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Dragons of a Fallen Sun

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The people of Krynn have known war in past ages. Some are still alive who remember the triumph of good at the conclusion of the War of the Lance. Still more remember the devastation of the Chaos War, which ended the Fourth Age of the world. But now a new war is about to begin, more terrible than any have known. This war is one for the very heart and soul of the world itself The people of Krynn have known war in past ages. Some are still alive who remember the triumph of good at the conclusion of the War of the Lance. Still more remember the devastation of the Chaos War, which ended the Fourth Age of the world. But now a new war is about to begin, more terrible than any have known. This war is one for the very heart and soul of the world itself. The War of Souls.


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The people of Krynn have known war in past ages. Some are still alive who remember the triumph of good at the conclusion of the War of the Lance. Still more remember the devastation of the Chaos War, which ended the Fourth Age of the world. But now a new war is about to begin, more terrible than any have known. This war is one for the very heart and soul of the world itself The people of Krynn have known war in past ages. Some are still alive who remember the triumph of good at the conclusion of the War of the Lance. Still more remember the devastation of the Chaos War, which ended the Fourth Age of the world. But now a new war is about to begin, more terrible than any have known. This war is one for the very heart and soul of the world itself. The War of Souls.

30 review for Dragons of a Fallen Sun

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nick Borrelli

    This is probably my favorite Dragonlance series from Margaret Weis and Traci Hickman. I love dragons and this one hits all the right chords where that is concerned. I feel like this series is under the radar compared to their more popular Dragonlance books, but for me they outdid themselves here and the writing is phenomenal. If you like dwarves, dragons, wizards, and traditional fantasy in the vein of Terry Brooks, then this one should be at the top of your list of series to read. I've read it This is probably my favorite Dragonlance series from Margaret Weis and Traci Hickman. I love dragons and this one hits all the right chords where that is concerned. I feel like this series is under the radar compared to their more popular Dragonlance books, but for me they outdid themselves here and the writing is phenomenal. If you like dwarves, dragons, wizards, and traditional fantasy in the vein of Terry Brooks, then this one should be at the top of your list of series to read. I've read it about five times since it was first published. Great stuff.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Greg Strandberg

    Just not where I want to be going. We've got a terrible problem with Dragonlance, and that's the fact that the first 3 books were so darn good, and they were good because they were so negative and depressing and, well...world-ending. So you get a real twisted and tough canonical that's hard to do much with. And boy, have they tried just about everything with Dragonlance but throwing the kitchen sink on the cover and having a gully dwarf come up the drain pipe (2016 maybe?) I like Dragonlance, I jus Just not where I want to be going. We've got a terrible problem with Dragonlance, and that's the fact that the first 3 books were so darn good, and they were good because they were so negative and depressing and, well...world-ending. So you get a real twisted and tough canonical that's hard to do much with. And boy, have they tried just about everything with Dragonlance but throwing the kitchen sink on the cover and having a gully dwarf come up the drain pipe (2016 maybe?) I like Dragonlance, I just didn't much like this book or the trilogy of books that dealt with a new world and cataclysm. I didn't much like the New Generation. All in all, why can't I just have a time machine back to the early 80s, when things were simple?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ugur

    Dragons of a Fallen Sun is the first book of the Dragonlance: The War of Souls series and written by Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman in 2000. Like other Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman novels, reading this book is enjoyable. It is nice to read good novels in Dragonlance world. Forty years passed after the Chaos War which destructs everything in Dragonlance universe. Dragons have divided the continent and reigning the humans, elves and dwarves. Magical powers are fading and gods have left the world. But Dragons of a Fallen Sun is the first book of the Dragonlance: The War of Souls series and written by Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman in 2000. Like other Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman novels, reading this book is enjoyable. It is nice to read good novels in Dragonlance world. Forty years passed after the Chaos War which destructs everything in Dragonlance universe. Dragons have divided the continent and reigning the humans, elves and dwarves. Magical powers are fading and gods have left the world. But there are some changes, a new god is emerging without a name. Mina who is the priestess of the one god, the Nameless God become the leader of Knights of Neraka which was previously serving to Takhisis. Tas has traveled from back to the current time and find this future is different from what he has remembered. The previous future world was much better, most of his friends are living, elves have united as a one nation, Palin was the head of the whites. But in this new future everything is destroyed, there is no magic, elves are still fighting each other, Palin become a black etc. It’s interesting to read a time-travel themed Dragonlance novel.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    It took me a little while to get into this book because it starts with characters I don't know and ones who aren't very likable. The story picks up when familiar characters come into play, and then, when Weis and Hickman go back to the characters from the beginning, I didn't mind as much. The other reason this book is only three stars for me, though, is that much of it feels like exposition, not actual storytelling. I want more connection to action, dialogue, and the characters. My favorite part It took me a little while to get into this book because it starts with characters I don't know and ones who aren't very likable. The story picks up when familiar characters come into play, and then, when Weis and Hickman go back to the characters from the beginning, I didn't mind as much. The other reason this book is only three stars for me, though, is that much of it feels like exposition, not actual storytelling. I want more connection to action, dialogue, and the characters. My favorite parts are with Tasslehoff, Gilthas, and Silvan because those parts have the most immediacy and development. I think Weis and Hickman do a good job of fitting their own vision for Krynn with Jean Rabe's story line. They're kind of dismissive of some of her ideas, which bothers me, but I understand that she took their characters and world in a direction they may not have liked but had to work with. Still, I grew to really like Rabe's world and characters, so that's a little disappointing. Overall, I'm curious about this series now. I like the way the different threads come together in the end, and I'm starting to become curious about Mina, a character I REALLY didn't like but one who is starting to make more sense to me now. I still don't care for her, and it's really annoying how everyone instantly falls in love with her and does anything for her. I wish Weis and Hickman developed her power a little bit more and made it less sentimental, but it got better towards the end. All in all, I recommend this to DL fans, but you might be disappointed if you're expecting a story along the same lines and of the same caliber as the original Chronicles. I think this story does suffer, and there's some repetition and lack of creativity. Hopefully, that changes with book two!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    It wasn't a BAD book per say, it's just that the ending left me kind of embittered, and I thought there were a few characters that just absolutely destroyed the book for me (Mina.....) As a disclaimer, I have always loved the combination of Weis and Hickman, but I couldn't really get behind this one. Throughout the series, they just kept throwing character after character at the reader, introducing new story arcs, but not doing much with them, and I felt that the ending left quite a few loose str It wasn't a BAD book per say, it's just that the ending left me kind of embittered, and I thought there were a few characters that just absolutely destroyed the book for me (Mina.....) As a disclaimer, I have always loved the combination of Weis and Hickman, but I couldn't really get behind this one. Throughout the series, they just kept throwing character after character at the reader, introducing new story arcs, but not doing much with them, and I felt that the ending left quite a few loose strands, and you never get to find out or get any resolution about them. It was well-written, and a couple characters had me empathizing with them, since they had depth and were well developed (Tas and Gerard), and the story being given through the eyes of the evil faction was pretty inventive as well. I wanted to like this book more, but it came short of my expectations.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael Timmins

    Though it has been years since I have read this book, I still remember it fondly. Set in the future of the original Dragonlance books it still holds the same quality of writing and the same epic quality. A truly great fantasy read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    The first big trilogy from Weiss and Hickmann since Legends. I have read it once and I think I have tried reading it a couple of times since but not really getting into it - not sure why because this time around, I really liked it. A new player stands on the face of Krynn, Mina, a young girl, follower of the One God. Able to predict the future, heal the sick and look into the hearts of people around her, Mina soon gets a huge following of Knights of Neraka and mercenaries. Meanwhile, Tas suddenly The first big trilogy from Weiss and Hickmann since Legends. I have read it once and I think I have tried reading it a couple of times since but not really getting into it - not sure why because this time around, I really liked it. A new player stands on the face of Krynn, Mina, a young girl, follower of the One God. Able to predict the future, heal the sick and look into the hearts of people around her, Mina soon gets a huge following of Knights of Neraka and mercenaries. Meanwhile, Tas suddenly appears in Solace after being presumed dead for 30 years and a young knight, Gerard uth Mondar, travels with him to Qualinest to meet up with Laurana, Palin and the young king Gilthas. Qualinest, being controlled by the dark knights, are not so easily entered but Gerard and Tas manages, setting events in motion they hadn't even dreamed of. In Silvanost, young Silvan, son of dark elves Porthios and Alhana Starbreeze, suddenly finds himself inside the shield the elves have risen to keep out everybody else and finds himself on the throne of Silvanost, a country rapidly dying because of the power of the shield. As always, Weiss and Hickmann manages to keep many storylines in the air at once and keeping you guessing as to what will happen and how it all will come together.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    "OK, guys, let's take everything that everybody liked about the Dragonlance setting and get rid of it." That's essentially what happened with the introduction of the Fifth Age. From what I hear, this same error was repeated in the Forgotten Realms setting nearly a decade later as D&D moved forward into its 4th edition rule set. Although when I decided Dragonlance sucked now I just started reading Drizzt books, so you know... whatever. I have the young and dumb shelf for a reason. "OK, guys, let's take everything that everybody liked about the Dragonlance setting and get rid of it." That's essentially what happened with the introduction of the Fifth Age. From what I hear, this same error was repeated in the Forgotten Realms setting nearly a decade later as D&D moved forward into its 4th edition rule set. Although when I decided Dragonlance sucked now I just started reading Drizzt books, so you know... whatever. I have the young and dumb shelf for a reason.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Beau

    Top-notch fantasy. One of my favorite Dragonlance novels. Full of mystery, psychology, humor, politics, and action. Weis and Hickman are masters of writing from the point of view of the evil characters. They are also excellent at creating flawed, ambiguous characters. This book won't be very enjoyable (or completely understandable) unless you've read most of the prior major Dragonlance novels: at least the Chronicles trilogy, the Legends trilogy, Second Generation, Dragons of Summer Flame, and th Top-notch fantasy. One of my favorite Dragonlance novels. Full of mystery, psychology, humor, politics, and action. Weis and Hickman are masters of writing from the point of view of the evil characters. They are also excellent at creating flawed, ambiguous characters. This book won't be very enjoyable (or completely understandable) unless you've read most of the prior major Dragonlance novels: at least the Chronicles trilogy, the Legends trilogy, Second Generation, Dragons of Summer Flame, and the Dragons of a New Age trilogy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris Strehlow

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Personal Response: I believe this book is good, but it has a lot of setup for the future. I am hoping the next book will follow more on Gerard and Qualinesti, because there was very little of it near the end. In the beginning I was confused because the story was from many characters point of views, but then they started to meet up and it all came together. I look forward to reading the next book in the series, and possibly going back and reading previous series. Plot: There are many main characte Personal Response: I believe this book is good, but it has a lot of setup for the future. I am hoping the next book will follow more on Gerard and Qualinesti, because there was very little of it near the end. In the beginning I was confused because the story was from many characters point of views, but then they started to meet up and it all came together. I look forward to reading the next book in the series, and possibly going back and reading previous series. Plot: There are many main characters, but it starts off with Galdar, who meets Mina and restores his sword arm in the name of The One God. Galdar and his troops follow Mina who leads them into battle for a victory against the Solamnics. They then spend most of the book traveling to Silvanesti where they hope to penetrate the shield. Tasslehoff Burrfoot has been dead 30 years, until he uses an artifact to travel forward through time to speak at a funeral. He meets Gerard, a Solamnic Knight who is duty bound to honor a man’s last wish. They travel to Qualinesti to meet Palin Majere and deliver the artifact to him. He wants to meet with a colleague in Solace to inspect the artifact. Palin believes that since Tas went forward and didn’t sacrifice himself, he messed up the past. Palin scares Tas and tries to send him back to his death, so Tas runs away to the Citadel of Light. While their, Goldmoon somehow changed back into her younger self. Beryl discovers the artifact is in the Citadel, and she travels out to obtain it. Silvanoshei is with is mother when they are attacked by ogres, and he is sent to get help from the Legion of Steel, only to get knocked unconscious and fall in a ravine. When he awakes, he is inside of the shield that protects Silvanesti. He then becomes King and learns the politics of court. When Mina and her band of warriors make it into the shield, he captures and falls in love with Mina. She helps him kill Cyan Bloodbane, who was disguised as Glaucous, the elf who maintained the Shield Tree. She then helps him to take down the shield surrounding Silvanesti, but leaves before he can see her. Mina has a large number of forces that are entering the area to help conquer Silvanesti when the story ends. Characterization: Palin Majere is a broken wizard, and has lost everything. So when Tas shows up with a magical artifact. When he uses the artifact, he doesn’t see any history past the chaos war and blames Tas. He believes that since Tas didn’t die, it caused a rift in time, and yells at Tas to go back and die. When Tas runs, Palin realizes what he has done, and tries to find him to reconcile. He understands that he was too harsh, and tries to calm down in the future. Marshal Medan is the leader of the Knights of Neraka in Qualinesti, and was sent there by Beryl. He is a strict man, but also has some compassion. He has fallen in love with the Queen Mother, Laurana. He is seen as following what Beryl says, but he likes the people of Qualinesti, so he plots against Beryl. He lets Palin and Tas escape, and makes Gerard his servant. At the end of the book, he arrests Laurana so that he can protect her. Setting: Dragons of a Fallen Sun takes place in many different areas. They include Solace, Qualinesti, Silvanesti, and even the woods around Silvanesti. Having many different characters make the story jump around from place to place. It takes place after the Chaos War. No definite time or date was mentioned, but it follows some time after Dragon’s of a Summer Flame. Recommendation: I would recommend this book to high school seniors and up because there is some graphic content. In addition to the graphic content it is an all around difficult read. I would also recommend it to people who enjoy fantasy books and can persevere through parts of the story that are boring.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ren

    Wow! For my first Dragonlance book experience that was great! I commend the authors on doing a stunningly amazing job at creating and developing their characters. Mina was.... Mina was simply amazing. I loved her from the moment she appeared in a blaze of lightning and hailstorm among the great black monoliths. I cheered for Mina as her Knights did, I worried as Galdar did when her footsteps faltered. Everything about her character was amazing in my opinion. I have to say that I am so enamored w Wow! For my first Dragonlance book experience that was great! I commend the authors on doing a stunningly amazing job at creating and developing their characters. Mina was.... Mina was simply amazing. I loved her from the moment she appeared in a blaze of lightning and hailstorm among the great black monoliths. I cheered for Mina as her Knights did, I worried as Galdar did when her footsteps faltered. Everything about her character was amazing in my opinion. I have to say that I am so enamored with her character at this point that I honestly cannot tell whether or not she is a villain or a hero at this point. All I know is that I'm rooting for her. I want to take up her battle cry with her soldiers and I want to follow her story to the very end. She is so... inexorably charismatic and unyielding. She truly does capture the reader. (view spoiler)[I must say my favorite part concerning her, minus the battle at Sanction, was the way she slipped past the shield. I don't know why but that quote... it gave me shivers. I love how she so calmly, in the name of her One God, found a way around the barrier of Silvanesti much to the awe of her followers and confusion, as well as anger, of the Ogres. (hide spoiler)] Galdar was a very good character as well and I am excited to see where he ends up as. He loves Mina but at the same time he speaks against her when he feels its necessary. He has a mind of his own and frequently voices it, if not aloud than to himself at least. Silvanoshei.... I'm not quite sure what to think about him. While I liked him in the beginning, he quickly became rather moody and tiresome by the end of the book. I admired him in some places, but I am very much on the fence about how I feel about him. (view spoiler)[I don't know how I feel about his "romance" with Mina either. I do not see Mina as the type to be loved in that way. I don't know. I think that she would realize that such an emotion, at a romantic level, would be counterproductive to her cause. Whatever that cause may be. I'll have to see about this later on. (hide spoiler)] I am very curious to learn about his mother, Alhana Starbreeze, and his father, Porthios. I am hoping that when I back track and read the previous books belonging to Dragonlance that I will be able to see more of them. The same goes for Goldmoon, Jenna,Laurana the Queen Mother and this Dalmar (as well as Raistlin) that I keep hearing about. Gerard... I did not like him one inkling to begin with. He irritated me with his constant brooding attitude and his mistreatment of Tasslehoff. (view spoiler)[I mean come on. Even after he realized that Tas was the real deal, he was still an ultra dick to him. Racist much? I'm glad that in the end he realized the futility of his anger towards the kender. (hide spoiler)] Ultimately, I have to admit that while I do not like him he does deserve, and command, a grudging respect. And Palin? I wanted to throttle Palin and his angst. Tas was amazing though. He was obviously the comic relief and I quite enjoyed it. However, he did bring up some very insightful outlooks throughout the book. He was a funny character, rather adorable I think. I pitied him a great deal, though. I've got to say, I like his Gnome from the Hedge Maze. Really funny. Overall, it was a great book to start my Dragonlance experience. While I didn't understand all the terms, I quickly began to pick up on everything. The only thing that I fault the authors for is there ocassional habbit of info-dumping. I am not going to complain a great deal about this, though, considering that it was quite useful to me (and probably to other newcomers of the series). I also do not know how much of the information given is common knowledge among the fanbase that has read the previous books either. Once again, awesome book. Sucked me in from the start and I had a very difficult time putting it down. FOR THE LOVE OF MINA!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    It's been a long while since I've last touched a Dragonlance novel. After reading many other fantasy books during the interim, I finally can see why many readers desperately wanted the original authors of the Dragonlance novels to write the next trilogy of books and hopefully, beyond that as well. It's definitely not the case that I think the other fantasy authors are not good. It's just that every good author(s) should have a distinctive writing style to make their book unique and both Margaret It's been a long while since I've last touched a Dragonlance novel. After reading many other fantasy books during the interim, I finally can see why many readers desperately wanted the original authors of the Dragonlance novels to write the next trilogy of books and hopefully, beyond that as well. It's definitely not the case that I think the other fantasy authors are not good. It's just that every good author(s) should have a distinctive writing style to make their book unique and both Margaret and Tracy have done an excellent job in reminding me of why I started reading fantasy novels in the first place. For the most part, the authors have done a pretty good job of filling in the readers of what happened during the Dragons of a New Age trilogy (the one I skipped over). This is very important because events do carry over. In this fifth age, the occupants of Krynn find themselves without magic power for their Gods have abandoned them in order to save them. One of the main focuses in Dragons of the Fallen Sun consists of the elven nations of Qualinesti and Silvanesti. We get to meet new characters such as Mina, Galdar and Gerard (he might have made an appearance in earlier series but I can't remember). Other more familiar characters such as Tas, Palin, Goldmoon and Caramon return as well. It's hard to imagine a world where dragons rule over humans and non-humans as well but yet that is exactly what becomes of Krynn in Dragons of the Fallen Sun. It's always hard for me to write a review of a book because I always fear of spoiling it. With Dragon's of a Fallen Sun, this is even more so because there are many plot lines and things can get complicated very fast. Suffice it to say, this book is very plot-driven. However, it doesn't get boring at all in my opinion. The one minor gripe I have is with some of the dislikeable characters. At certain times, I feel like wringing the necks of Mina, Gilthas and Silvan. They are not necessarily bad characters, but there's just something irritating about them at times. Mina is a young girl who came out of nowhere one stormy night and quickly awed and shocked an entire army due to her healing powers. Throughout the book, not much information is given about her other than the fact that she's young, has magical healing abilities, is beautiful, and is on some secret mission. Good or evil, you can't really make her out yet you're suppose to think of her as some sort of divine being sent down by some nameless God. Yes, it does get irritating. The story in Dragons of a Fallen Sun is complicated like I have mentioned above. It's very hard to summarize it in a simple paragraph because there is so many back history to the world of Krynn. Although you technically can choose Dragons of a Fallen Sun as the very first Dragonlance novel you read, I really don't recommend it. The ending definitely sets up a cliff hanger of some sort and many questions are left unanswered until the next book comes around. I've read other reviews stating that the authors did a much better job with some of the dislikable characters I mentioned above so that's definitely a good sign. While I do feel that Dragons of a Fallen Sun is a pretty long book, I don't consider it a drag or bore. I never found myself even having the urge to skip any pages. This I attribute of course, to the awesome authors of this book/series. Long live the Dragonlance chronicles!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nicolas

    The gods have abandoned Krynn, the people on their own, struggling to find their own magic. Faith has begun to flounder and people hunger for something to believe in. Then, Mina, a young girl with close shaven red hair appears, professing the power of the "One God". A god who did not abandon Krynn and was here. From her a cult begins to spring, the power of this god flowing through her and causing her amber gaze to lock thousands in service to her. The forces of light seemed doomed as Mina and h The gods have abandoned Krynn, the people on their own, struggling to find their own magic. Faith has begun to flounder and people hunger for something to believe in. Then, Mina, a young girl with close shaven red hair appears, professing the power of the "One God". A god who did not abandon Krynn and was here. From her a cult begins to spring, the power of this god flowing through her and causing her amber gaze to lock thousands in service to her. The forces of light seemed doomed as Mina and her dark horde slowly gain ground. That is, until Tasselhoff Burrfoot, long dead hero of the lance, travels to the present by means of a magic device. When he lands he says that time is wrong. Something has changed the events in time and everything is all wrong. What has changed time? To discover you will have to read this book, the first in the War of Souls trilogy by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, the original authors of the first Dragonlance trilogy along with many follow-ups. This duo has had practice in perfecting the mythology of Krynn and this book is bound to capture those experienced and those new to the universe that is Dragonlance. What happened to the gods? What happened to time? And, what in the world is Tasslehoff doing time traveling again? All these are to be answered in this and the next books in the War of Souls trilogy. I garuntee that once you pick this book up, you won't stop until the trilogy, and quite possibly many more books in the Dragonlance series, sit comfortably read upon your shelves (or e-readers). This book is among my favorites, the Dragonlance series as a whole easily making it to one of my most cherished series. I assure you that you will, in the end, join me in my love of this incredible fantasy series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Toby

    I wouldn't say I was a precocious reader, but once I learned how I fell in love with it. Reading for pleasure was a hobby I developed early, and as it turned out the genres I gravitated towards were fantasy and adventure. I remember the transitional books I was into between "juvenile" and "adult" reading -- I was a big fan of the Choose Your Own Adventure clone Time Machine which had the audacity to put learning into my adventure stories as they all took place in historical periods, from the time I wouldn't say I was a precocious reader, but once I learned how I fell in love with it. Reading for pleasure was a hobby I developed early, and as it turned out the genres I gravitated towards were fantasy and adventure. I remember the transitional books I was into between "juvenile" and "adult" reading -- I was a big fan of the Choose Your Own Adventure clone Time Machine which had the audacity to put learning into my adventure stories as they all took place in historical periods, from the time of the dinosaurs to World War II. After I ripped through Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia without getting hung up on the Christian allegory of it, I was teed-up for a career in genre fiction. I even remember the moment I "graduated" to the adult shelves of the bookstore, as I walked past the Fantasy section and all the colorful cover art, turned out to face the room, caught my eye. One book in particular was emerald green with a cover painting featuring a trio of fantasy characters with a dragon behind them. It featured an elaborate logo that said "Dragonlance" and that's all I needed to dive in. I had my five bucks, I bought the book, pocketed my change, and started reading it on the way home. It was Dragons of Spring Dawning by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, names I'd never heard before. Eventually I realized that I'd made a hasty mistake in starting with the third book of a trilogy, but that was a problem soon remedied, as I was hooked. Over the years there have been something like 170 books with that elaborate "Dragonlance" logo on them, by dozens of authors, but I did not stay in that particular pocket long enough to read them all. Through all that content there is one through-line, though, that I did stick with, the line towed by Weis & Hickman via their dozen or so Dragonlance books. These tell the core story of the shared Dragonlance universe (a universe, I later learned, that was also shared with the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game). This book, Dragons of a Fallen Sun, came out in 2000, some 15 years from the beginning of the Dragonlance Saga and a good decade since I'd stopped reading them regularly (though I did read Dragons of Summer Flame at some point in the mid-90s). Yet it is 18 years since its release that I finally find a nostalgic urge to dip into the world of Krynn again alongside its best storytellers. Right off the bat, this is not the book to start with if one has never read Dragonlance before. Though it features enough exposition to support its own narrative, it does not engage in world building. This ought to be expected given that it takes place in a world supported by over a hundred novels before its publication. One should at least have read and been fans of the other Weis & Hickman Dragonlance novels; it is not necessary to have read the whole shebang. As the first release in a new trilogy ("The War of Souls"), Dragons of a Fallen Sun is mostly set-up material. The cast of characters is introduced, some plot wheels are set in motion, and minor short-lived conflicts spring to life and are resolved within its pages. For characters we have a few familiar faces like Tasslehoff Burrfoot (who died 30 years ago), the priestess Goldmoon, the elf matriarch Laurana, and the legendary fighter Caramon Majere. These guys were all key players in Weis & Hickman's original Dragonlance Chronicles and their reappearance seems like fan service, though Tasslehoff does introduce the plot's McGuffin, a powerful magical artifact. There is also Palin Majere, Caramon's son, who has previously featured in Dragonlance fiction; Gilthas, Laurana's son who is now King of the Elves; and Silvanoshei, Gilthas's cousin who becomes King of some different Elves. New characters include Mina, a mysterious young girl who shows up out of nowhere to proselytize her One True God and lead evil armies; and Gerard, a member of the super-honorable Solamnic Knights but who is not all that into it and undertakes a more pragmatic approach to problem-solving than the typical stodgy Knight (a foil, in some ways, to the long-deceased character Sturm Brightblade). The setting of Dragons of a Fallen Sun is the world of Krynn, a more or less generic high fantasy world of Tolkienesque mythical races, magic, dragons, and a constant futile struggle of good vs evil. The wrench in the gears of the world is that magic is departing, which leaves everyone who relies upon it as their source of power in the lurch. Likewise, the Gods have all departed, taking their divine interventionism with them, leaving priests and clerics to use herbal poultices to heal wounds instead of casting Cure Light Wounds and rolling 1d8. One piece of exposition that is repeated a few times is how the world of Krynn now has only one moon in its sky, which is different to the three that used to be there. This is of special consternation to Tasslehoff Burrfoot, a fan favorite from long ago who is supposed to have been dead for decades. Instead, he pops into the world and the story to introduce the McGuffin, to provide comic relief and fan service, and to be the reader's surrogate in the much-changed world of Krynn. You see, Tasslehoff has (spoiler) traveled forward through time with the aid of a powerful magical artifact, but the future into which he's arrived is not the future he expected. I do not know if the Krynn status quo has been well-established by other Dragonlance books leading up to this one but I do suspect that Weis & Hickman perfectly anticipated readers like me who might drop in after a long absence just because of their names on the cover. To that end, Tasslehoff is in the same position as the reader might be, so if he's confused by some fact of the world ("What do you mean Dragons rule the land?"), so are we, and the exposition is provided to both of us. I found this to be a great narrative device throughout the book, which makes it accessible to casual and hardcore Dragonlance readers. Nothing much happens in this book, which is not to say that it is boring. Rather it is setting up for the next volume in the trilogy, so we spend most of the time meeting the players and setting the contexts; putting threads in motion but not quite allowing them to collide. Mysteries are established and not quite solved. Fights are started but not quite concluded. The writing is fine. Weis & Hickman have been at it now as a team and on their own for dozens of books over the years. There is humor and heart in it. Overall, it's a fast-paced and smooth read that encourages one to move into the rest of the trilogy (and to revisit some of the older works).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erik Akre

    This book was great! I can't think of anything to complain about, try as I might. The writing is solid enough that you don't notice it; the plot is well-woven and inventive. One is kept in proper suspension-tension. The characters are finely-made enough to be believable... It's a "what's not to like?" experience. I'm tempted to say that this series is the D-and-D'd cousin to George R.R. Martin's Game of Thrones, but really I know much better than that. It isn't a masterpiece of that magnitude, bu This book was great! I can't think of anything to complain about, try as I might. The writing is solid enough that you don't notice it; the plot is well-woven and inventive. One is kept in proper suspension-tension. The characters are finely-made enough to be believable... It's a "what's not to like?" experience. I'm tempted to say that this series is the D-and-D'd cousin to George R.R. Martin's Game of Thrones, but really I know much better than that. It isn't a masterpiece of that magnitude, but nevertheless, despite (or because of?) its relative lack of sophistication, I plowed through its 600+ pages in a single week. As they say, "I couldn't put it down." I haven't read anything like it before. Other fantasy authors generally attempt to do what Weis and Hickman have done here, and I've never seen them succeed, in craft or in storytelling. In brief recall, I only see Tolkien and Martin as being better at evoking a fantastic world and its inhabitants, although I grant that the latter authors are on a whole higher level. Weis and Hickman are on a lower level, but perhaps masters of the upper-middle (or lower-high?) echelon. This book completely surprised me. I wasn't expecting much. But before even finished it, I went out directly to buy 2 and 3; I needed them on hand. I thought this would be a casual read, but it turned into much more.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bahia

    I picked this up used for a friend and decided to read it before I gave it to him. Weis and Hickman are supposed to be some of the best writers in the Dragonlance series, but I was not impressed. They tell, but don't show, overuse words (never seen the word "restive" used more in a book), and this book should have been significantly shorter. It had been a long time since I'd read any of the Dragonlance novels and I didn't particularly mind that you were supposed to be familiar with the world to I picked this up used for a friend and decided to read it before I gave it to him. Weis and Hickman are supposed to be some of the best writers in the Dragonlance series, but I was not impressed. They tell, but don't show, overuse words (never seen the word "restive" used more in a book), and this book should have been significantly shorter. It had been a long time since I'd read any of the Dragonlance novels and I didn't particularly mind that you were supposed to be familiar with the world to know the context of this one, but this book was nothing special with characters I didn't particularly care about. About halfway through it picked up a lot so I did give the next two books in the trilogy a chance, but once I finished the trilogy I pretty much decided to give Dragonlance a pass in the future.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jasher Drake

    First off, this is VERY different from all the previous Dragonlance books I have read, and when I say different, I mean DIFFERENT. The world that I once knew has been completely tuned upside down. The government has changed, the laws have changed, the factions have changed, heck, even the land itself has been changed. All of the familiar characters have been completely changed as well. Palin, for one, used to be all heart but now, he is turning into what his uncle Raistlin turned into, deceiving First off, this is VERY different from all the previous Dragonlance books I have read, and when I say different, I mean DIFFERENT. The world that I once knew has been completely tuned upside down. The government has changed, the laws have changed, the factions have changed, heck, even the land itself has been changed. All of the familiar characters have been completely changed as well. Palin, for one, used to be all heart but now, he is turning into what his uncle Raistlin turned into, deceiving, angry, and hateful. Now, everything that I just said is why most people hate the books, but I gotta say that it made me enjoy the experience even more. It opened my eyes to just how real this world is, and how everything can be changed with a few small mistakes. So yeah. This book is awesome! And it even introduced a new favorite character to me, Mina.

  18. 5 out of 5

    A.M. Reynwood

    Wow. I had to take a moment and a deep breath after this one. This trilogy took me (I'm a little embarrassed to admit) several months to finish. Each volume is so big it could break a foot if you dropped it. This is a very intricate story with many threads woven to make a fine mesh tapestry. I have been interested in the universe of DragonLance for a long time, and my very first venture into the world of Krynn was the Suncatcher Trilogy by Jeff Sampson (which I'm thinking of reading again, becau Wow. I had to take a moment and a deep breath after this one. This trilogy took me (I'm a little embarrassed to admit) several months to finish. Each volume is so big it could break a foot if you dropped it. This is a very intricate story with many threads woven to make a fine mesh tapestry. I have been interested in the universe of DragonLance for a long time, and my very first venture into the world of Krynn was the Suncatcher Trilogy by Jeff Sampson (which I'm thinking of reading again, because Sindri). I fell in love with the race of kender, which are kind of like hobbits, but not really. Then I brought this War of Souls Trilogy into my collection and decided to give it a whirl. My first impression after diving into the first volume was that I would have benefitted exponentially from reading its predecessor series first, as there are many people, places, and events mentioned and alluded to that bear some significance. Albeit the authors did a fair job adding enough detail to give a novice (such as I am) some understanding to keep me from being totally lost, but in the future I would advise starting at the very beginning, because that's a very good place to start. I jumped into an ocean with this DragonLance stuff, because while there are numerous (and I mean numerous) series and trilogies encompassing individual stories, they're all strung up along the timeline of this world of Krynn, which opens with Dragons of Autumn Twilight, first in the Chronicles Trilogy by Weis and Hickman. So, before you dive into the War of Souls, be smarter than yours truly and start in the beginning instead of somewhere in the middle. Now, that said, I have to admit I have some mixed feelings about this story. Overall in the grand scheme of things I enjoyed it, but it was the ending that sold it to me. I love me a good ending (I'm not saying anything more about that, because a spoiled ending is the worst). I had some trouble getting there, though, because it took so very long. We follow a bucket load of people scattered across the continent dealing with the myriad of happenings, and to be honest, I really only cared about Tasselhoff's happenings (poor, poor, loveable Tas. I'd read Dragons of an Autumn Twilight just for him). I favored Gerard's bits, too, but those two were my only real favorites. The overarching theme of this One God seriously creeped me out in the beginning, when I couldn't decide if it was a good or bad thing. The details were so conflicting (which is good storytelling, leaving the reader in the same shoes as the characters as they try to figure out what to think of it). I'm going to spoil that for you and say that it is most certainly a bad thing. There wouldn't be much of a story if it had turned out to be a good one. Such is life. Anywho, the diversity of the characters and their varying personalities gives a wide perspective of what's going on, what it means to the world as a whole, and how it affects/will affect the individuals in it. One thing is for certain, not a single person will be the same. Trials can stretch and grow or shatter and destroy. Tas learned about fear and true bravery, Odila found her way through the mire of a troubled heart, Gilthas fought through the pain and responsibility of kingship to lead an exiled people. Mina succumbed to darkness. Mina is a curiosity for me. Duly mysterious in the beginning, we learned very little about her throughout the story. Outside of her unswerving faith in her One God, she has almost no personality. Her initial impression is one of a capable leader and miracle worker filled with kindness and compassion for everyone, including her enemies, so long as they recognize the One God whom she serves. Then come to find out towards the end that this 'innocent' youth isn't as kindhearted as we've been led to believe. I know that stress and pain can alter a person, but I would think that such a compassionate person would hesitate a little more before doing what she did, might waver a little in the face of the dark truth. But maybe it was all a farce to begin with. An act. Devotion to her god turned this inquisitive girl into a devout pawn and then a bitter and vengeful creature. It would be interesting to see what happens with this new bane in the followup series, The Dark Disciple. Story aside, I thought the narrative had good points and not so good points. It was wonderfully descriptive, painting vivid pictures, but there were times when I thought this exposition or that one wasn't entirely necessary for the development of the plot. I also found a boatload of typos, but it's not like that ruined the experience for me. The pace was moderate for the most part, kind of slow at times (which is one of the reasons it took me so long to finish, I rarely felt the insufferable need to read more at the soonest opportunity). But it got better in the last three or four hundred pages, keeping me up too late. All in all I'd say it was a good addition to the DragonLance world, certainly enough to convince me to go back and read from the first.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Crimson

    This was actually the first Dragonlance book I read, way back in 2001. It was the third fantasy series I had ever read, and at the time I loved this novel. I was expecting to hate this novel in my recent reread (as I did the hopelessly derivative and dull Chronicles trilogy), but I was actually left somewhat impressed. The world Margaret Weis constructs here is a considerably more interesting Krynn than in Legends or Chronicles, and we follow a far more interesting cast. Gerard, Silvanoshei, and This was actually the first Dragonlance book I read, way back in 2001. It was the third fantasy series I had ever read, and at the time I loved this novel. I was expecting to hate this novel in my recent reread (as I did the hopelessly derivative and dull Chronicles trilogy), but I was actually left somewhat impressed. The world Margaret Weis constructs here is a considerably more interesting Krynn than in Legends or Chronicles, and we follow a far more interesting cast. Gerard, Silvanoshei, and Palin, in particular, are far more interesting and well developed than any of the characters (excluding Raistlin) in the original trilogy. The setting has potential. The Gods have abandoned Krynn, and for much of the book we follow, through the eyes of other characters, the mysterious young girl Mina claiming to represent a new God. A mature exploration of belief would be a perfect theme for this book to be rooted in, but alas, this is ultimately pretty standard high fantasy and we don't really get any of that.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    A return to form for Weis and Hickman. After the pretty disastrous Dragons of a Summer Flame, Fallen Sun picks up the remnants of that book and delivers an intriguing mystery. One in which the gods have left the world of Krynn, but maybe not? The book introduces a new character, Mina, who follows a nameless God and can perform miracles. There's also the return of Tasslehoff Burrfoot which may or may not be a good thing for certain readers. The characters here are way more inspired and have more d A return to form for Weis and Hickman. After the pretty disastrous Dragons of a Summer Flame, Fallen Sun picks up the remnants of that book and delivers an intriguing mystery. One in which the gods have left the world of Krynn, but maybe not? The book introduces a new character, Mina, who follows a nameless God and can perform miracles. There's also the return of Tasslehoff Burrfoot which may or may not be a good thing for certain readers. The characters here are way more inspired and have more depth than the Summer Flame. There may be one too many characters because the book does lose focus on a couple characters - mainly Gilthas & Palin - but the book is just the first in a trilogy. So if you plan on reading this book, you'll want to read the others because it does leave everyone in jeopardy.

  21. 4 out of 5

    João Batista

    This could get 4*... but it became slow and monotonous, even, as I progressed. A first chapter, though, to congeal blood of any reader. Do kender die of boredom or unhappiness? ... A mysterious girl with powers from a dark god: what does she want? And after 100 pages, the quest itself, starting with a kender and a knight. Best passages, of course, when the kender shows up. A blind beggar ... or Guardian, dear metalheads \,,/? The characters here want to find out if there's a better, peaceful futur This could get 4*... but it became slow and monotonous, even, as I progressed. A first chapter, though, to congeal blood of any reader. Do kender die of boredom or unhappiness? ... A mysterious girl with powers from a dark god: what does she want? And after 100 pages, the quest itself, starting with a kender and a knight. Best passages, of course, when the kender shows up. A blind beggar ... or Guardian, dear metalheads \,,/? The characters here want to find out if there's a better, peaceful future... based upon a kender's tale.... Magic is nowhere to be found, but the girl Mina works her 'miracles' in the name of her true God. And then, the sun has fallen... A bit of revision would always help. Quotes: "Every time you break a promise, your heart breaks a little..." "The fate of the world in the hands of a kender".

  22. 5 out of 5

    Geoff Battle

    Fallen Sun is a long book and after the initial opening event it takes a while to get going. The action is spread across Krynn, involving the forces of good and evil, with all races being followed. It's this depth that makes Fallen Sun a little hard going at times. It seems 'The War of Souls' is set in an alternate reality to the previous Dragons series, with all the characters flawed, cursed or downtrodden in some way - there is little warmth and joy in this volume. So, enter this trilogy with Fallen Sun is a long book and after the initial opening event it takes a while to get going. The action is spread across Krynn, involving the forces of good and evil, with all races being followed. It's this depth that makes Fallen Sun a little hard going at times. It seems 'The War of Souls' is set in an alternate reality to the previous Dragons series, with all the characters flawed, cursed or downtrodden in some way - there is little warmth and joy in this volume. So, enter this trilogy with the knowledge that Weis & Hickman have turned the previous series on its head - it's no 'rinse and repeat' approach to the Dragonlance series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marco Hoogh

    I think that I rated this book four stars, simply out of my love for the original Dragonlance Cronicles. Nostalgia does paint our perspective. I think it must have been twenty years between the first series and this follow-up, and I could not wait to read more about Tanis, Caramon, Tasslehof and Raistlin of course. These were unforgettable characters from my youth, who captured an eternal spot in my memory. It made diving into the war of souls something done without second thought, or regard to I think that I rated this book four stars, simply out of my love for the original Dragonlance Cronicles. Nostalgia does paint our perspective. I think it must have been twenty years between the first series and this follow-up, and I could not wait to read more about Tanis, Caramon, Tasslehof and Raistlin of course. These were unforgettable characters from my youth, who captured an eternal spot in my memory. It made diving into the war of souls something done without second thought, or regard to hidden dangers. Like expectations...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Bylicki

    Solid writing from Weis & Hickman, but it's really hard to get behind this "new" Dragonlance. The Chronicles were an incredible series, but the finale in the form of Dragons of Summer Flame absolutely nerve-wrecking. Also, The War of Souls series is very depressing. Everything seems to be falling apart, old and loved characters dying or suffering from crippling disabilities, etc. Solid writing from Weis & Hickman, but it's really hard to get behind this "new" Dragonlance. The Chronicles were an incredible series, but the finale in the form of Dragons of Summer Flame absolutely nerve-wrecking. Also, The War of Souls series is very depressing. Everything seems to be falling apart, old and loved characters dying or suffering from crippling disabilities, etc.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Almustafa Couch

    A really enjoyable book, a good third trilogy (the reading of the previous two is useful for providing the framework, back story necessary for the easy comprehension of this particular novel) though it is possible to read this alone. Behind all the brilliantly written fight scenes is the issue of the classic "Time Travel Paradox".

  26. 4 out of 5

    Long

    Ok, it is the first volume of a trilogy, but 600 pages of setting the scene for the next volume is quite a lot. However, after reading this most people probably want to read the next volume too... My ability to imagine may not be the same as 20 years ago, because parts of the story felt a bit too far out.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    Easy fantasy read. I used to enjoy the stories more when I was younger, but I'm unfortunately not as invested in the characters and world anymore. I plan to eventually finish the trilogy but will probably no longer seek out Weis & Hickman novels. Easy fantasy read. I used to enjoy the stories more when I was younger, but I'm unfortunately not as invested in the characters and world anymore. I plan to eventually finish the trilogy but will probably no longer seek out Weis & Hickman novels.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    It was fun. It just feels hokie at times. I think I'm so conditioned to LOTR. This series was wonderful as a teen. I will still stick with this trilogy but I think it will just be because of nostolgia.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    Requires having read Dragons of Summer Flame and some Tales shorts to make sense. Feels like an alternate timeline for Dragonlance. Didn't like the pacing or the characters, who mostly felt like bit parts.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cliff Townsend

    I missed the series before this unfortunately but this has been an interesting twist in the Krynn evolution.

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