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A new short story collection from Hugo Award-winning author Mary Robinette Kowal, with an introduction by Patrick Rothfuss. Table of Contents * "The Bound Man" * "Chrysalis" * "Rampion" * "At the Edge of Dying" * "Clockwork Chickadee" * "Body Language" * "Waiting for Rain" * "First Flight" * "Evil Robot Monkey" * "The Consciousness Problem" * "For Solo Cello, op. 12" * "For Want of a N A new short story collection from Hugo Award-winning author Mary Robinette Kowal, with an introduction by Patrick Rothfuss. Table of Contents * "The Bound Man" * "Chrysalis" * "Rampion" * "At the Edge of Dying" * "Clockwork Chickadee" * "Body Language" * "Waiting for Rain" * "First Flight" * "Evil Robot Monkey" * "The Consciousness Problem" * "For Solo Cello, op. 12" * "For Want of a Nail" * "The Shocking Affair of the Dutch steamship Friesland" * "Salt of the Earth" * "American Changeling" * "The White Phoenix Feather" * "We Interrupt This Broadcast" * "Rockets Red" (A brand new story in the Lady Astronaut universe) * "The Lady Astronaut of Mars"


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A new short story collection from Hugo Award-winning author Mary Robinette Kowal, with an introduction by Patrick Rothfuss. Table of Contents * "The Bound Man" * "Chrysalis" * "Rampion" * "At the Edge of Dying" * "Clockwork Chickadee" * "Body Language" * "Waiting for Rain" * "First Flight" * "Evil Robot Monkey" * "The Consciousness Problem" * "For Solo Cello, op. 12" * "For Want of a N A new short story collection from Hugo Award-winning author Mary Robinette Kowal, with an introduction by Patrick Rothfuss. Table of Contents * "The Bound Man" * "Chrysalis" * "Rampion" * "At the Edge of Dying" * "Clockwork Chickadee" * "Body Language" * "Waiting for Rain" * "First Flight" * "Evil Robot Monkey" * "The Consciousness Problem" * "For Solo Cello, op. 12" * "For Want of a Nail" * "The Shocking Affair of the Dutch steamship Friesland" * "Salt of the Earth" * "American Changeling" * "The White Phoenix Feather" * "We Interrupt This Broadcast" * "Rockets Red" (A brand new story in the Lady Astronaut universe) * "The Lady Astronaut of Mars"

30 review for Word Puppets

  1. 4 out of 5

    Olga Godim

    I received this short story collection through NetGalley I love this author’s novels and I couldn’t pass up her short story collection when I saw it on NetGalley. The intro says that the stories are arranged in chronological order, and it’s fascinating to read them in that order, to witness the author’s writing maturing from story to story. There are 19 stories in the collection, and not all of them were to my taste, but overall it was an impressive read. All the stories have at least one specula I received this short story collection through NetGalley I love this author’s novels and I couldn’t pass up her short story collection when I saw it on NetGalley. The intro says that the stories are arranged in chronological order, and it’s fascinating to read them in that order, to witness the author’s writing maturing from story to story. There are 19 stories in the collection, and not all of them were to my taste, but overall it was an impressive read. All the stories have at least one speculative fiction element. Most are somber or even downright sorrowful tales. Not a happy collection, but it will stay in my memory. The Bound Man – a fantasy story with trolls and elves and destiny scrolls, but I didn’t like that one. I think it is an earlier story. It’s derivative and underdeveloped. Chrysalis – a lovely sci-fi story. A documentary filmmaker on another planet plays a benevolent god with the alien lives. She plays Cupid. Nice. Rampion – fantasy, but not really a story, just the beginning of one. At the Edge of Dying – another fantasy, a bloody, brutal story of war, politics, and love. Powerful. Clockwork Chickadee – an evil, ruthless toy protagonist. It’s almost horror, something in the veins of E. T. A. Hoffmann. Body Language – a marvelous story about a puppeteer and an AI, somewhat between fantasy, sci-fi, and reality. Of course, a puppeteer herself, Kowal made this puppeteer one of her best characters. Waiting for Rain – a love story with wine. Poignant and sweet. First Flight – an original concept of time travel plus a hundred-year-old heroine. Delicious. Evil Robot Monkey – very short and very painful. Who has the right to decide if a creature is sentient or an animal? What are the criteria? The Consciousness Problem – a love story about clones and brain damage. Very sad. Actually, most stories in the collection have at least a tinge of sadness. There is not much optimism there. For Solo Cello, op. 12 – this was a horrible story. Not horribly written, no, but horribly powerful. It describes such a painful, impossible situation, I wanted to scream. There was no good way for the story to end, and it didn’t end well. The fantasy element was tiny but it enclosed the story, made it into what it is – a display of humans’ bottomless ability to hurt each other. For Want of a Nail – another sad story, a sci-fi about choices. Does dementia makes its sufferers subhuman? The Shocking Affair of the Dutch Steamship Friesland – a Sherlock Holmes story, also sad. Both choices the young heroine faces are extremely painful. There is no good choice available. Salt of the Earth – I was sorry I read this story. It is too tragic, too hopeless. Is murder ever justified? What about revenge? American Changeling – a charming tale of a teenage fairy in the modern world. The White Phoenix Feather: A Tale of Cuisine and Ninjas – this is a farce for gourmets, a burlesque with food. The last three stories are all sci-fi, all set in the same world of space travel, even though computer programmers still use punchcards – something no computer needed since the 1980s. We Interrupt This Broadcast – a dystopia. Programmers make terrific terrorists. Screen them, people! Make sure no programmer wants to take over the world, because they can. Rockets Red – an amusing anecdote about fireworks on Mars. The Lady Astronaut of Mars – a heartbreakingly sad story about aging. A note of complaint: My e-reader is a Kindle. This book was only available on NetGalley in one digital format, incompatible with Kindle. It took me several hours and a few downloads to finally create a file I could read, and the formatting didn’t survive the conversion process. It would’ve been nicer if the book was available on NetGalley in several digital formats, including the one for Kindle. The fact didn’t impact my opinion of the stories in any way but it created a vague feeling of dissatisfaction with the author. Why didn’t she offer a Kindle format? I’m not the only reviewer who reads with Kindle.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Wolf

    Talk about a fascinating author! Mary Robinette Kowal is the author of the Hugo-winning novel The Calculating Stars (one of my all-time faves) as well as other works. She's also a highly gifted audiobook narrator (narrating, among other books, the October Daye series and other works by Seanan McGuire). And on top of all that, she's a professional puppeteer! Yes, a puppeteer. So yeah, given her eclectic talents and interests, I'm not at all surprised that this collection of short stories is v Talk about a fascinating author! Mary Robinette Kowal is the author of the Hugo-winning novel The Calculating Stars (one of my all-time faves) as well as other works. She's also a highly gifted audiobook narrator (narrating, among other books, the October Daye series and other works by Seanan McGuire). And on top of all that, she's a professional puppeteer! Yes, a puppeteer. So yeah, given her eclectic talents and interests, I'm not at all surprised that this collection of short stories is varied, unusual, and very, very entertaining. Eighteen of the nineteen stories in Word Puppets were originally published elsewhere and featured in various anthologies and other publications, with one story (set in the Lady Astronaut world) original to this collection. The publication dates for the stories range between 2005 and 2015. Overall, I really enjoyed this collection (which is shocking for me, since I usually have an aversion to short stories). Of the stories included in Word Puppets, I strongly preferred the ones leaning more toward science fiction and speculative fiction rather than the stories I'd classify as fantasy. My particular favorites: Chrysalis: About an alien race for whom adulthood means the end of serious study, as they metamorphose from larvae to beautiful winged creatures, but leave their scholarship and ambitions in the past. Rampion: A short but powerful take on the Rapunzel story. Clockwork Chickadee: About some devious and tricky mechanical animals. Body Language: A really clever kidnapping/heist story, in which an expert puppeteer works with a gifted AI to save the day. (So awesome!) Waiting for Rain: A vineyard owner in India deals with family obligations and honor while trying to cope with the financial struggles of having to subscribe to controllable weather. First Flight: A 105-year-old woman is assigned a time travel task, and uses it to change history. Evil Robot Monkey: Very short, very good, very surprising. For Solo Cello, op 12: Wow, this one was great! About a concert cellist, an awful injury, and the even more awful way he might be able to heal. The White Phoenix Feather: Talk about adventures in dining! This is an action story about a woman who provides dangerous dining experiences to those who can pay. Full of flying dinner knives and hurled soup and flaming baguettes. Finally, the last three stories are all set within the world of The Calculating Stars: We Interrupt This Broadcast: This story offers a possible explanation for the events in The Calculating Stars, and it's frankly creepy. I'm choosing to interpret this story as an early version of events that the author eventually decided didn't work in the context of the larger series, because otherwise I find it too upsetting. Rockets Red: A fun interlude on Mars! The Lady Astronaut of Mars: The story that started it all! I read this story when it was first published on the Tor website in 2013, and absolutely loved it -- which is why I was thrilled to death when the author ended up expanding this world into the Lady Astronaut series. This story works as a stand-alone, set decades after the events of The Calculating Stars, and provides a different take on Elma and Nathaniel and the space program. (Fun note: This story was originally written as part of the audiobook collection Rip-off!, in which an assortment of sci-fi authors wrote new stories using the first lines of classic books as a starting point. The Lady Astronaut of Mars begins with the opening line of The Wizard of Oz: Dorothy lived in the midst of the great Kansas prairies, with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer, and Aunt Em, who was the farmer's wife .) All of the stories in Word Puppets are great, in my humble opinion! If you enjoy Mary Robinette Kowal's writing, or even if you've never read her before, give this collection a try. The stories all stand on their own, so if you're like me and are generally reluctant to commit to reading a book of short stories start to finish, Word Puppets is a nice choice to keep on your nightstand and dip in and out of whenever you feel like reading a story in 15 minutes or less!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marjolein

    Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com I've written down my thoughts as I was reading this short story collection. Now that I'm finished I'm looking back at a great collection of short stories. There wasn't really a story I hated, most were good to very good and some really stood out. I don't usually read collections of short stories, but this has been a very nice surprise. I was already planning on reading more books by Mary Robinette Kowal, but now I will definitely do so! Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com I've written down my thoughts as I was reading this short story collection. Now that I'm finished I'm looking back at a great collection of short stories. There wasn't really a story I hated, most were good to very good and some really stood out. I don't usually read collections of short stories, but this has been a very nice surprise. I was already planning on reading more books by Mary Robinette Kowal, but now I will definitely do so! ~The Bound Man~ 3.5 stars Very interesting story to start with. It gives a glimpse at a very interesting universe I would like to read more from. ~Chrysalis~ 4.5 stars I thought I liked The Bound Man, but I liked this one so much more! I liked the letters, the story and was surprised at how the short story captivated me! I've heard the stories are only getting better to the end... ~Rampion~ 3 stars Well, too short to really have an opinion about, but I didn't see that coming (might be I just don't know enough about fairy tales though). ~At the Edge of Dying~ 3 stars Interesting story, some very special concept are mentioned but at times it felt like a part was missing and that it should have been a longer story to really get it. ~Clockwork Chickadee~ 3.5 stars Presented in the form of a fable with clockwork animals, it was an interesting read and completely different from the other stories I've read so far. ~Body Language~ 3.5 stars It's almost a shame we don't get to see more of this sci fi world, with the AI and the puppets. I quite liked the story. ~Waiting for Rain~ 3.5 stars I'd never thought to say it but a very interesting story about wine, and love. ~First Flight~ 4 stars First reaction: Time Travel! I'm always in for a little bit of time travel. The restriction on it seems logical and it makes for a very unusual heroine. I want more of this! ~Evil Robot Monkey~ 4 stars I'd heard a lot of good things about this story, and it certainly was a good story, but it also was very, very short. Perhaps a bit too short for my taste. ~The Conciousness Problem~ 3 stars A short tale about a clone, and how are you even able to recognize the real person if they share all their experiences. Not the best story of the set, but still enjoyable and posing an interesting question. ~For Solo Cello, op. 12~ 3.5 stars Even though it was very short, just like the others, it managed to present a very sinister choice for a couple where the man, a cellist, just lost his arm and the woman finally is pregnant. ~For Want of A Nail~ 4.5 stars I really liked this short story. It poses an interesting question and fits in with all the books with sentient AIs that I've read lately. Also, it shows how some very stupid small things can get enormous consequences. ~The Shocking Affair of the Dutch Steamship Friesland~ 4 stars Sherlock Holmes! Watson! A short murder mystery with a young heroine who has a terrible choice to make. ~The Salt of the Earth~ 4 stars Although most of the stories in this collection are quite sad, this one certainly was really sad. It is also strange to imagine a world where salt is so scarce that they need to retrieve it from bodies. ~American Changeling~ 3 stars Mwah, I wasn't that impressed with this story about a young fairy who must save the Fairy Queen. It was a nice story, but compared to the others in this collection I felt it was less special. ~The White Phoenix Feather~ 3.5 stars This story is subtitled A Story of Cuisine and Ninjas. And yes, it is exactly as weird as one would expect. It is a farce on gastronomy, with a twist. The weirdest story in the collection so far. ~We Interrupt This Broadcast~ 3.5 stars Interesting story about the massive powers that lay with people we don't expect. ~Red Rockets~ 4 stars Very short story about fire works on Mars. Oh, and punch cards. ~The Lady Astronaut of Mars~ 4 stars Also a very sad story, like many in this collection. But a beautiful one. Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Trike

    This is a superb collection. According to publishers and authors, I am that rarest breed of readers, the kind who buys short story collections. I loves me some short story action. Even though many of these stories are available for free at Kowal's website (http://maryrobinettekowal.com/fiction...) and I had read a couple of them before, I still wanted to have this collection on my shelves. Both to support the author and to enjoy after the apocalypse. (Trump wants to use nukes everywhere and they This is a superb collection. According to publishers and authors, I am that rarest breed of readers, the kind who buys short story collections. I loves me some short story action. Even though many of these stories are available for free at Kowal's website (http://maryrobinettekowal.com/fiction...) and I had read a couple of them before, I still wanted to have this collection on my shelves. Both to support the author and to enjoy after the apocalypse. (Trump wants to use nukes everywhere and they just moved the doomsday clock to one minute from midnight. Stock up, kids.) The stories are arranged in more-or-less chronological order of writing from 2005 to 2015, and you can see Kowal improving as she goes, and doing so at a very rapid pace. But even the early ones are pretty good. There are a few typos and missing words here and there, but it's the sort of stuff spellcheck doesn't catch. "Than" instead of "that" and suchlike. No biggie. Let's break it down! The Bound Man - ★★★☆☆ Fantasy - This is a straightforward slice of epic fantasy concerning a prophecy and sword and whatnot. It wasn't subtle or twisty and really felt more like the opening chapter of a longer work rather than a self-contained short story. Chrysalis - ★★★☆☆ Science Fiction - The idea is better than the execution here, but Kowal is starting to explore her common themes and the epistolary style in this one. It's a little clunky, but in later stories she'll come back to this stuff (loss of identity, the tension between art and artist, etc.) and do them better. Rampion - ★★★★★ Fantasy - A short-short that's like a quick jab to the stomach. This embodies the saying, "Be careful what you wish for, for you will surely get it." This is the kind of short, sharp, shock that I like. At the Edge of Dying - ★★★☆☆ Fantasy - Another story that is nicely self-contained but feels rather like it should be longer. Here we have a magic system that is nicely laid-out (the closer you are to death the more powerful your spells), but the world-building behind the story feels underdone. Or at least under-explained. It's the sort of story that's fine on its own but would really benefit from a much longer work. Clockwork Chickadee - ★★☆☆☆ Fantasy - This was the weakest story for me. It's literature and allegory and I'm pretty sure I didn't get it. It's like the mirror of modern art where what you see is who you are and a bit like Aesop's fables. Body Language - ★★★★☆ Science Fiction - Full-on sci-fi puppeteering. This is the inspiration for the cover art. It's not perfect but it's damn close. Kidnapping, AI, telepresence, a chase scene with a robot dog... there's a lot going on here. Waiting for Rain - ★★★★★ Science Fiction - India! Wine! The future! This is a genuinely great story that manages to paint a picture of the future that is both prosaic and interesting, all the while giving us nice character moments. The head-fakes were not totally convincing (such as the wife's suspicions about her husband), but they get turned into something even better. I don't know if the stuff about winemaking is true but it feels like it is, so I feel smarter just for knowing it. For me the biggest plus here comes down to what Asimov once said, "A good Science Fiction writer invents the car; a great Science Fiction writer comes up with the traffic jam." Here Kowal has come up with the traffic jam. We have complete control over the weather in the future, how does that impact vintners? Here you go. First Flight - ★★★★★ Science Fiction - I have to admit that as soon as I saw the words "Huffman Prairie" here I got excited. I grew up near there in Dayton, Ohio, and that's where the Wright Brothers flew the first airplane once they got everything sorted out. (North Carolina dubs itself "First In Flight" but that's total BS. The only reason the Wrights went to Kitty Hawk is for the wind and because that's where the train stopped. You don't get points for one of the greatest inventions of all time just because your state blows.) Anyway, this is time travel and thoroughly entertaining. I do have the minor quibble of how the brothers referred to each other here. I actually got to meet relatives of theirs, including their niece, so I have inside scoop on the family. But I'm not going to hold that against Kowal. This is available on her website. Evil Robot Monkey - ★★★★★ Science Fiction - This is super short and also available on her site. This is the first story of hers I ever read and it's perfect. A tidy little gem of a tale. The Consciousness Problem - ★★★★★ Science Fiction - Cloning! The perils of human cloning examined in a tight little story. Kowal has fully come into her own by now and is complete control. This one also explores the loss of self from a different angle. As I was reading it I was reminded of Pat Benatar's song "My Clone Sleeps Alone." https://youtu.be/PGRr6JpOrOg For Solo Cello, Op. 12 - ★★★★★ Science Fiction - This one is dark and explores the idea of artistic obsession. This is the sort of thing short stories do so well: condense a story down to its core issue and land the punch. For Want of a Nail - ★★★★★ Science Fiction - A nice little parallel between computer memory failings and a person losing their faculties. This is the sort of metaphor I like. Also the fact it takes place on a generation ship is a nice touch, because it ramps up the tension. The Shocking Affair of the Dutch Steamship Friesland - ★★★★☆ Fiction - The only non-SFF story here, this is a Holmes & Watson murder mystery told from the point of view of a bystander to the crime who is nonetheless directly affected by it. This is a very well done epistolary that approximates the style of Arthur Conan Doyle. I thought the mystery was a bit obvious, which is why I give it 4 stars instead of 5. Salt of the Earth - ★★★★★ Science Fiction - This is one of the standout stories here. It is absolutely brutal and perfectly crafted. I would stack this up against any of the great short stories one cares to name, that's how amazing it is. American Changeling - ★★★★☆ Fantasy - This is a decent story that feels more complete than the one which opened the book, but it also feels like it could be (perhaps should be) part of a larger work. Maybe it's because it's a Fantasy, which is where Kowal does most of her novel work, so she thinks in a grander scale for this genre. The White Phoenix Feather: A Tale of Cuisine and Ninjas - ★★★★☆ Science Fiction - This one is a lark that plays with its food. The ninjas of the title are semi-intelligent aliens given that name because of their sword-like arms. There's much more, especially the fetishization of the dining experience. I kind of get the feeling she was reading a lot of John Scalzi's work when she wrote this. We Interrupt This Broadcast - ★★★★★ Science Fiction - This one is a prequel to the next two stories, setting off an alternative history Kowal has revisited a few times. This sucker is an ideal short story in the vein of The Twilight Zone; completely hardcore and encompassing big ideas in a small space. Rockets Red - ★★★★★ Science Fiction - This story was written specifically for this collection, bridging the previous one and the final one. It reminds me of the nice little stories we would get in the Golden Age of Sci-Fi, where we'd just get a tiny slice-of-life tale that implied a far grander backstory rather than detail it. This is chronologically the last story written, so it is one of the most self-assured. She knows she doesn't have to explain everything for it to come across, so she doesn't. This is like seeing a really great artist do a convention sketch, where most of the picture is hinted at rather than drawn in. The Lady Astronaut of Mars - ★★★★★ Science Fiction - Continuing the alternate history, this is another one I had read before, except this time I'd forgotten the details. Again the epistolary style is used and here we find a couple of Kowal's themes repeated and refined; a person's obsession with their vocation, making incredibly tough choices, strong but flawed characters trying to do the right thing, loss of self... All good stuff. This one is also free on her site. That's it. All in all a terrific time was had by all (well, me). The notion of puppets does come up a few times, but then Kowal is a puppeteer by trade, so it's not surprising. Never does that aspect feel shoehorned in but arises naturally the few times it comes up. One thing I like about story collections from a single author is you get to see the tricks they use and their go-to moves become evident. Here we have characters who bite their lips a lot, not to mention throwing up when they get stressed. Seeing those sorts of things repeated makes me wonder if the author is giving us a glimpse into their personal reactions to things or if it's merely used the way Hitchcock focused on hands in his movies, because they could so expressively convey what a character was feeling in a quick way. Even if you don't buy this book, you should read the stories she's made available for free. You won't regret it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    Received to review via Netgalley Word Puppets is a collection of short stories written by Mary Robinette Kowal, arranged — if we can trust the alleged Patrick Rothfuss’ introduction — in the order they were written. I always think that’s a fascinating way to read an author’s work, because you get to watch their skills develop, their interests change, etc. This particular collection comes with an introduction written by Pat Rothfuss… which is a little suspect because in a little game they had on t Received to review via Netgalley Word Puppets is a collection of short stories written by Mary Robinette Kowal, arranged — if we can trust the alleged Patrick Rothfuss’ introduction — in the order they were written. I always think that’s a fascinating way to read an author’s work, because you get to watch their skills develop, their interests change, etc. This particular collection comes with an introduction written by Pat Rothfuss… which is a little suspect because in a little game they had on twitter, Kowal was better at being Rothfuss than Rothfuss was. If that confused you, don’t worry; I think it bent more than a few brains. As a whole, in any case, it’s an entertaining collection. There were one or two weaker points, where by my personal lights the twist was just a little… I saw it coming. ‘For Solo Cello, op. 12’, for example. And looking at the list of titles, there’s some where I can’t figure out which story they were, which you can attribute either to my terrible naming or perhaps less than memorable/well-matched titles/stories. ‘For Want of a Nail’, what was that one… ah, the one with the conflicted AI. Still, for the most part I think Word Puppets is a strong collection, solidly entertaining, and what’s also nice, it has a wide range. Fantasy, various kinds of spec-fic, different settings, older protagonists… And it’s definitely quite different to her Regency/fantasy novels (which I do enjoy, but it’s nice to see Kowal taking on other frontiers). I enjoyed most of the stories, and I think particularly ‘Chrysalis’, ‘Body Language’, ‘The Lady Astronaut of Mars’ and ‘The Consciousness Problem’. Some of them really are sticking in my head, to be thought about later — so that’s a good sign. Originally posted here.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    The Bound Man ⭐️⭐️⭐️.5 Chrysalis ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Rampion ⭐️⭐️⭐️.5 At the Edge of Dying ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Clockwork Chickadee ⭐️⭐️ Body Language ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Waiting for Rain ⭐️⭐️⭐️ First Flight ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Evil Robot Monkey ⭐️⭐️⭐️.5 The Consciousness Problem ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ For Solo Cello, op. 12 ⭐️⭐️⭐️ For Want of a Nail ⭐️⭐️⭐️.5 The Shocking Affair of the Dutch Steamship Friesland ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Salt of the Earth ⭐️⭐️⭐️ American Changeling ⭐️⭐️.5 The White Phoenix Feather ⭐️⭐️ We Interrupt This Broadcast ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Rockets Red ⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Lady Astronaut The Bound Man ⭐️⭐️⭐️.5 Chrysalis ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Rampion ⭐️⭐️⭐️.5 At the Edge of Dying ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Clockwork Chickadee ⭐️⭐️ Body Language ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Waiting for Rain ⭐️⭐️⭐️ First Flight ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Evil Robot Monkey ⭐️⭐️⭐️.5 The Consciousness Problem ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ For Solo Cello, op. 12 ⭐️⭐️⭐️ For Want of a Nail ⭐️⭐️⭐️.5 The Shocking Affair of the Dutch Steamship Friesland ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Salt of the Earth ⭐️⭐️⭐️ American Changeling ⭐️⭐️.5 The White Phoenix Feather ⭐️⭐️ We Interrupt This Broadcast ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Rockets Red ⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Lady Astronaut of Mars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  7. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    I'd read some of these stories before, but its good to have them all in one place. I really enjoyed First Flight and the Hugo-winning Lady Astronaut of Mars the first time I read them, and liked revisiting them - plus they got me in the mood to follow up this collection with Hidden Figures . Of the new ones, there were some delights, like the tale of gastronomy and ninjas, and the story about the motion capture puppet sent to deliver a ransom. The third- and second- last stories then make up a s I'd read some of these stories before, but its good to have them all in one place. I really enjoyed First Flight and the Hugo-winning Lady Astronaut of Mars the first time I read them, and liked revisiting them - plus they got me in the mood to follow up this collection with Hidden Figures . Of the new ones, there were some delights, like the tale of gastronomy and ninjas, and the story about the motion capture puppet sent to deliver a ransom. The third- and second- last stories then make up a sequence with Lady Astronaut. Definitely a worthwhile collection.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kajsa

    Nice collection of short stories. The variation is very good, there is everything from fantasy, historical fiction to sci-fi. The prose is very good and captivates the reader. I'm pleasantly surprised with Mary Robinette Kowal and I'm looking forward to reading more of her books.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Banshee

    Word Puppets is a collection of short stories put together in chronologic order. This allowed me to observe how the author evolved as a writer over time. The pieces are of a variety of fantasy and sci-fi sub-genres. Kowal pulls no punches and many of her stories are striking. Let me write a few words on every story, since I believe each and every one deserves some attention. The Bound Man. It's a very interesting take on fate, where a warrior from the past gets ripped from her time to fulfill the Word Puppets is a collection of short stories put together in chronologic order. This allowed me to observe how the author evolved as a writer over time. The pieces are of a variety of fantasy and sci-fi sub-genres. Kowal pulls no punches and many of her stories are striking. Let me write a few words on every story, since I believe each and every one deserves some attention. The Bound Man. It's a very interesting take on fate, where a warrior from the past gets ripped from her time to fulfill the prophecy far into the future. Equality has gone in the wrong direction: a woman from the past is baffled how horrible the women are treated in the far future - what happened was detoriation instead of progress. I found the writing a bit weak, too straightforward, but it was an early work. Chrysalis. The heroine is a human working as a documentarian on a distant planet. Her job involves recording the life of a Husith called Geroth and editing it according to the wishes. Husiths are insect-like aliens who undergo a transformation at certain stage of their life, but they lose some of the memories in the process. The short story explores a very interesting concept of selective memory by choice. Rampion. A re-telling of Rapunzel's origin story. Short but striking. At the Edge of Dying. A huge and imaginative fantasy world with unique magic contained in just 30 pages. I wish it was a full-length novel. Clockwork Chikadee. A fairy tale as in straight from a H.C. Andersen's collection. Kowal managed to re-create the atmosphere of his bittersweet tales perfectly. Body Language. Te story is a depiction of the profession of a puppeteer in the distant future, where the person can basically become the puppet. The story must have a special place in the author's heart as she's a professional puppeteer herself. Waiting for Rain. The story shows the future in which people have to pay weather control tax, and how it affects the poorer part of the society. It would be fascinating to read more how that affects lives of ordinary people, but instead I had to sit in an uncomfortable headspace of an Indian man whose way of thinking about women doesn't belong even now, let alone in the future. I understand the author's intention, I just didn't enjoy it. First Flight. It's a simple and heart-warming story about time travel. It was interesting to see the rules of time travel in this version explained as a broccoli. Evil Robot Monkey. What if a chimp was given an implant to make it smarter - no longer a monkey, and not yet a human? The Consciousness Problem. After a mysterious accident a female scientist that used to work on cloning project together with her husband, tries to cope with hew newly unreliable brain. Hard-hitting and disturbing. For Solo Cello, op. 12. It's about a musician that lost his hand in an accident. One can almost feel the pain and the fresh trauma he's going through. He's ready to give anything to go back to playing, and when the price is named, the story turns bone-chilling. For Want of a Nail. "If something's important, you shouldn't keep just one copy, make a back-up!" scenario, set on a generation spaceship. We get the law of conservation and philosophical/ethical implications + some family drama. The Shocking Affair the Dutch Steamship Friesland. A Sherlock Holmes adventure story from the perspective of young woman, who has to make a tough choice. Salt of the Earth. A story that takes part on a planet, where salt is a scarce resource. A sad tale about an irresponsible and very stupid father. The world was clearly inspired by Dune. American Changeling. A fantasy story about Faerie. This one was pretty generic and didn't stand out for me. The White Phoenix Feather: A Tale of Cuisine and Ninjas. The story is more or less as ridiculous as the title suggests. In a good way. We Interrupt This Broadcast. Oh. OK. Wow. This certainly puts the whole story of The Calculating Stars and its sequels in a completely new light. Rocket Red. Just a short story in the Lady Astronaut universe. The Lady Astronaut of Mars. This novelette takes place many years after the events of The Calculating Stars. It has a very different tone from what I expected. It made me feel so sad… It's very real, too. One can work so hard, achieve so much, and then life happens. Overall, I really loved Word Puppets. Usually short story collections are a mixed bag for me, with some gems, some duds and some pieces that are perfectly unremarkable. But in here, almost every single story made me feel something and left a strong impression. The stories that were absolute masterpieces for me were: "Chrysalis", "The Consciousness Problem", "For Solo Cello, op. 12", "For Want of a Nail", "We Interrupt This Broadcast" and "The Lady Astronaut of Mars".

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Bennett

    Lovely little concoction of short stories. This is my first Kowal book and it won't be my last. Short stories tend not to be my favorite but if she can write them like these, then I can't wait to read a novel by her.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Fantasy Literature

    Word Puppets is a collection of Mary Robinette Kowal’s short fictions. Fans of her GLAMOURISTS series will find not a single one in its pages, and many of these tales are science fiction, with several stories set on Mars. Patrick Rothfuss provides a humorous introduction, and tells us that these nineteen works are in chronological order. This gives the reader a chance to see Kowal’s development as a story-teller. I am not going to review all nineteen. I will discuss the stories I liked best or fo Word Puppets is a collection of Mary Robinette Kowal’s short fictions. Fans of her GLAMOURISTS series will find not a single one in its pages, and many of these tales are science fiction, with several stories set on Mars. Patrick Rothfuss provides a humorous introduction, and tells us that these nineteen works are in chronological order. This gives the reader a chance to see Kowal’s development as a story-teller. I am not going to review all nineteen. I will discuss the stories I liked best or found most interesting, with one exception; there is one story that was not successful for me. Kowal has created a story universe in which the people of Earth colonized... Read More: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/revi...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Chaplin

    A number of the short stories I had read elsewhere, but there were also several I hadn't read. Like the famous "Evil Robot Monkey" story, which was decidedly less silly than I expected. It's really quite solemn. There were also two more stories in the same universe as "The Lady Astronaut of Mars". It's neat to see the full scope of her capacity, which doesn't come out when you're only looking at the novels.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I’ve been chipping away at this collection, picking up a story here and there when I have a few minutes. When there are so many stories, it’s inevitable that some will stand out more than others, but what stood out the most to me is the incredible imagination and versatility of this author. The stories are all so very different from each other, even the last three that are loosely connected. There’s a lot of thought and emotion in these stories, and I’m glad to have gotten such a thorough sampli I’ve been chipping away at this collection, picking up a story here and there when I have a few minutes. When there are so many stories, it’s inevitable that some will stand out more than others, but what stood out the most to me is the incredible imagination and versatility of this author. The stories are all so very different from each other, even the last three that are loosely connected. There’s a lot of thought and emotion in these stories, and I’m glad to have gotten such a thorough sampling of this author’s talent. Rather than rate all 19 stories, which is my usual custom, I’ll just list my favorites: “Body Language” Kowal is a professional puppeteer, and she puts a neat, futuristic twist on the profession in this story. With its originality and the A.I. (I can’t resist a good A.I.), this story was super up my alley. “Waiting for the Rain” I really liked the family dynamic and plot twist of this one. The idea of weather as a utility that could be taken away if you can’t afford it was really interesting. “First Flight” This one was great. I loved how time travel worked, and that the older the time traveler was the further they could go back in time. “The Consciousness Problem” My favorite of the collection. Lots of emotion packed into this one, and I loved how the main character’s memory issues figured into the cloning plotline. “The White Phoenix Feather” The cleverness, humor, and wild inventiveness of this one really made me smile. Don’t skip the intro by Patrick Rothfuss, as you learn some pretty cool things about the author straight off. My favorite thing I learned is that when she was writing her Regency novels (which I am definitely going to check out) she made a Jane Austen spellcheck dictionary to flag words she needed to look up to make sure they were used during the period. As Rothfuss put it, “She is my kind of crazy.” Shout out to Lisa, whose review brought this collection to my attention. It’s a winner.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Okay, one good thing that happens when you spend the day in bed with a cold - you get to read an entire book of short stories by Mary Robinette Kowal. I was really going after the three "Lady Astronaut" short stories, but there were some lovely ones in this collection - lots of variety and oddness.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This is a completely delightful collection of short stories and I recommend it without reservation.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Villain E

    I'm not generally a fan of short stories. It takes time for me to get emotionally invested. And that was pretty much the case here. Most of these stories, I came away thinking, "Meh, that was okay." I did like the two Hugo Winners, "For Want of a Nail," and "The Lady Astronaut of Mars" (which is why I picked this up in the first place), and I liked "Rockets Red", the story original to this volume. But the other 16 stories in the book just didn't grab me. One thing though: The introduction by Patr I'm not generally a fan of short stories. It takes time for me to get emotionally invested. And that was pretty much the case here. Most of these stories, I came away thinking, "Meh, that was okay." I did like the two Hugo Winners, "For Want of a Nail," and "The Lady Astronaut of Mars" (which is why I picked this up in the first place), and I liked "Rockets Red", the story original to this volume. But the other 16 stories in the book just didn't grab me. One thing though: The introduction by Patrick Rothfuss says that he and Kowal (I'm paraphrasing here) bonded over being word nerds. I would expect someone who's that much of a stickler for language to know that the plural of "ninja" is "ninja."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steve Tetreault

    What it’s about: This is a collection of short stories that bounce around between fantasy and sci fi. They provide some interesting twists and turns to some of the more conventional story tropes one might be used to in these genres. What I thought: Honestly, I picked this up because it was either free or really cheap for my Kindle. It's probably been on my reader for a year or two, and I never got around to it. When I finally made my way to it, I was excited to see that the foreword was by Patri What it’s about: This is a collection of short stories that bounce around between fantasy and sci fi. They provide some interesting twists and turns to some of the more conventional story tropes one might be used to in these genres. What I thought: Honestly, I picked this up because it was either free or really cheap for my Kindle. It's probably been on my reader for a year or two, and I never got around to it. When I finally made my way to it, I was excited to see that the foreword was by Patrick Rothfuss, whose Kingkiller Chronicles I've really enjoyed. His foreword was humorous and engaging and convinced me I should read these stories. And I was not disappointed - Kowal can turn a phrase. I particularly like how there was a connective thread between several of the later stories that was never specifically called out, but if you're paying attention, it's there. Why I rated it like I did: As I said, these are well-written, interesting, engaging stories. I found myself surprised and a little disappointed when I hit the end of the collection; I had gotten so engrossed in the reading that I didn't realize I was at the end. That's pretty high praise!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Back on her birthday, I posted on Facebook, "Dear MRK- In honor of your birthday, I got your most recent book. I figured that was a good present for an author/friend." Now, in May (not because I'm a slow reader, but because I don't often read on my e-reader), I've just finished wrapping the gift she gave me in the stories of Word Puppets. I started it at JordanCon, (which, back in 2012 is where I met the author), and have picked it up here and there, between other books to finish it off. Some of Back on her birthday, I posted on Facebook, "Dear MRK- In honor of your birthday, I got your most recent book. I figured that was a good present for an author/friend." Now, in May (not because I'm a slow reader, but because I don't often read on my e-reader), I've just finished wrapping the gift she gave me in the stories of Word Puppets. I started it at JordanCon, (which, back in 2012 is where I met the author), and have picked it up here and there, between other books to finish it off. Some of the stories were good, some great, some left me with that vague sense of wanting more (which is why I prefer not to read short stories). At least one made me scratch my head and wonder. But none made me want to skip the story, or to stop reading. I also loved how imagery of things which are important or favorites of the author were woven into the stories. However, were one to talk about "my favorite bit" of the book, I must fess up-- it wasn't by our esteemed author, but was the wonderful introduction by Patrick Rothfuss. Icing/cake anyone? All in all, a good collection.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    I think the Glamorist novels are fantastic, but I really like Mary Robinette Kowal's short fiction. As Patrick Rothfuss says in the introduction, the chronological nature of the collection lets you observe how her writing has deepened and blossomed as her career has progressed. My two favorite stories were "The Lady Astronaut of Mars" which still makes me cry when I read it, and "Body Language" which is full of great characters as well as giving a behind-the-scenes look at the world of puppetry, I think the Glamorist novels are fantastic, but I really like Mary Robinette Kowal's short fiction. As Patrick Rothfuss says in the introduction, the chronological nature of the collection lets you observe how her writing has deepened and blossomed as her career has progressed. My two favorite stories were "The Lady Astronaut of Mars" which still makes me cry when I read it, and "Body Language" which is full of great characters as well as giving a behind-the-scenes look at the world of puppetry, where Kowal is a devoted and talented practitioner. I'd love to read more about Saskia, Metta and Patel. I like the way Kowal handles the presence of Artificial Intelligence in her future, it seems eminently plausible and cleverly written.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    I got this as part of a book bundle from Humble Bundle and read it as an ebook. Although I spent about a month reading it, this more reflects that ebooks are usually only used if I find myself out and about without a book to read. Except that after a break of about a dozen physical books, when I picked this up again, I found I couldn't stop. I've read a couple of her novels, but this collection of short stories was very different. And really gripping. I think several of these stories will really I got this as part of a book bundle from Humble Bundle and read it as an ebook. Although I spent about a month reading it, this more reflects that ebooks are usually only used if I find myself out and about without a book to read. Except that after a break of about a dozen physical books, when I picked this up again, I found I couldn't stop. I've read a couple of her novels, but this collection of short stories was very different. And really gripping. I think several of these stories will really stay with me - they were technically very skillful, and really imaginative and thought provoking. This is exactly what I want from a short story collection, and I'd really recommend it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    A good collection, with many strong (and some less, but still enjoyable) pieces that showcase Kowal's evolution as a short fiction writer. Most of these I had read before, either on the author's website or on different magazines, but they didn't lose anything on a second read. The last three stories of the volume, including Rockets Red, original to this book, share the same universe as the extremely touching The Lady Astronaut of Mars, delving in both the past and future of this alternate history A good collection, with many strong (and some less, but still enjoyable) pieces that showcase Kowal's evolution as a short fiction writer. Most of these I had read before, either on the author's website or on different magazines, but they didn't lose anything on a second read. The last three stories of the volume, including Rockets Red, original to this book, share the same universe as the extremely touching The Lady Astronaut of Mars, delving in both the past and future of this alternate history of space travel and punch cards. Personally, I can't wait to read more. Disclaimer: I have been a beta reader for Rockets Red

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tehani

    The biggest problem with this collection is the same problem I have with ALL of MRK's work: I wanted there to be more. More stories, but more importantly, more of EACH story. Kowal has an absolute gift for world building and I could have spent days immersed in each creation in this book, far more than the meager time I had with the individual stories. Powerful and deft, Kowal is a master of the craft.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Pankau

    Loved, loved, loved these. So wonderfully crafted, each of them. If you long for the fabulous short stories of Asimov or Heinlein or Bradbury - read these. Update Aug 2018: Re-read, and they are still a really excellent set of short stores. Love them.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah S

    I've read several of these stories individually, but there were many new to me. It was interesting to see how the ways she explored related themes over time and settings.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gareth

    Evil Robot Monkey on its own is worth 5 stars. Add First Flight and Lady Astronaut of Mars, and you've got an amazing set of stories.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bitty

    Has got to be one of the best introductions I've ever read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    She admits the earlier stuff is not as graceful as the later. The stories towards the end gather some real power, though.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Will

    I just finished this collection tonight. While there were some stories that I really enjoyed, on the whole, they seemed hit or miss to me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Magda Żmijan

    Why, oh why did I wait so long to read this? These stories are fantastic! I loved the ideas, the worlds, the characters. And the introduction by Patrick Rothfuss too :D (I can't believe I haven't read his books yet... will fix it soon, I hope.). First a few words about each of the stories, about the things I liked about them. The Bound Man - The stories are supposed to be set chronologically as they were written, so the first stories were the oldest. I loved this one! Well, I do like Asian culture Why, oh why did I wait so long to read this? These stories are fantastic! I loved the ideas, the worlds, the characters. And the introduction by Patrick Rothfuss too :D (I can't believe I haven't read his books yet... will fix it soon, I hope.). First a few words about each of the stories, about the things I liked about them. The Bound Man - The stories are supposed to be set chronologically as they were written, so the first stories were the oldest. I loved this one! Well, I do like Asian culture and the first story has a Japanese feel at the start and magical at that. Add to it a bit of a time-travel, some troll slaying and it's all fun. Yes, the story is not perfect - I missed the fight scenes, at least, the main one. The story simply skipped it. But the idea was fantastic. Chrysalis - How about a bit of a science-fiction? This is a curious story about a woman, who travels to an alien planet to become a documentarian. Why? You will have to read it to see. It was a curious story and I liked how it ended, even if it was a bit rushed. Rampion - That one was unexpected - a short introduction, or maybe a retelling of beginnings of Rapunzel's story. Maybe nothing unexpected, but curious. At the Edge of Dying - Ooooh, this was good. A fantastic idea of a magic system. Based on faith and... death. The closer to death you are the stronger is the magic in you. And this one has a detailed battle scene proving the author can do it and can do it well! I'd love to read more stories from this world. Clockwork Chickadee - Well, this story wasn't something I liked, but not because the story was but, but because it was told from the perspective of a manipulative character driven by an unreasonable revenge. Body Language - Maybe you'd like a crime story? This one is set in an s-f environment where robotics is pretty advanced and when sometimes puppeteers are just the right choice to use as an agent. Well plotted, even with this length. Quite enjoyable and with a bit of a thrill at the end. Love the ending! Waiting for Rain - An adorable and very romantic love story. Yup, that's pretty much what it is. Don't let the vineyard fool you ;). First Flight - An interesting concept of time-travel, where you can only travel in time within your life span. Curious idea, but very limited. It would be a pity if that was the only way to do it. And what happens here? Our heroine is sent back in time to witness the third flight of the Wright brothers Evil Robot Monkey - A short and rather sad story when you think of it. Maybe a bit too short, I'm not very good with flash fiction, but I feel if anything else would've been out of place. The Consciousness Problem - This one reminded me of at least two movies about clones or robotic substitutes - Surrogates is one of them. It was a curious story and I still wonder about few things, but I do like how it ended with a promise. For Solo Cello, op. 12 - Let's talk about weird stories now :). Weird, but not very happy. It's about a famous cellist who had lost his hand and is willing to give anything to be able to play again. The only thing I can tell you about how this one made me feel is - disappointment. Not in the story, but in him and his decisions. For Want of a Nail - For some reason I have no idea what to write about this story. I do remember what had happened, but I can't decide whether I liked it or not. It was a piece of an s-f tale, everything happened on some kind of spaceship, but I think I couldn't get a full view of this world they lived in. Yes, I think that's it - the world building was lacking here. I think it's a short story, but I couldn't get into it without understanding how everything works here and the vague information that was given to us simply weren't enough. The Shocking Affair of the Dutch steamship Friesland - A bit of a mystery story with the appearance of Holmes and Watson. All told from the perspective of a young woman who took part in the affairs. Curious, but lacked the tension and the mystery was simply revealed without any need of looking for clues. Salt of the Earth - Somehow I couldn't get myself to like this story. It all sounded so ridiculous. I get that the lack of salt might make some food conservation harder, but there are other ways to do it, so why would anyone care so much for the salt? Seriously, food would taste better without it, we're just so used to it that we can't help adding some. Anyway, I might've not liked the idea, but the story was well crafted and the ending was simply perfect :). American Changeling - What would you do if you were a full blooded fae brought up in human world only to open the gate to the faery world again? First of all - get used to the iron! That's what Kim has to deal with when she grows up to fulfill her destiny. Good idea, but the story could use few more pages. Or a whole book. It seriously has a potential, but it was way too short and everything happened a bit chaotically and too fast. The White Phoenix Feather - That was fun! I really enjoyed the combination of fighting and experiencing good food. The heroine was fantastic! This is definitely one of the stories I'd love to be expanded into a full novel. It reminded me a bit of "Grillbar Galactica", that book was also a bit ridiculous and all about food :P. We Interrupt This Broadcast - This and the following two stories chow us the possibility of what might've happened :). Yes, it seems with that technology it would be unreachable, but who knows if one twisted mind decided that's the way the history should go. Rockets Red - A lovely story on how to create a community with such a simple task. It shows you there can always be a way out of a bad situation if you'll simply ask for help. Oh, and "Bradbury Space Center" was a nice touch :D. Love the name. The Lady Astronaut of Mars - A sad ending to this story set, but very well written. In such a short time it makes you care for the characters, makes you wonder whether you'd made the same choice. Wow, that was a variety of stories. Quite an imagination to create them all and make them so distinct. When I've started reading these stories, I simply couldn't stop! They pull you in, make you want more and more. I do wish some of these were longer. I do need to check out her other works. I remember I didn't much like "Glamour in glass" but I might give it another go, maybe I wasn't in a mood for it before. Oh, and by the way - I did like the stories from the first half of the book more than the later ones. It's funny, because as it was mentioned in the introduction they were set up chronologically. Maybe I preferred author's earlier imagination better :). Or maybe these were just the topics I liked a bit more. I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. check my reviews at https://maginibooks.wordpress.com

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kiera

    I really like Mary Robinette Kowal as a short fiction writer. She writes really diverse stories that don’t feel same-y. You don’t read the story and say “oh, it’s a Mary Robinette Kowal”, you read the story and say “That was good, who wrote it – oh! Mary Robinette Kowal. No wonder it was good.” It’s weird praise, but some writers have really distinctive styles and tones and types of stories they write, themes they can’t get away from. Not so here, Kowal just writes good stories and they’re so va I really like Mary Robinette Kowal as a short fiction writer. She writes really diverse stories that don’t feel same-y. You don’t read the story and say “oh, it’s a Mary Robinette Kowal”, you read the story and say “That was good, who wrote it – oh! Mary Robinette Kowal. No wonder it was good.” It’s weird praise, but some writers have really distinctive styles and tones and types of stories they write, themes they can’t get away from. Not so here, Kowal just writes good stories and they’re so varied you think it couldn’t have been her, but they all are. Really the clockwork bird story and that hard scifi about clones and the alternate history lady astronaut story? Yes. I liked that this collection was organised chronologically across her career, so you can see the development of themes and skill over time. My favourites were: The Bound Man, Waiting for Rain, Salt of the Earth, American Changeling and The Lady Astronaut of Mars (which you can read for free here, and has been turned into two novels!). Even in that selection you’ve got fantasy, light and hard scifi, urban fantasy and alternate history/historical fiction. Well worth a read if you’re a fan of Kowal’s or if you’re looking for a good varied collection of short fiction. This review was first published on Chapters in Flux: (http://www.chaptersinflux.com/book-re...)

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