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Quarter Life Poetry: Poems for the Young, Broke and Hangry

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The creator of the popular Tumblr and Instagram "Quarter Life Poetry" tackles the real-life truths of work, money, sex, and many other challenges 20-somethings face in a laugh-out-loud collection of poetry. Samantha Jayne knows that life post-college isn't as glamorous as all undergrads think it's going to be... because she's currently living it. A graphic artist, Sam start The creator of the popular Tumblr and Instagram "Quarter Life Poetry" tackles the real-life truths of work, money, sex, and many other challenges 20-somethings face in a laugh-out-loud collection of poetry. Samantha Jayne knows that life post-college isn't as glamorous as all undergrads think it's going to be... because she's currently living it. A graphic artist, Sam started creating doodles and funny poems about her life as a 25-year-old. And when she decided to put them on Instagram, the captions were full of other people tagging friends and saying, "This is literally us." At a time where it seems like everyone around you is getting married, making more money than you do, and paying off their student loans, Sam's poetry captures the voice of millennials everywhere who know that being in your 20s can sometimes be the exact opposite of "the best years of your life."


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The creator of the popular Tumblr and Instagram "Quarter Life Poetry" tackles the real-life truths of work, money, sex, and many other challenges 20-somethings face in a laugh-out-loud collection of poetry. Samantha Jayne knows that life post-college isn't as glamorous as all undergrads think it's going to be... because she's currently living it. A graphic artist, Sam start The creator of the popular Tumblr and Instagram "Quarter Life Poetry" tackles the real-life truths of work, money, sex, and many other challenges 20-somethings face in a laugh-out-loud collection of poetry. Samantha Jayne knows that life post-college isn't as glamorous as all undergrads think it's going to be... because she's currently living it. A graphic artist, Sam started creating doodles and funny poems about her life as a 25-year-old. And when she decided to put them on Instagram, the captions were full of other people tagging friends and saying, "This is literally us." At a time where it seems like everyone around you is getting married, making more money than you do, and paying off their student loans, Sam's poetry captures the voice of millennials everywhere who know that being in your 20s can sometimes be the exact opposite of "the best years of your life."

30 review for Quarter Life Poetry: Poems for the Young, Broke and Hangry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scarlet Cameo

    The last couple of years i've been seeing as a tendency translate the "stand-up" comedy to the blogs and social networks, mostly in the form of comic strips. This lecture enters in that bag just with another format: poems. Let's be honest, if i must recommend this of course it won't be for his literary quality, because i can look this book like a compiled of tweets written in rhyme. Just i'm saying that, if you decided read this don't hope something deep and introspective, because if you're tryin The last couple of years i've been seeing as a tendency translate the "stand-up" comedy to the blogs and social networks, mostly in the form of comic strips. This lecture enters in that bag just with another format: poems. Let's be honest, if i must recommend this of course it won't be for his literary quality, because i can look this book like a compiled of tweets written in rhyme. Just i'm saying that, if you decided read this don't hope something deep and introspective, because if you're trying to find that...you're in the wrong book. The reason why i could say "Read it" is because is funny, of course there's a lot of things that are funny just for women, but when talks about money or job everyone can understand it, because when you are in your 20s you have the same thoughts and worries. I read it until i was waiting to be attended for the dr. and i laugh really hard a lot of times, but so many times i just thought "well, that's pathetic or a little maleness" (like when she spoke about wishing date with someone just to eat...that bothers me) is not so much, but the time when she said it i was like: At the end, if you follow this woman (i have no clue about who she is when i start this, i just find out with the little bio inserted at the end of the book) probably you would like it. If you like jokes about dating, dildos, sex, money, education, wishes...there's a chance you like it. If you don't like this kind of humor...you can find something better. A digital copy of this book was provided by NetGalley

  2. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Big thanks to NetGalley for my copy in exchange for an honest review. This is the sort of rhythmic verse I’d expect to find composed in the margins of uni lecture material, on the back of bar napkins, or the underside of a pizza box. A collection of musings and grumbles from our generation Y representative, 'Quarter Life Poetry' presents a series of stand-alone quatrains sorted into nine different categories and accompanied by some elementary abstract clip art. With themes like money, food, sex a Big thanks to NetGalley for my copy in exchange for an honest review. This is the sort of rhythmic verse I’d expect to find composed in the margins of uni lecture material, on the back of bar napkins, or the underside of a pizza box. A collection of musings and grumbles from our generation Y representative, 'Quarter Life Poetry' presents a series of stand-alone quatrains sorted into nine different categories and accompanied by some elementary abstract clip art. With themes like money, food, sex and unemployment, Jayne injects light-hearted amusement into the issues and gripes bearing down on first-world millennials. These poems are basically short anecdotes written with the aid of a rhyming dictionary and using a ‘Roses are red, Violets are blue…’ template. That’s not to say they don’t tickle a rib: ‘Let us all gather ‘round as we mourn side by side to commemorate the fateful day my metabolism died’ – p. 61 Samantha Jayne makes no pretence about her poetry, using a tone of disbelief to tell us how lazy, poor, bored, lost and helpless she feels. Her voice is sardonic and tinged with early-onset cynicism, making for a topical look at the very real struggles facing today’s young people (and in fact anyone who dreads going to work in the morning). Apparently, Jane started out using social media to share her childish prose, attaching the simple vibrant animations to further promote an aura of regression. 'Quarter Life Poetry' tells us why the 24-year-old author doesn’t want to deal with grown-up responsibility. Unemployment is possible, smug couples abound, money is elusive, and dating is a technological nightmare. I read the whole thing in less than an hour and while certainly no Keats or Hegley, it still made me smile. Student loans + dieting + share housing? This 30 year old can relate (in retrospect, I assure you). Follow me, blogstyle! -------> https://ponderdeeper.wordpress.com/20...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    "They say in your twenties each moment is priceless if each moment isn't an existential crisis."

  4. 4 out of 5

    PattyMacDotComma

    3.5★ It’s not Ogden Nash, (one of my all-time favourite poets) whose wonderful The Golden Trashery of Ogden Nashery and other books are disintegrating through wear and tear on my book shelf. But it’s fun. (Nash wrote the famous “Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker”.) I’ve also written a lot of verse myself in my time, good, bad, and doggerel, so I'm certainly familiar with the genre. If you’ve read the publisher’s blurb, you’ll see this is a collection of what the author has put together about l 3.5★ It’s not Ogden Nash, (one of my all-time favourite poets) whose wonderful The Golden Trashery of Ogden Nashery and other books are disintegrating through wear and tear on my book shelf. But it’s fun. (Nash wrote the famous “Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker”.) I’ve also written a lot of verse myself in my time, good, bad, and doggerel, so I'm certainly familiar with the genre. If you’ve read the publisher’s blurb, you’ll see this is a collection of what the author has put together about life after college (uni, tertiary education), and many poems have words referring to bodily parts or functions, which will make people laugh, of course, but which I probably should refrain from quoting. In the introduction, the author says her friends have said it’s a great bathroom book – a strange kind of praise, but I know exactly what they mean. It’s like a book of one-liners. You’re never going to remember them all, and you’ll probably get a kick out of them when you read them again. Each 4-line verse is accompanied by a cute drawing, which brightens it significantly and fills the pages. Without them, it would be pretty drab and very short. A few examples: A cartoon first-aid kit cartoon precedes: “In case of a catastrophe, I’ve made myself a kit. It’s essential for survival— so far there’s wine in it.” She surprises herself to find she’s grown up: “I nearly collapsed when I heard myself say, “I don’t understand the youth of today.” Then there’s the common desperation: “The other day I calculated costs to buy a home, and I deduced I can afford a nice big garden gnome.” At least the garden gnome that accompanies this verse is colourful and appealing. I’m sure she’s captured the mood of many educated 20-somethings who’ve supposedly made themselves employable but either haven’t managed to find the first happy rung on their ladder to success or realise the top of the ladder is further away than they were led to believe. I haven’t seen her Instagram or Tumblr pages, but I bet they’re popular, and this will be the sort of book that people will buy to give to friends. . . for the bathroom? https://www.instagram.com/quarterlife... Thanks to NetGalley and Grand Central Publishing for providing me with a copy for review. I'm quoting from that copy, so I apologise if any of these verses didn't make the final cut.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    Simple and brief, Samantha Jayne merges simple rhyming poetry with the realities of being in your mid-twenties and struggling with life. I'm only 19, but a lot of what she wrote about rang true to me. I guessed leaving for uni would be the time of my life, but the reality is that I have too much reading and the most exciting part of my week is the £4 bottle of wine from Sainsburys... Jayne manages to capture the realistic averageness of life, expected to be the most fun and exciting time you'll ev Simple and brief, Samantha Jayne merges simple rhyming poetry with the realities of being in your mid-twenties and struggling with life. I'm only 19, but a lot of what she wrote about rang true to me. I guessed leaving for uni would be the time of my life, but the reality is that I have too much reading and the most exciting part of my week is the £4 bottle of wine from Sainsburys... Jayne manages to capture the realistic averageness of life, expected to be the most fun and exciting time you'll ever have. Instead, you're struggling along with little money and for some reason, you're not so excited about going out anymore. Jobs are hard to come by and you're saddled with student debt. The truthfulness is stark, but funny, and it's an enjoyable set of poetry. As she says in her introduction, the perfect book to read while on the loo.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Marie

    accurate and witty and relatable. basically sums up a part of my feels because of adulthood. "FOOD" part was my favorite of all because it's the story of my life hahaha especially this piece: As a responsible adult, I must nourish myself with ice cream, chocolates, gummy bears, and corn chips from the shelf.

  7. 5 out of 5

    lauren ♡

    This was quite funny and pretty relatable, but it wasn't what I was expecting. I went in thinking this would be a similar style to the princess saves herself in this one or milk and honey, but it was just 4 lines of "joke-y" poems. Definitely still worth a read if you're in your mid 20s though!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elena ( The Queen Reads )

    Poetry form wise, it wasn't that good but damn these were witty poems. Haha! They were just too true it's sad. Love it! Really bathroom worthy read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    bookeshhh

    This book review appears on my blog. CLICK I will preface this review by thanking Grand Central Publishing and NetGalley for letting me read and review this book in exchange for an honest opinion. Today I saw a baby with such cuteness and grace, I thought, “aw, I want a baby”, but then I punched myself in the face. This collection of poetry as the title suggest about 25 year old’s and how unglamourous life can be. From one-night stands to money woes, she tries to capture the realities of life li This book review appears on my blog. CLICK I will preface this review by thanking Grand Central Publishing and NetGalley for letting me read and review this book in exchange for an honest opinion. Today I saw a baby with such cuteness and grace, I thought, “aw, I want a baby”, but then I punched myself in the face. This collection of poetry as the title suggest about 25 year old’s and how unglamourous life can be. From one-night stands to money woes, she tries to capture the realities of life living in this time. Samantha Jayne is a creator of the social media accounts of the same name. Jayne prefaced this book by saying this is a perfect book for when you are sitting in the toilet. I have to say that I agree. This is not a literary book whatsoever so don’t expect any of that. She does tackle relatable issues living as a 25 year old in this economic climate. The joblessness, food-obsession and dating life seemed somewhat familiar but it didn’t really hit me. There is no depth and reading this was just a way to kill time sitting in the toilet if you forgot to bring your mobile. I give this book 1.5 stars. FOLLOW ME: Instagram Twitter Blog

  10. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. I might be a little beyond the "quarter life" portion of my life in years, BUT I related to a lot of these poems so much. I think many people in their 20s & 30s will also relate. It was a quick read and the little pictures that accompanied the poems were also cute. Definitely would be a gift idea, something to put in a gift bag for someone who you think wo I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. I might be a little beyond the "quarter life" portion of my life in years, BUT I related to a lot of these poems so much. I think many people in their 20s & 30s will also relate. It was a quick read and the little pictures that accompanied the poems were also cute. Definitely would be a gift idea, something to put in a gift bag for someone who you think would appreciate it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Innah

    "I thought living the grown-up life would be so freakin' sweet. Instead I work and trudge on home to pass out, rinse, repeat." Right? Right? Indeed a light and fun read while seating on the toilet! Ha!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rayene Ziadi

    it was a light read that made me giggle from start to finish.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    A very cute read that I would proudly display on my toilet.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    This is so hilarious and relatable. I snapchatted a fair few of these because they hit right where it hurt.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Haley

    S’cute, though calling it poetry is a bit of a leap.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    So many passages made me go “omg this is me” even though I’m slightly older than twentysomething

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sofia Lima

    Even if I'm only 22, I laugh a lot with the book. It's really relatable and funny. And, of course, the illustrations are amazing (even if they're grey on Kindle).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stewart

    Oh gosh I found this "poetry" dreadful! I don't follow the blog and was unfamiliar with Samantha Jayne's rhymes before getting a free copy of the book from Netgalley. This book really reads more like a children's book of rhymes but for the young adult. I didn't find it especially funny and there was nothing intelligent at all about it. I don't consider myself a poetry snob by any means but this doesn't fit the bill for me. I could have done without it. Just potty jokes in the form of rhyme withou Oh gosh I found this "poetry" dreadful! I don't follow the blog and was unfamiliar with Samantha Jayne's rhymes before getting a free copy of the book from Netgalley. This book really reads more like a children's book of rhymes but for the young adult. I didn't find it especially funny and there was nothing intelligent at all about it. I don't consider myself a poetry snob by any means but this doesn't fit the bill for me. I could have done without it. Just potty jokes in the form of rhyme without a great hook.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    This was a quick and enjoyable read. As someone who is in there mid-twenties I was able to relate to the poems & found myself smiling while reading some of the poems. For anyone who is currently or has gone through the troubles of being in your mid-twenties you enjoy this read. This was a quick and enjoyable read. As someone who is in there mid-twenties I was able to relate to the poems & found myself smiling while reading some of the poems. For anyone who is currently or has gone through the troubles of being in your mid-twenties you enjoy this read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shana Karnes

    This was my own fault for not reading the synopsis better, but I thought it'd be an anthology of poems around this subject. Instead, it was a series of super short poems that were kind of funny but never made me actually laugh out loud.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda [Novel Addiction]

    Fast read, and definitely hilarious. Wish I had written down some of the poems before I returned it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    Funny little ditty kind of poetry. She says its a bathroom book and that is where I read most of it. She has a nice grasp of meter and wittiness, something this type of poetry sometimes lacks.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Spencer

    Even into my early thirties I still find this very relatable (is that sad?)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    This book is an example of a genre of poetry that seeks to capitalize on the suffering and general lack of life success found by many millennials who have been dealing with the problems of adulting.  This appears to have been written mainly in the Great Recession period, and features a lot of the sort of insufferable whining that one can expect from young adults who have clearly not mastered the skills that are necessary to thrive in contemporary society and who were overprotected by helicopter This book is an example of a genre of poetry that seeks to capitalize on the suffering and general lack of life success found by many millennials who have been dealing with the problems of adulting.  This appears to have been written mainly in the Great Recession period, and features a lot of the sort of insufferable whining that one can expect from young adults who have clearly not mastered the skills that are necessary to thrive in contemporary society and who were overprotected by helicopter parents who sabotaged their ability to cope with the problems of life.  That is not to say that this book of poems is worthless, for though they are rather slight as poems they are at least somewhat entertaining if one wants to laugh at the author (although not too much when the comments hit a bit close to home) rather than laughing with the author.  If someone is willing to troll themselves and their whole generation in exchange for having received enough money through printing a book of superficial poetry, I am not necessarily hostile to piling on to read it and critique it.   This particular book is about 150 pages long and contains poems about a variety of topics.  Each of the poems fills up about four lines or so on a page with a very basic but thematic drawing over it.  The author writes about such subject matter as routines, money, food, social life, sex, love, weddings, fashion, unemployment, and work.  The poems are not of a high quality and typically rely on very basic reversals and a low level of expectations when it comes to excellence in writing.  Still, this book seems more of an attempt at comedy in mining the loneliness of young people who go on Valentine's Day dates with their dildos and grouse about working for their stoner former classmates and who wonder why life isn't working out well for them than it is at writing anything approaching great poetry.  This book is no William Stafford slice of life from an insightful observer of life's absurdities, it should be remembered, but the attempts at humor from a not very perceptive person who is not aiming high with this particular collection. This book is really a downer, for all of its attempts at laughter, as it looks at the downside of life in one's 20's for people who have not found luck at love and who struggle to feed themselves and find work with dignity and promise.  To be sure, this book does not demonstrate a high degree of excellence as a poet, but as a tryout for some sort of YouTube or other social media commentary gig or some attempts at humor writing, this book does a better job at mining the suffering of love for lulz.  I wish the author had been a better poet as this book would have been easier to recommend, but whoever did the drawings did a good job at adding the right element of immaturity and early reader quality to it.  It should be admitted that this book is not for everyone; it is highly crude at parts and even at best it is whiny and cynical, and that is not going to be to everyone's taste.  Still, a broke and not very talented millennial poet has to make a living somehow, right?  If this book helps keep at least a few millennials amused in the face of life's troubles, and keeps its poet from starving, it will not be a total waste.

  25. 5 out of 5

    OpenBookSociety.com

    http://openbooksociety.com/article/qu... Quarter Life Poetry: Poems for the Young, Broke and Hangry By Samantha Jayne ISBN: 9781455565283 Author Website: http://www.samanthajayne.tv/ Brought to you by OBS reviewer Caro Synopsis: Samantha Jayne knows that life post-college isn’t as glamorous as all undergrads think it’s going to be… because she’s currently living it. A graphic artist, Sam started creating doodles and funny poems about her life as a 25-year-old. And when she decided to put them on Instag http://openbooksociety.com/article/qu... Quarter Life Poetry: Poems for the Young, Broke and Hangry By Samantha Jayne ISBN: 9781455565283 Author Website: http://www.samanthajayne.tv/ Brought to you by OBS reviewer Caro Synopsis: Samantha Jayne knows that life post-college isn’t as glamorous as all undergrads think it’s going to be… because she’s currently living it. A graphic artist, Sam started creating doodles and funny poems about her life as a 25-year-old. And when she decided to put them on Instagram, the captions were full of other people tagging friends and saying, “This is literally us.” At a time where it seems like everyone around you is getting married, making more money than you do, and paying off their student loans, Sam’s poetry captures the voice of millennials everywhere who know that being in your 20s can sometimes be the exact opposite of “the best years of your life.” Review: Quarter Life Poetry: Poems for the Young, Broke and Hangry is a poetry book that captures perfectly the minds of people of any age going through a similar situation out there in the grown up world. Readers can easily relate to one, two, or all of the poems, and their funny illustrations that go from a bad apartment to Friday nights in sweatpants. Events like these ones, is what readers will find in this humorous book of the Quarter Life Poetry: Poems for the Young, Broke and Hangry. The book is categorized in the different struggles of life such as routines, money, food, social life, and more. Each struggle has several poems and an illustration to go with it to exemplify the words in a comical way. They express the struggles one goes through after college, like trying to find the dream job, dealing with people, and even trying to stay fit. What author Samantha Jayne didn’t expect was to have other people relate to her day-to-day life experiences. I really liked the poems, they’re short and sarcastic, and their illustrations are simple and cute. Some of the things that the author talks about I can definitely relate to, like getting all excited when receiving mail to find out it’s all bills. “A tragic part of postgrad life is no student ID. It was my golden ticket to getting s**t free.” All in all, Quarter Life Poetry: Poems for the Young, Broke and Hangry is the perfect book for a quick read and a good time. Especially, when you realize you’re not the only one out there going to a quarter life crisis.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    The central idea of the poetry book “Quarter Life Poetry, Poems for the young, broke & hangry” written by Samantha Jayne, is that post-college isn’t as glamorous as most people think. Ms. Jayne knows what this life is like, because she’s living it right now. Sam, began creating doodles and funny poems about her #struggle to share with her friends on Instagram. To her surprise, these poems were found and liked by twentysomethings all around the world. And now, are inside this book that she wrote. The central idea of the poetry book “Quarter Life Poetry, Poems for the young, broke & hangry” written by Samantha Jayne, is that post-college isn’t as glamorous as most people think. Ms. Jayne knows what this life is like, because she’s living it right now. Sam, began creating doodles and funny poems about her #struggle to share with her friends on Instagram. To her surprise, these poems were found and liked by twentysomethings all around the world. And now, are inside this book that she wrote. Samantha Jayne uses two types of figurative devices throughout her book, imagery and an every-other-line pattern. Every single poem in her book is only four lines in length. Not only that but also, the second and last line of each poem either rhyme, or slant rhyme in some way. Each poem also comes with a comedic doodle/drawing, which is used to explain each poem visually in some way. For example, let’s take the poem on page 50, where in she talks about how she has gained weight, and doesn’t care. The poem goes “This bump in my belly/ will not need a crib;/ for it’s not a baby,/ but for baby back ribs.”. This poem is accompanied with a picture of a very large, especially in the belly area, women’s shirt. I thought this book was a great laugh filled with dark and relatable humor. When I heard that we had to do a poetry book for our book report for April, I was not excited. I thought I was going to be stuck reading some old Shakespearean language novel that was both not interesting and too long. Then, I found this book. It took me only an hour to read this thing from cover to cover, and that hour was filled me trying to silence my laughter so I wouldn’t draw attention to myself in public. Right from the get go, first poem of the book is about how the author feels about taking care of life. It has a picture of a sad dead cactus and goes “My friend has a baby/ and own a boutique./ I just bought a cactus;/ it died in a week.” However, I have to say that this book was much more mature than I thought it was going to be. Dropping F-bombs and talking about “Bedroom” talk, this is definitely meant for the college students and older. Still I don’t regret reading this book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Juhee

    All youth, who think you are extraordinary (or weird), it’s okay. Actually, we all think we are the center of the earth. Oh yeah! Struggle is real. I think we might have been born to struggle. But, what makes me feel better is that at least this book is talking about a “Quarter” of our life which is 25/100=¼ which is our youth, our burning days: all the obstacles, all the small worries and happiness. It’s all about the thing we have already been through, currently in middle of the situation, or All youth, who think you are extraordinary (or weird), it’s okay. Actually, we all think we are the center of the earth. Oh yeah! Struggle is real. I think we might have been born to struggle. But, what makes me feel better is that at least this book is talking about a “Quarter” of our life which is 25/100=¼ which is our youth, our burning days: all the obstacles, all the small worries and happiness. It’s all about the thing we have already been through, currently in middle of the situation, or we will be going to go through. This book applies to me; I feel like I can project myself in this book. This book makes me feel like even though I struggle, it’s okay, because that is just part of youth. Poems in this book makes me feel like one topic and short story. This book is hyper realistic. Poems in this book literally reflect ourselves.This book use a lot of rhyming and sarcasm jokes. All poem in this book brings a lot of imagery. Because this book use a lot of creative draws that help us we can connect the poem and our experience. But this book also use symbolism too. Because it criticize our lifestyle too. In the poem in the chapter Money, In the poem in the chapter Money, I don’t need to exercise ‘cause i already sweat When i contemplate the dept Of my student loan debt. Especially this kind of poem bring our age’s sympathy. This is the things make this book creative. I hate school English class when they makes me to analyze what is the thing, imply in tiny tiny verse. Which is no sympathy to me. I thought this is why people hate to read poems. When you being super strict picky reader and trying to conquer the poem. It reduce actual fun of read poems. But this book is literally can be me. I finish this book really fast and i really enjoyed it. Even i read author's Instagram sun-dance interviews video and short clip video about poems in this book. This book really soak in inside of the poem. It did really good job to express our ‘Quarter’ zone people's real life and our emotion. I recommend for all of us so those who want to struggle better.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shoola Oyindamola

    Quarter Life Poetry is a collection filled with spontaneous fun and humor. Through creatively written poems, the author, Samantha Jayne discusses how some of her expectations for the quarter life (age 25) have not been met. She writes with the least expected melancholy and with much sarcasm that allows a young reader (around the 25 years age range) to view life and problems from a different perspective. She slides in didactic lines where necessary and the moral lessons are hard to miss. In quarte Quarter Life Poetry is a collection filled with spontaneous fun and humor. Through creatively written poems, the author, Samantha Jayne discusses how some of her expectations for the quarter life (age 25) have not been met. She writes with the least expected melancholy and with much sarcasm that allows a young reader (around the 25 years age range) to view life and problems from a different perspective. She slides in didactic lines where necessary and the moral lessons are hard to miss. In quarter life poetry you find poems about finances: student loans, to be precise. In a poem for example, she writes about how her Alma Mater requests that she donates. She points to the irony of the situation as she mentions that it will be more helpful if the Alma Mater donates to her instead, for her to pay her student loans. You will also find poems about relationships, friendships, the body, and hobbies. In another poem, she mentions that she feels bloated and very uneasy which suggests that she may be pregnant, when in reality, all her body needed to do was fart. Samantha's writing style and illustrations are unique. This book is very daring and it challenges many preconceptions about poetry and the quarter life. This distinguishable level at which Samantha writes is one I hope for many writers who aim to have a wide network of readers. Most importantly her poems are simple and easy to relate with, even if the reader lacks the experience of whatever is written. The most fascinating part is that all the poems in the book are 4 lines each, which is rare and this prevents ramblings or loss of the readers attention while reading the book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    The narrator is the main point of the poem. She narrates her life as she goes throughout college and splits her early college life into 10 sections, each with their own points. First she starts off with her routine and about how her everyday life works with her and her roommate. Then goes into money and how it is hard to manage it, spend wisely, and explains all her money problems. Then goes into food, her social life, her love life, and after college which is finding work and a spouse. In the bo The narrator is the main point of the poem. She narrates her life as she goes throughout college and splits her early college life into 10 sections, each with their own points. First she starts off with her routine and about how her everyday life works with her and her roommate. Then goes into money and how it is hard to manage it, spend wisely, and explains all her money problems. Then goes into food, her social life, her love life, and after college which is finding work and a spouse. In the book, each page is only 4 lines. However, there are pictures to help establish an image of what she is talking about. The whole book pretty much symbolizes how hard life by herself is and how getting used to college life isn’t very easy. You could imply that she’s telling you to not take time before college for granted because she keeps whining about her life now. Most of the pages have the second and fourth lines rhyming which creates a nice pattern for you to follow along to and flow with through the book. This book is hella messed up. I don’t even know what the heck she’s trying to establish. There really isn’t no point to the book and she is just ranting on about her life and how terrible it is. The poems in each section aren’t really well written or eye catching. I really liked how the book flowed and how it was an easy read and seemed like a children's book although the topics it covered were definitely not for a children's book. Overall, I didn’t really like this book because it didn’t really have a point to it and was really boring to read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Considering this is a book of four-line poems, this took me a very, very long time to finish. I actually bought this in LAX before a 14.5 hour flight to Sydney (which wasn't my final destination) because it was the only thing I saw in the airport that appealed to me and I'd packed the only book I bought on my trip that I hadn't finished in my checked bags. I started reading it on the flight and put it down about 2/5 of the way in. Which should have given me a clue. So when I finally picked it up Considering this is a book of four-line poems, this took me a very, very long time to finish. I actually bought this in LAX before a 14.5 hour flight to Sydney (which wasn't my final destination) because it was the only thing I saw in the airport that appealed to me and I'd packed the only book I bought on my trip that I hadn't finished in my checked bags. I started reading it on the flight and put it down about 2/5 of the way in. Which should have given me a clue. So when I finally picked it up again today, I wasn't wowed. I wasn't entertained. A lot of the poems were relatable, but they didn't make me laugh. Just a 'huh, well that's my life right there' and the moved on to the next one. It would have taken me an extra 15 minutes on that flight to finish the book and never have to think about it again. My bad. *I reserve 1-star reviews for books that I absolutely despise and/or dnf'd (or wished I had). This didn't quite deserve a 1-star, but my life wouldn't have been negatively impacted had I not read it.

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