counter create hit Neither a Hawk nor a Dove: An Insider's Account of Pakistan's Foreign Policy - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Neither a Hawk nor a Dove: An Insider's Account of Pakistan's Foreign Policy

Availability: Ready to download

books


Compare
Ads Banner

books

30 review for Neither a Hawk nor a Dove: An Insider's Account of Pakistan's Foreign Policy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sameed

    TLDR: This book presents the government's version of history which is more fiction than fact. K. M. Kasuri, is the quintessential Pakistani establishment. Throughout this book, has tried to absolve the Pakistani Armed forces for the failure of the peace negotiation process with India. The author has deliberately ignored the plethora of evidence which indicates Pakistan's complicity in the Mumbai attacks. The entire book has tried to deliberately ignore facts and has tried to paint a picture of th TLDR: This book presents the government's version of history which is more fiction than fact. K. M. Kasuri, is the quintessential Pakistani establishment. Throughout this book, has tried to absolve the Pakistani Armed forces for the failure of the peace negotiation process with India. The author has deliberately ignored the plethora of evidence which indicates Pakistan's complicity in the Mumbai attacks. The entire book has tried to deliberately ignore facts and has tried to paint a picture of the Pakistani leadership which is not accurate in the slightest. The author has had close relations with multiple high ranking officers in the Pakistan army. And remains committed to the what Hussain Haqqani calls "magnificent delusions". The author has repeatedly asserted that the top brass of the armed forces is committed to peace with India yet facts, such as the recent Dawn Leaks, tell us a very different story. Mr. Kasuri also contends that during Gen. Pervaiz Musharraf's rule Pakistan was truly committed to the war on terror. He also believes that the Taliban insurgency was/is indigenous. Needless to say, the arguments and opinions presented in this book could not be further from the truth. The author might as well have written fiction.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hemant Kanakia

    I wished Mr. Kasturia had taken time to do a better job of writing about these years he was Foreign Secretary. There is too much of 'I' on each page. It would have been better if he had put some distance, stop being an actor and more of an observer. At times, it reads like a very jaundiced view of the history. He is certainly explaining Pakistani elite point of view. Nor does he miss chance of telling the prod that Pakistan is so eager for peace, but, then he glosses over obstacles created by it I wished Mr. Kasturia had taken time to do a better job of writing about these years he was Foreign Secretary. There is too much of 'I' on each page. It would have been better if he had put some distance, stop being an actor and more of an observer. At times, it reads like a very jaundiced view of the history. He is certainly explaining Pakistani elite point of view. Nor does he miss chance of telling the prod that Pakistan is so eager for peace, but, then he glosses over obstacles created by its own military and ISI's complicity in creating terrorist framework and supporting the use of terror as a weapon to fight battles - the battle that variously describes as just and battle of liberation of Kashmir. Yet, there is little of views of what Kashmiris want that is coming thru in his narrative. There also appears nothing new in formulae for peace that he claims can be achieved. Much deeper understanding of Pakistan and what shapes its foreign policies is to be gained by reading the book - the Pakistan paradox - by Christophe Jeffrelot. I read that book first and then I started on this one and quickly got bored. Abandoned it after 250 pages.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bredo Erichsen

    After reading 1/7 it seems very good. All is seen from a Pakistan angel, but I will read other books later to get a second opinion

  4. 5 out of 5

    Manoj Chacko

    This book is a very easy read compared to Jaswants Sinhas 'Jinnah' or Shashi Tharoors 'Pax India'. There are many punch lines and statements that are monotonously repeated that you wonder if you are re-reading the chapter, perhaps the benchmark set by the above authors waters down the literary quality of Khurshid's writings. Though the central focus in the book is about India-Pakistan political relationship it also touches on the similarities between both the countries, how hazy the border really This book is a very easy read compared to Jaswants Sinhas 'Jinnah' or Shashi Tharoors 'Pax India'. There are many punch lines and statements that are monotonously repeated that you wonder if you are re-reading the chapter, perhaps the benchmark set by the above authors waters down the literary quality of Khurshid's writings. Though the central focus in the book is about India-Pakistan political relationship it also touches on the similarities between both the countries, how hazy the border really is and also how complex politics in general is. The world is so interconnected and interdependent and any shift in balance causes major repercussions in unexpected areas. Kasuri has bared some bones on the games Indian politicians play while being very diplomatic in revealing the dirty secrets of Pakistan politics. (This is understandable as we know what happened after Jaswant book and after Advani spoke positively about Jinnah). There is also a surprising omission on references to Indira Gandhi while most other PM from Nehru onwards are recalled. Its a good book to get a perspective from the other side of the fence and also understand some of the challenges Pakistan faces in their other boarders as well. Its also interesting to read Khurshid acknowledging Pakistan teaching incorrect history in school books which ends up with them having no cultural legacy of their own. It also sets you thinking on what the reality is as most of us are also conditioned by doctored news, social media propaganda and expert analysis, perhaps no one really knows the reality, maybe not even the rulers of both the countries in the end you have to really think who is actually ruling the countries as well!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deepanker Kaul

    Find my full review at deepankerkaul.blogspot.in/2016/12/rev... Find my full review at deepankerkaul.blogspot.in/2016/12/rev...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Zahid Ramzan

    I liked the name to begin with, it is a good book for Indo-Pak readers.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Yassar

    Worth reading books. It explicitly contains all the factors relating to foreign affairs of pakistan especially . Kashmir problem its cause and solution both are deliberately discussed by Khurshid. The last chapter discuss and eradicate the myth that pak foreign policy is run by army. It also negate that we don’t have superior breed of diplomats, writer throw some light that how effectively our diplomats( foreign office) managed to kept kashmir issue alive for such a long time , it also highlight Worth reading books. It explicitly contains all the factors relating to foreign affairs of pakistan especially . Kashmir problem its cause and solution both are deliberately discussed by Khurshid. The last chapter discuss and eradicate the myth that pak foreign policy is run by army. It also negate that we don’t have superior breed of diplomats, writer throw some light that how effectively our diplomats( foreign office) managed to kept kashmir issue alive for such a long time , it also highlight the success of our foreign policy that pak was able to keep good relation with both china and US despite the fact that both were en during mao’s china.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Samran Salik

    The first couple of chapters are pretty boring but then it gets better. A lot of important information on Indo-Pak dialogue process and the Kashmir dispute.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Abdul Rehman

  10. 4 out of 5

    Balbir

  11. 4 out of 5

    SANDEEP DALAL

  12. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad

  13. 4 out of 5

    mayank shekhar tripathi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Duchess

  15. 4 out of 5

    انعم جاوید

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed Said

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kaustubh

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ameyavikrama Thanvi

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ashwani

  20. 4 out of 5

    Xing Lee

  21. 5 out of 5

    Khurram Gardezi

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amnah Amjad

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zinnia Maris

  24. 4 out of 5

    umesh suranagi

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sandeep Tyagi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anoop Kutty

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karim

  28. 4 out of 5

    Syed Irtaza Ali

  29. 4 out of 5

    M Saud

  30. 5 out of 5

    Utkarsh Singhania

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.