in particular takes to Etrigan's obligation to speak in rhyme like a good'un, pilfering from the finest traditions of comic verse, the more scurrilous the better (in particular, being very obvious about setting up a closing word he's not allowed to use, then having the line diverted or interrupted). And McCrea does grand guignol grotesquerie and comic smut like a teenage metal fan, except that underneath it all he is a genuinely competent artist who can rein it in when the story (very occasionally) demands subtlety. This long-overdue collection takes a little while to get started, not least because the boys took over a series already underway, and had to rearrange its status quo as they went. So Blood has a girlfriend, a best friend who's been turned into a cushion (with a somewhat 'Love & Monsters' romantic subplot) and so forth to juggle. There's also a slight overreliance on demons called things like Rectomm, Kakk and Smegma for laughs. But even while you can sense the engine warming up, hitman Tommy Monaghan is introduced and then transfigured, before we move on to an ambitious story which combines some entertaining if obvious jabs at televangelists with a haunting idea about the demon-souls of cities (guess what Gotham's looks like?). And then...'Haunted Glory'. In which Etrigan teams up with the Haunted Tank against undead Nazis. This could easily have been a complete clusterfuck, especially given Ennis' surprising failure to address the racist elephant in the room - why did a Confederate general's ghost ever assist United States forces against the Nazis when he'd presumably have been much happier aiding the self-proclaimed ubermensch against the Yankees? And yet, it works. It really works. Somehow, it yokes the simple war movie pleasures of blowing up those who richly deserve it with a genuinely moving tribute to the old men who did the real thing.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Garth Ennis and John McCrea's anarchic, vulgar take on Jack Kirby's non-anarchic, non-vulgar Etrigan the Demon is a hoot for those with a strong stomach. It's no more faithful to Kirby's original conception of a demon who fights on the side of the angels than, well, pretty much every other take on The Demon after Kirby's. Indeed, the only comic book that ever came close to Kirby's energetic mix of super-heroism and the supernatural is Mike Mignola's Hellboy. Ennis and McCrea, like Alan Moore and Garth Ennis and John McCrea's anarchic, vulgar take on Jack Kirby's non-anarchic, non-vulgar Etrigan the Demon is a hoot for those with a strong stomach. It's no more faithful to Kirby's original conception of a demon who fights on the side of the angels than, well, pretty much every other take on The Demon after Kirby's. Indeed, the only comic book that ever came close to Kirby's energetic mix of super-heroism and the supernatural is Mike Mignola's Hellboy. Ennis and McCrea, like Alan Moore and Matt Wagner before them, make Etrigan a barely controlled monster. They make the human Etrigan shares a body with, Jason Blood, into a whiny incompetent. They make the various supporting characters into buffoons and punchlines. So it goes. It all works because Ennis and McCrea are really good at ultraviolent horror comedy. It also works because they introduce their super-powered hitman character (cleverly dubbed Hitman) in the course of these issues. Hitman would get his own series. As is pretty much always the case with Ennis, he'd seem a lot more comfortable and a lot less scabrous writing his own character. The standout story arc here sees Ennis and McCrea bring back DC's venerable weird war series The Haunted Tank. The cognitive dissonance generated by a story of an American tank haunted by a Confederate general taking on a bunch of resurrected, supernatural Nazis with the help of a nihilistic Demon is a wee bit mind-blowing. Perhaps never moreso than in a scene in which the Demon explains to the Nazis why he finds them repugnant. It's crazy fun, and it allows Ennis to himself resurrect some of the ridiculous maneuvers the dinky little Haunted Tank once performed so as to defeat seemingly endless hordes of vastly superior Nazi machinery. Is this Kirbyesque? No. And Ennis' decision to have Etrigan speak in rhymes all the time -- based on a long-standing, DC-wide misreading of Kirby's original Etrigan , who only occasionally spoke in rhyme -- can make for some truly godawful writing at points. But, you know, Nazi zombies in tanks!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    Slightly amusing, but mostly forgettable. The majority of this volume is mindless stupidity, and while I understand that’s sometimes needed, it doesn’t translate to good or even fun stories. Most of the time anyway. The last four issues are easily the best here, with Ennis bringing back the Haunted Tank for a war story (you know Ennis writing war is usually excellent) and a standalone with a unique perspective on Etrigan and Jason Blood. Like I said, this book has its charm and definitely was un Slightly amusing, but mostly forgettable. The majority of this volume is mindless stupidity, and while I understand that’s sometimes needed, it doesn’t translate to good or even fun stories. Most of the time anyway. The last four issues are easily the best here, with Ennis bringing back the Haunted Tank for a war story (you know Ennis writing war is usually excellent) and a standalone with a unique perspective on Etrigan and Jason Blood. Like I said, this book has its charm and definitely was unlike most mainstream comics at the time. We also see the beginnings of one Tommy Monaghan, Hitman. But there’s a reason no one mentions this as their favorite Ennis comic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Luana

    Extremely juvenile in a boogers n farts kinda way, but fun adventure times nonetheless. Kinda wild how much stuff Ennis inherits from whoever did the previous run? Jason Blood has... two talking pillows? A girlfriend? A guy called Randu? OK sure whatevs! But then he also fights Panzer zombie nazis and the Demon of Gotham (no points for guessing what shape that one takes). Tommy Monaghan is introduced here and him and Sean are kinda dicks? You can tell Ennis was in way bigger cartoon mode here tha Extremely juvenile in a boogers n farts kinda way, but fun adventure times nonetheless. Kinda wild how much stuff Ennis inherits from whoever did the previous run? Jason Blood has... two talking pillows? A girlfriend? A guy called Randu? OK sure whatevs! But then he also fights Panzer zombie nazis and the Demon of Gotham (no points for guessing what shape that one takes). Tommy Monaghan is introduced here and him and Sean are kinda dicks? You can tell Ennis was in way bigger cartoon mode here than he was in Hitman. also LOL at the idea of a Confederate general being against nazis

  6. 5 out of 5

    John Shaw

    I had forgotten that Ennis had written The Demon once upon a time. This book popped up as a recommendation on Amazon. I gave it a shot due to my love of the body of Garth Ennis' work. Totally depraved and it was amazing. Ennis pushes the boundaries of both good taste and what could be published in a mainstream DC comic. The Demon is Etrigan imprisoned in the flesh of Jason Blood by Merlin almost 2,000 years ago. Collected here are the first issues after Ennis took over the reigns. Switching gears very heav I had forgotten that Ennis had written The Demon once upon a time. This book popped up as a recommendation on Amazon. I gave it a shot due to my love of the body of Garth Ennis' work. Totally depraved and it was amazing. Ennis pushes the boundaries of both good taste and what could be published in a mainstream DC comic. The Demon is Etrigan imprisoned in the flesh of Jason Blood by Merlin almost 2,000 years ago. Collected here are the first issues after Ennis took over the reigns. Switching gears very heavily Ennis focuses on the "demon from Hell" aspect of the character, which leads to some incredible, bizarre, disturbing yet brilliant stories. The highlight of this collection is the origin story of one of the most unusual DC Comics characters. The Hitman who is, a hitman. Following his beginning in the pages of The Demon Ennis & McRea had a long run on a series following the exploits of a Gotham City hitman. It was a incredible. But that's another blog. Ennis also resurrects The Haunted Tank That's right. DC ran a comic that featured the Ghost of Confederate General J. E. B. Stuart watching over an American tank in the Second World War. I'll just let you skull on that for a minute. Brought back here to help Etrigan fight zombie Nazis. This book was so much fun. I hated to see it end. I actually read it all in one sitting. Now I'm off to get some old Hitman trades.

  7. 4 out of 5

    47Time

    Even the names are funny in Garth's writings. The story and artwork are messy, but I believe by design, not because of lack of skill. Both the artist and writer improve as the issues go by. The two one-shots are followed by two longer stories that pose a serious challenge to Etrigan. Everything is over the top here, so don't expect mature storytelling from a world where the main character speaks in rhyme. After Etrigan hunts down a demon who possessed a satanist biker with a funny name, we jump i Even the names are funny in Garth's writings. The story and artwork are messy, but I believe by design, not because of lack of skill. Both the artist and writer improve as the issues go by. The two one-shots are followed by two longer stories that pose a serious challenge to Etrigan. Everything is over the top here, so don't expect mature storytelling from a world where the main character speaks in rhyme. After Etrigan hunts down a demon who possessed a satanist biker with a funny name, we jump into the middle ages where Jason Blood realises that he is being possessed by Etrigan and begins looking for a solution to rid himself of the demon. Facing his next target, Lord Asteroth, is more challenging when Etrigan is surrounded by the Choirboy Commandoes. The fallen angels Duma and Remial offer Etrigan help if he agrees to become hell's hitman. Jason's hope to redeem himself seems lost. (view spoiler)[Etrigan hires Tommy the hitman to help. Asteroth creates the giant Gothodaemon that increases the homicidal tendencies of everyone in the city. Etrigan deals the creature a mighty blow and then takes pleasure in torturing Asteroth the whole night long. (hide spoiler)] The last part is a story with WW2 references. The Nazi General von Raddel plans to put his flunky Bergen as fuhrer. He wants the resurrected SS Panzerarmee Hell to occupy the US, then the rest of the world. They have to deal with a team of tankies driving the Haunted Tank first. This one is a bucket of laughs throughout, but still manages to show due respect for the men who fought the good fight.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shane Perry

    Never read any Etrigan books before, but I trusted the name of Garth Ennis when picking this up. Oh man...what a ride. Ennis has a lot of fun with Etrigan and takes to his world so well. The world of the Devil’s Hitman is a ripe playground to use and Ennis rounds up as many toys as he can. The struggle between Etrigan and Jason Blood is interesting, but I found myself more entertained by Etrigan’s shenanigans. This book has so much more humor than I would have initially thought. John McCrea draw Never read any Etrigan books before, but I trusted the name of Garth Ennis when picking this up. Oh man...what a ride. Ennis has a lot of fun with Etrigan and takes to his world so well. The world of the Devil’s Hitman is a ripe playground to use and Ennis rounds up as many toys as he can. The struggle between Etrigan and Jason Blood is interesting, but I found myself more entertained by Etrigan’s shenanigans. This book has so much more humor than I would have initially thought. John McCrea draws the Demon so well and makes Gotham look somehow more gothic and foreboding than usual. Did you know the DC Universe has a separate Hell for Nazis? Can’t wait to read the second volume.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ramon

    Nice to finally get to read these Demon issues of Ennis, as only scattered issues would make their way to my comic store as a kid. There are fewer than I remember, and this first volume already has Hitman in it, though I enjoyed the second tale with Haunted Tank a bit more. This was a nice vehicle for McCrea's cartoony, warped brand of violence/comedy. They really did make a good fit together, as cemented on their Hitman run. Also fun to see Ennis tying it in to Gaiman's Sandman with the angels Nice to finally get to read these Demon issues of Ennis, as only scattered issues would make their way to my comic store as a kid. There are fewer than I remember, and this first volume already has Hitman in it, though I enjoyed the second tale with Haunted Tank a bit more. This was a nice vehicle for McCrea's cartoony, warped brand of violence/comedy. They really did make a good fit together, as cemented on their Hitman run. Also fun to see Ennis tying it in to Gaiman's Sandman with the angels who now preside over Hell in Lucifer's absence.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Williams

    A classic Ennis McCrea book. Not as unfettered as the duo could be, but far beyond its contemporary DC fare. Demon rhyming is always a bit hard to get through, but that disgusting Ennis charm still manages to shine through. McCrea's art, as aways, is fantastic and wonderously depraved. Plus, we all need a story in which Nazis get eviscerated by a demon and haunted tank piloted by pensioners. Also: Hitman is here, guys! It's fun, it's tacky, and boyohboy is it a fun way to waste some time. A classic Ennis McCrea book. Not as unfettered as the duo could be, but far beyond its contemporary DC fare. Demon rhyming is always a bit hard to get through, but that disgusting Ennis charm still manages to shine through. McCrea's art, as aways, is fantastic and wonderously depraved. Plus, we all need a story in which Nazis get eviscerated by a demon and haunted tank piloted by pensioners. Also: Hitman is here, guys! It's fun, it's tacky, and boyohboy is it a fun way to waste some time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    via NYPL - Nice to see some early Tommy Monaghan tales. The rest, eh... it's okay - nothing to be embarrassed by if you want to read it, but nothing you're missing out on either. McCrea's artwork is wonderful. The humor (Etrigan smacking people with the corpse of a mob boss!) is fun. Reading Etrigan's dialogue becomes a real chore much too quickly though. via NYPL - Nice to see some early Tommy Monaghan tales. The rest, eh... it's okay - nothing to be embarrassed by if you want to read it, but nothing you're missing out on either. McCrea's artwork is wonderful. The humor (Etrigan smacking people with the corpse of a mob boss!) is fun. Reading Etrigan's dialogue becomes a real chore much too quickly though.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Phil Lewis

    I enjoyed this, looking forward to volume 2.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    This is good stuff. It’s fun seeing Garth Ennis write Etrigan from this era and introduce the criminally underrated character Hitman.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Artur Coelho

    Etrigan é um caso de dupla personalidade mergulhada no ocultismo psicadélico de Jack Kirby. Etrigan é um poderoso demónio acorrentado à alma humana do feiticeiro Jason Blood. Odeiam-se, mas são forçados a coexistir ao longo de milénios, sob efeito de uma maldição da qual não se conseguem livrar. Comic de terror ocultista da Golden Age, Etrigan/Blood foi redescoberto pela lendária época de Alan Moore em Swamp Thing. O trágico e amoral demónio rimador ganhou protagonismo, e desde aí tem sido perso Etrigan é um caso de dupla personalidade mergulhada no ocultismo psicadélico de Jack Kirby. Etrigan é um poderoso demónio acorrentado à alma humana do feiticeiro Jason Blood. Odeiam-se, mas são forçados a coexistir ao longo de milénios, sob efeito de uma maldição da qual não se conseguem livrar. Comic de terror ocultista da Golden Age, Etrigan/Blood foi redescoberto pela lendária época de Alan Moore em Swamp Thing. O trágico e amoral demónio rimador ganhou protagonismo, e desde aí tem sido personagem secundária recorrente, com algumas séries próprias de curta duração. A sua última aparição foi como parte da tentativa da DC de dar um cunho de fantasia medievalista aos seus heróis com a série Demon Knights. Há vantagens em ser uma personagem de segunda linha. Liberta argumentistas e ilustradores do peso do histórico do personagem e das expectativas dos fãs. Notem que Daredevil só se tornou interessante quando Frank Miller pegou num comic que já ninguém lia e lhe deu um toque policial noir, que acabou por ditar o tom da série. Se bem que não tenha sido este o caminho seguido por Garth Ennis nesta sua época como argumentista de Etrigan, coligida neste TPB. Ennis trouxe um humor ácido e violento à personagem, num registo over the top de violência ridícula cheio de piadas mórbidas. Quer a eliminar demónios que controlam o mundo do crime em Gotham com extremo prejuízo e preferência por usar as mãos como arma, quer a combater zombies nazis que invadem a américa com ajuda de The Haunted Tank, o resultado é histriónico, roçando o absurdo, e por isso muito interessante. O traço grotesco de John McCrea, comparsa de Ennis nas suas aventuras mais radicais, consegue momentos de absurdismo perfeccionista, embora nem sempre consiga acompanhar a iconografia latente nos argumentos. Funciona perfeitamente em registo caricatural, falhando quando a narrativa pede algo mais ambiental. Da leitura fica a sensação que alguém na DC foi corajoso ou muito inocente, para permitir a publicação desta insanidade gráfica.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Overall, I was vastly underwhelmed by Ennis' Demon. It's mindless mayhem that rarely goes beyond the idea that Demon is killing bad demons on earth. There's little humor, little continuing plot, and really little anything other than Demon killing stuff. In other words, Ennis shows off his bad qualities without anything to really redeem the book. Shorts (40, Annual). Ennis' try-out issue is a pretty dull story of an escaped demon [5/10], while the Annual is part of the hideous Bloodlines crossover Overall, I was vastly underwhelmed by Ennis' Demon. It's mindless mayhem that rarely goes beyond the idea that Demon is killing bad demons on earth. There's little humor, little continuing plot, and really little anything other than Demon killing stuff. In other words, Ennis shows off his bad qualities without anything to really redeem the book. Shorts (40, Annual). Ennis' try-out issue is a pretty dull story of an escaped demon [5/10], while the Annual is part of the hideous Bloodlines crossovers, that's interesting only because it introduces Tommy Monaghan ... and it actually feels more like Hitman Annual #1 than Demon Annual #2 [6/10]. Neither story really tells us what Ennis is going to do when he has his feet under him ... Hell's Hitman (42-45). A somewhat awkward reintegration of the continuing Demon plots, after Ennis ignored them in his into and Annual. The fight against Asteroth isn't that thrilling other than the inclusion of Tommy (making him one of the very few successful Bloodlines characters). The interaction with Gaiman's Hell mythology is also amusing, as we see Duma bring the Demon on as a Hitman. But otherwise, this arc is just amusing, little more [5/10]. Haunted Glory (46-48). I'm surprised that Ennis call this his favorite Demon story because it's not all that. Sure, the idea of returning to the Haunted Tank and his crew 50 years later is brilliant, and Ennis has some really nice prose about the waiting tank ... but beyond that it's two+ issues of constant, meaningless fights that get really old really fast [4/10]. From Hell (49). The best story in the volume. It's got an unusual point of view, a better focus on Jason, more humor, and a fun twist. The end is a little too expected, but otherwise this is what Ennis' Demon should have been [7/10].

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Palmieri

    This book is insane. As Ennis wrote in the intro, he had no interest in writing a superhero story, so what did he do instead? He wrote a story about literal demons from Hell with how-did-this-get-published names, working alongside WWII vets who pilot a tank haunted by the ghost of a Confederate general so they can fight an army of Nazi zombies. Bodies are flying everywhere, occult symbols litter the pages, and yet it's... actually a great time! This sort of book isn't usually my thing, but I genu This book is insane. As Ennis wrote in the intro, he had no interest in writing a superhero story, so what did he do instead? He wrote a story about literal demons from Hell with how-did-this-get-published names, working alongside WWII vets who pilot a tank haunted by the ghost of a Confederate general so they can fight an army of Nazi zombies. Bodies are flying everywhere, occult symbols litter the pages, and yet it's... actually a great time! This sort of book isn't usually my thing, but I genuinely loved it. Ennis struck just the right balance of obscene and fun. I was most interested in seeing how this compares to his later works, given that this was only his second American comics work. The ultraviolence, crude humor, occult, war themes, gray morality, religious satire- it's all here, if not as refined as it would later become. McCrea is great here, too, giving the seriousness a bit of levity with his cartoonish designs and use of body language. I started reading this for the early appearances of Hitman, but I kept reading beyond those issues because I enjoyed it so much. Definitely going to start on volume 2 soon.

  17. 4 out of 5

    B

    This was pretty confusing. Etrigan is portrayed as a villain who destroys other villains for no real clear reason. (Clearing turf?) The rhymes are often confusing and not great. Jason Blood is kind of a sadsack with no real presence. Also two supporting characters are throw pillows. Then there's the detour where a Confederate general fights Nazis. I know it's a Jack Kirby bit, but in the 90's, it's a lot more disconcerting. This was pretty confusing. Etrigan is portrayed as a villain who destroys other villains for no real clear reason. (Clearing turf?) The rhymes are often confusing and not great. Jason Blood is kind of a sadsack with no real presence. Also two supporting characters are throw pillows. Then there's the detour where a Confederate general fights Nazis. I know it's a Jack Kirby bit, but in the 90's, it's a lot more disconcerting.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andres

    Hace 22 años me compré el The Demon 43, que ahora está aquí compilado y finalmente pude leer el final. Este es el Etrigan que me gusta. Notable que hayan decidido compilar el run de Garth Ennis y John McCrea.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Garcia

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ensley

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nick Kives

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael Gaddie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jason Mead

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nuno Oliveira

  27. 4 out of 5

    Channing

  28. 5 out of 5

    David

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chaynor Hsiao

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