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What if you could live forever? Defy death itself? Even now, scientific advances in regenerative medicine, life extension, cryonics, cybernetics, and in other areas have brought humans to the brink of solving life's final conundrum. In this volume of the acclaimed ‘Future Chronicles’ anthology series, twelve authors imagine that uninterrupted journey, confronting not just What if you could live forever? Defy death itself? Even now, scientific advances in regenerative medicine, life extension, cryonics, cybernetics, and in other areas have brought humans to the brink of solving life's final conundrum. In this volume of the acclaimed ‘Future Chronicles’ anthology series, twelve authors imagine that uninterrupted journey, confronting not just how, but what it means when human life can continue indefinitely, invulnerable, immortal. “The Immortality Chronicles” features stories by award-winning scientist and author E.E. Giorgi (Chimeras), Amazon bestselling author Will Swardstrom (Contact Window) and ten more of today's most visionary authors in science and speculative fiction.


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What if you could live forever? Defy death itself? Even now, scientific advances in regenerative medicine, life extension, cryonics, cybernetics, and in other areas have brought humans to the brink of solving life's final conundrum. In this volume of the acclaimed ‘Future Chronicles’ anthology series, twelve authors imagine that uninterrupted journey, confronting not just What if you could live forever? Defy death itself? Even now, scientific advances in regenerative medicine, life extension, cryonics, cybernetics, and in other areas have brought humans to the brink of solving life's final conundrum. In this volume of the acclaimed ‘Future Chronicles’ anthology series, twelve authors imagine that uninterrupted journey, confronting not just how, but what it means when human life can continue indefinitely, invulnerable, immortal. “The Immortality Chronicles” features stories by award-winning scientist and author E.E. Giorgi (Chimeras), Amazon bestselling author Will Swardstrom (Contact Window) and ten more of today's most visionary authors in science and speculative fiction.

30 review for The Immortality Chronicles

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Luhman

    This is a wonderful collection of shorts, with each one posing a few new and some old questions on immortality. Is living eternal a goal or a debasement of the meaning of life? Will the change make human life better or render its beauty a perversion. I especially liked The Control, by: Will Swardstrom, The Backup, by: Patricia Gilliam, and A Severance of Souls, by: Drew Avera. In The Control, I liked the action through historical events, and how the ancient alien concept was incorporated into t This is a wonderful collection of shorts, with each one posing a few new and some old questions on immortality. Is living eternal a goal or a debasement of the meaning of life? Will the change make human life better or render its beauty a perversion. I especially liked The Control, by: Will Swardstrom, The Backup, by: Patricia Gilliam, and A Severance of Souls, by: Drew Avera. In The Control, I liked the action through historical events, and how the ancient alien concept was incorporated into the story. It was a great character arch to see the young mind of the protagonist fooled in the beginning, but growing over time to develop and find his free will. It was well paced and I was satisfied with the ending. Patricia Gilliam’s The Backup, was a page turner. There were many interesting twists within just a few short pages, and I was quickly drawn into the story. I felt emotionally tied to unexpected deaths, and even the injury of the family pet. I want to know more about the assassins, pre programed weapons, and the motivation behind it all. In Drew Avera’s A Severance of Souls, I think it hit on one of the key aspects of immortality: Is it worth having if we are alone? Is it better to face an end with people you love, than run after the laurels and achievements of work pursuits? Rememorations, by: Paul B. Kohler, was another story that stood out. Memory and the human brain is still something scientists are working to understand. How would massive memory loss affect our present life? I liked this exploration of what would happen if part of our history were taken away? Would reoccurring memory loss be a worthy cost to becoming immortal? I’m not a fan of multiple flashbacks as a narrative, but I enjoyed how they were used in this story. It was appropriate for the decision making process presented to the protagonist. Overall they were all well done, with a variety of voices and styles providing lots of ideas and questions to ponder.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    Many of these stories focus on an individual who's rendered non-dying, but some apply the concept more broadly: D.K. Cassidy's "Room 42," and Thomas Robbins' "Eternity Today" are riffs on the entire human race's sudden conversion to undying status. E.E. Giorgi's heart-wrenching story "The House on the Cliff" tells of a man made immortal by means of his own cancer cells. "Legacy," by David Bruns, describes a driven CEO's effort to live forever by replacing himself with bionic parts over the cours Many of these stories focus on an individual who's rendered non-dying, but some apply the concept more broadly: D.K. Cassidy's "Room 42," and Thomas Robbins' "Eternity Today" are riffs on the entire human race's sudden conversion to undying status. E.E. Giorgi's heart-wrenching story "The House on the Cliff" tells of a man made immortal by means of his own cancer cells. "Legacy," by David Bruns, describes a driven CEO's effort to live forever by replacing himself with bionic parts over the course of centuries. "Rememorations," by Paul B. Kohler limits his protagonist's immortal status to his ability to pay for it--and his willingness to forget pieces of his past. And John Gregory Hancock's "The Antares Cigar Shoppe" stood out for the old school A.E. Van Vogt vibe that it brought to the table. But the award for Most Unintentionally Horrifying Story About Immortality has to go to Gareth Foy, who penned “The Essence of Jaime’s Father.” This piece manages to be the most abstract yet gut-wrenching bit of work in this volume, and I'm not entirely sure how Foy pulled it off. I'm not even sure he intended to do this. All I know is that this story opened up a pit of despair in my soul that I generally only feel when engaged in Facebook discussions about religion and foreign policy. In a nutshell, Jaime is a young man experiencing the beginning of Earth' death throes, as the sun expands to swallow the inner solar system. Science has bought the Earth a few extra thousand years, but red giants are inevitable and physics is a harsh mistress. His father, however, has an answer: convert humanity to beings of pure energy and let them wander the universe until time itself grinds to a halt. Jaime and billions of others are looking forward to this, but Jaime's father has decided not to go through with the transition. Not because he's afraid of his project's implications, but because he feels the need to stay behind to let those who fear a permanent existence know that death is still possible in that state. Eventually we learn that Jaime's old man has already done this countless times, and has lived through countless versions of the universe. That's where I started freaking out. Of the great stories in this collection, Foy's is the only one that addresses the utter tedium of watching the universe roll out, expand, breed life, destroy life, and collapse, over and over again. Worse, every time the cycle resets, it's the same universe unrolling in the same way, right down to the people who are born (and die), and the order in which they appear and vanish back to the dust whence they came. It's like being trapped in a drive-in movie theater with the same four double-features forever. Sure, it'll take a while to memorize every line of every film, but eventually you're going to want to slit your wrists, except you can't because you're made of pure energy. (It works out in the end, but...Gah!)

  3. 5 out of 5

    sharon mcqueary

    This book was really good. There were so many interesting takes on the theme of immortality, and they all had a different spin on it. Every story kept me immersed to the end, I read it in one day because I couldn't put it down. Once I started a new story it sucked me right in and swept me along. They were all very good, I don't think I could pull a favorite out of the group. I highly recommend it. It will really make you look at living forever in a whole different light. This book was really good. There were so many interesting takes on the theme of immortality, and they all had a different spin on it. Every story kept me immersed to the end, I read it in one day because I couldn't put it down. Once I started a new story it sucked me right in and swept me along. They were all very good, I don't think I could pull a favorite out of the group. I highly recommend it. It will really make you look at living forever in a whole different light.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bill Matthews

    I've just started reading my ARC copy and have just finished the 1st story - WOW. A more detailed review will follow. Let me expand my WOW review of the 1st story - "I wonder where this story is going; I think I know where this is going; I'm pretty sure I know; I's been fun and now I'm positive; WHAT - the author got me and it was a fun journey". so, that is why I simply said WOW. On to story #2 - It brings to my memory a story told by one of my math profs about a history prof who had a student w I've just started reading my ARC copy and have just finished the 1st story - WOW. A more detailed review will follow. Let me expand my WOW review of the 1st story - "I wonder where this story is going; I think I know where this is going; I'm pretty sure I know; I's been fun and now I'm positive; WHAT - the author got me and it was a fun journey". so, that is why I simply said WOW. On to story #2 - It brings to my memory a story told by one of my math profs about a history prof who had a student who would sit with his head on the desk and never appeared to pay attention. The history prof told the math prof that he thought that this kid would come begging wen mid terms were due looking for something to help his grades. As the story was told to me, the young man was the first to turn in his test booklet. The history prof thought "Yes, I was right". Then when he opened the book - for each question was the prof's words from the lecture on that topic written in black and in the margins, written in red, were the jokes that the prof had told during that lecture. Total recall. Would such an individual have problems with too many memories? Then there's the idea of "muscle memory". I was on a tour of a Cooking School in Charleston and the school director showed us a lab where the students learned many different techniques, such as carving meat, by repeating them over and over while watching the teacher on a recording, Muscle memory. We see stories on TV where military vets are having to relearn how to walk because of head injury, again muscle memory. All of this to say, there are some parts of story #2 that are believable because they are based on truth. Also, the story is told in a believable manner with an unexpected twist. Story #3 - This is another top notch story with its share of twists and turns. It gives a new meaning for why Central Park exists. That's not the intention of the story. This one and the next both explore the concept of if we had immortal life, would we really want it? A good job of storytelling. Now, for story #4. This story talks about a moment in time when everything has to come together correctly or the impact is lost. He also used music as part of the illustration. It made me think about a specific musical work that the Texas A&M Singing Cadets performed circa 1962/63. This work was entitled "The Testament of Freedom" and it lasted almost 25 minutes and was the entire 2nd half of our concerts that year. There were few breaks in the singing and we were pretty well exhausted at the end. But! it was worth it. The song is about Freedom and what it meant especially to our Founding Fathers in 1776 and what it can mean to us today. I can still remember the singing and the emotion of that song, based on Thomas Jefferson's writings. I wanted to convey some of those feelings to the author Will Swardstrom so I asked Mr Google and found not only a description on Wikipedia with the words but also some youtube recordings. I found one by the Men's Chorus at Baylor University that I would recommend to anyone reading this review. This is a long recording, some 23 minutes, and it is worth every minute. It today's turmoil in the world as well as in the USA, it behoves us all to take a few minutes and step back and reflect on what those men and women were willing to give in search of freedom back in 1776. It matters not if you had ancestors that were present in the Colonies at that time nor if they were Rebels or Tories. What matters is that those men and women stood for what they believed in, even though it cost many of them all that they had. Even when freedom was won, it took a long time to come up with the Constitution and Bill of Rights. And it even took a second conflict in 1812 before things were finally resolved. On the humorous side, a statue of George Washington was given to England in 1924 and still stands in London but the dirt underneath the statue is from Virginia. I'll leave it you you to find out why. So, take another 24 minutes to refresh your memory of American History and listen to this American Hymn by Baylor Univ Men's Choir Spring Concert April 28, 2014- "The Testament Of Freedom" Randall Thompson. Piano: Michael Womack; Organ: Landry Duvall. In particular note that they had three weeks to prepare and did an excellent job. It can be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zl3Ud... Story # 5 - "The Essence of Jamie's Father" by Gareth Foy. A tale of a form of immortality as well as a story of a relationship between a man and his son. One is more important than the other. You will want to read this and decide for yourself (I've made my decision). Story #6 - "The Backup" by Patricia Gilliam - In the poem “To a Mouse,” by Robert Burns is a famous saying:: “The best laid schemes o' mice an' men / Gang aft a-gley.” - this is an apt description of what transpires in this intriguing tale. Well worth reading. Story #7 - "Legacy" by David Bruns - How far can we go with mechanical replacements? We see almost every day some advancements in prosthetics that have enabled people to once again race with special racing "legs:' Very recently was a picture on social medial of a girl with a functional arm made out of plastic using a 3D printer. Follow along with this story of a man who may have gone just a bit too far and find out how it affected his life. Stories #8 - "A Severance of Souls" by Drew Avera, #9 "Room 42" by D. K. Cassidy and #10 "Eternity Today by Thomas Robins continue with the theme of Immortality and some of the potential undesirable side effects. The last one being a real "twist". Read it to discover what I mean. Story #11 "The House on the Cliff" by E. E. Ciorgi presents a very different view of the subject. A story of winning but yet loosing, a tastefully done love story take will take your heart and give it a tiny twist in the process. Well done. Finally story #12 "A Long Horizon" by Harlow C. Fallon - a story of a girl named Kate who departs her home in search of a better life and ends up on a journey that will take her millions of miles and none hundred years. It's not a pleasant journey. Come and go with the rest of us on that journey. Once again, Samuel Peralta has gather together a group of authors with a set of spell binding stories with many twists and turns as well as unique perspectives to the question of "what would happen if one could live forever?".

  5. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    (Disclaimer: I was given a copy of this book in exchange for beta reading/writing an honest review) I've never dreamed of living forever. I always imagined that living a life on Earth by myself as those I loved passed by me as quickly as a thought to be a lonely and horrible existence. Good thing I have the Immortality Chronicles to imagine what life could be like so I don't have to! They truly captured many possibilities of life with immortality. Most of the stories do have a sad vein to them, b (Disclaimer: I was given a copy of this book in exchange for beta reading/writing an honest review) I've never dreamed of living forever. I always imagined that living a life on Earth by myself as those I loved passed by me as quickly as a thought to be a lonely and horrible existence. Good thing I have the Immortality Chronicles to imagine what life could be like so I don't have to! They truly captured many possibilities of life with immortality. Most of the stories do have a sad vein to them, because as I've said, who really wants to live forever? We choose to try and stay alive as long as we can, trying to make a legacy that others will recognize after we're gone. But we truly don't want to live forever. Samuel Peralta has done it again! He gathered some great authors to teach us why being immortal isn't something to be wished upon anyone. I loved these stories. Each one was more unique then the last! I don't think I could truly choose a favorite, but my top five would have to be: The Antares Cigar Shoppe by John Gregory Hancock: John create a beautiful beginning to the anthology with his story. It makes me wonder who would be there for me if I was able to live forever, even though they couldn't stay with me for all time. Rememorations by Paul B. Kohler: In a few of the stories in this anthology, the issue of not having enough space for all of the memories an immortal person would collect over their many years. I never thought of that before reading this anthology! This story follows a man going in for his check-up because he is forgetting things. Great story! The Control by Will Swardstrom: The Control follows a man in ancient Egypt following a god's whims. Very unique take on the immortal life. Legacy by David Bruns: At what point does a person stop being human? What makes someone human to begin with? Is it human tissue and organs? Is it the soul? If you take away human attributes, is the person still there? Thought provoking and sad in it's own way, Legacy let me wonder about such things. Room 42 by D.K. Cassidy: This one stuck with me. I have kids and could imagine them not ever getting older in body, but becoming wise beyond their appearances as the years flowed by unhindered. It sounds horrifying. Can you imagine not ever becoming an adult? I thought about this one for days after reading it and still think of it when I look at my kids. Even though I am sad that they are growing up SO fast, I am happy too that they can continue to enjoy growing. Eternity Today by Thomas Robins: Thomas tells us a story much like Groundhogs Day, except everyone is affected in the entire world as the day resets day after day for countless days. I love how everyone tried to work together in such a weird and horrifying event such as this. A Long Horizon by Harlow C. Fallon: Harlow finishes up the chronicles with a story about a woman trapped in time. I felt trapped with her and felt her pain and hope for the end of life as if I was in the cell with her. A truly sad and another interesting take on immortality. Oops. That's more then 5. Oh well! You can see that I enjoyed these chronicles. I can't wait to read more of these anthologies put together by Samuel Peralta. I've now read this one and the Z Chronicles, which was also amazing! Snatch it up!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Terry Hill

    The Immortality Chronicles is the latest of the Future Chronicles anthology series initially started by the successful, independent author, Hugh Howey, and later transitioned to author and poet, Samuel Peralta, who has continued to develop the series and producing superb collections of work from both established and new talented authors on the scene. I won't disclose the intent of each story here, since that is part of the self-discovery process each tale elicits from the reader. With each story The Immortality Chronicles is the latest of the Future Chronicles anthology series initially started by the successful, independent author, Hugh Howey, and later transitioned to author and poet, Samuel Peralta, who has continued to develop the series and producing superb collections of work from both established and new talented authors on the scene. I won't disclose the intent of each story here, since that is part of the self-discovery process each tale elicits from the reader. With each story you are placed in the mind and heart of a person of whom time holds no grasp. However, as in the real world, this freedom from time comes not without consequence or a heavy price. These elements of course are what make the situations identifiable and relatable to us all. As we age we all become increasingly aware of how brief our time is here on this infinitesimally small oasis, experiencing this thing called human life. We often fantasize about how wonderful it would be to life forever, or at least for a much longer span than we have been given. The Immortality Chronicles conveys to the reader, as the late Paul Harvey would say, "…the rest of the story". We get a glimpse of what is behind the curtain of immortality, what it really means to live forever, and the burden and heartache that accompanies. It is quite possibly the nature of The Immortality Chronicles that tugs at some of the personal elements, of what it means to be human, by shining a light on that which is not human. And for all of the aspects I have written on, I would say this has been one of the most enjoyable of the Future Chronicles anthologies. Great job to all the talented authors, editor, and orchestrators who were involved!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alexia Purdy

    A stunning anthology I am truly lucky to have gotten to read. I absolutely loved this collection of short stories with the common basis of immortality. Each story was unique and loaded with imagery that drew me in and never let go. It was the perfect read to get away from the humdrum of everyday life. Every morsel was perfectly defined and complete, and I truly enjoyed each take on immortality, life and adventure. My favorite stories from this collection were The Scout, Room 42, Eternity Today, a A stunning anthology I am truly lucky to have gotten to read. I absolutely loved this collection of short stories with the common basis of immortality. Each story was unique and loaded with imagery that drew me in and never let go. It was the perfect read to get away from the humdrum of everyday life. Every morsel was perfectly defined and complete, and I truly enjoyed each take on immortality, life and adventure. My favorite stories from this collection were The Scout, Room 42, Eternity Today, and The Long Horizon, but all of them were excellent. These were so engaging and thought provoking, I was truly submerged in each detail, thought and life of the characters until the end and all of them left me truly breathless. There nothing redundant or even similar in each story, which to my delight, kept me up at all hours reading into the night. Some of these could even be made into novels; the world building was superb and I’d definitely be interested in reading more from all the authors. Immortality can affect individuals in a variety of ways. Some good, some not so much. But each story in this anthology defines the effects it can have on them with an infinite possibility of consequences which never leave anyone unchanged, even when they believe themselves unchanged by time. It’s a truly astonishing collection.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Susan Wisnewski

    I was given an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Immortality Chronicles is a fascinating compilation of short stories by a talented group of authors all offering their original tales on immortality delving into the moral as well as ethical implications of man- made immortality. I especially enjoyed the piece by David Bruns. In Legacy, we meet 199-year-old Edward Stemm, a veteran of the war in Iraq who lost a limb. Frustrated with the poorly crafted artificial limbs of the tim I was given an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Immortality Chronicles is a fascinating compilation of short stories by a talented group of authors all offering their original tales on immortality delving into the moral as well as ethical implications of man- made immortality. I especially enjoyed the piece by David Bruns. In Legacy, we meet 199-year-old Edward Stemm, a veteran of the war in Iraq who lost a limb. Frustrated with the poorly crafted artificial limbs of the time, he creates a company that produced state of the art robotic limbs. His wife dies and he immerses himself in his work. His initial creation leads to innovation after innovation and his company goes on to recreate the entire human body. The story brings us to a courtroom. His estranged great grand daughter, who reminds him of his deceased wife, is attempting to unseat him from his company, as she believes he isn’t working in the best interests of the company. Her argument is that Edward is no longer a man but rather a machine incapable of handling the business. At one point he declares, “I am Stemm Bionics. Every new invention-every single one, mind you-is tested on me first. Me! I am not a brand, I am a man.” Poignant, well crafted and a delight to read don’t miss this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kaleena Rheeya

    I greatly enjoyed reading this anthology. While I have seen movies or read other stories before that involve tropes about immortality, this is the first where I have seen immortality shown along a wide gamut. Each story brought a fresh view on the topic and even though the stories are distinctly separate, the flow of the anthology was superb. I still find myself ruminating over topic as the different scenarios poised by the authors dance in my mind. Whatever your views about immortality are, thi I greatly enjoyed reading this anthology. While I have seen movies or read other stories before that involve tropes about immortality, this is the first where I have seen immortality shown along a wide gamut. Each story brought a fresh view on the topic and even though the stories are distinctly separate, the flow of the anthology was superb. I still find myself ruminating over topic as the different scenarios poised by the authors dance in my mind. Whatever your views about immortality are, this anthology probably has something for you and may even cause you to think deeper about the topic. I highly recommend buying this book. This will be a great addition to any sci-fi lover's collection and is a great entry point for potential new fans for the genre. The added plus is that you'll also be supporting a wonderful cause, First Book, which provides literature for children in need. Share your passion for reading by igniting someone else's today! ***Copy of book was given to me by author John Hancock***

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Dutt

    I've finished this ARC copy a few days ago and WOW....All these authors created a awesome collection of stories of the possibilities of living forever. Some of them were light but some made you really think no way would I want this for myself! All of these authors were amazing! There wasn't any story I didn't love. They were all very different ideas. Honestly a great selection of authors for this book. I seriously would pre-order this before the price goes up. Samuel Peralta did a great selection I've finished this ARC copy a few days ago and WOW....All these authors created a awesome collection of stories of the possibilities of living forever. Some of them were light but some made you really think no way would I want this for myself! All of these authors were amazing! There wasn't any story I didn't love. They were all very different ideas. Honestly a great selection of authors for this book. I seriously would pre-order this before the price goes up. Samuel Peralta did a great selection of authors to be in this. Some of them I have read but some authors were new to me so I need to go look them up now lol. That's how impressed I am with the short stories they did in this set. The cover is brilliant for this book and I have to say again bravo to every author who participated in this! I highly recommend if you love sci-fi what if stories. This one makes you think if you really want to be immortal if you ever had the chance. I can say after reading this no thanks to being immortal.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Fire

    This is a great collection of stories. Multiple authors embarked on this adventure to write short stories to explore what immortality could be like. Each is unique from the other and well thought out. I found this to be an interesting and thought provoking read. Each of the stories captured my attention intrigued me. I wanted each of the stories to keep going, but sadly short stories are just that, short. Everyone of these stories took a different approach to the story and I found myself comparin This is a great collection of stories. Multiple authors embarked on this adventure to write short stories to explore what immortality could be like. Each is unique from the other and well thought out. I found this to be an interesting and thought provoking read. Each of the stories captured my attention intrigued me. I wanted each of the stories to keep going, but sadly short stories are just that, short. Everyone of these stories took a different approach to the story and I found myself comparing the stories and wanting to combine and twist them together into a new story. I don't think I've ever had another book that I read keep me thinking about it as much as this collection has. While I enjoyed all of the stories in this collection I felt that 3 of them stood above the rest. In no particular order they are Legacy by David Bruns, The Scout by D. Robert Pease, and The Control by Will Awards from. I can't recommend this book enough, it awakens your imagination and fuels your curiosity. 5 Stars!

  12. 4 out of 5

    PJ Lea

    Disclaimer: this was an ARC in return for an honest review. A collection of short stories showing different ways that people became immortal. I found this anthology deeply moving, as well as thought provoking, it has made me absolutely certain that I would never want to live forever! From accidents, through deliberate acts, to alien abduction, we are shown the whole gamut of human reactions to the idea of being unable to die. The tales are all well thought out, perfectly executed and with their own Disclaimer: this was an ARC in return for an honest review. A collection of short stories showing different ways that people became immortal. I found this anthology deeply moving, as well as thought provoking, it has made me absolutely certain that I would never want to live forever! From accidents, through deliberate acts, to alien abduction, we are shown the whole gamut of human reactions to the idea of being unable to die. The tales are all well thought out, perfectly executed and with their own separate, often quirky, characters. With science progressing at the speed it is, maybe one of these stories will come true before we know it (but I hope not). I'll definitely be reading more of this genre in the future after reading this.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John Hancock

    I won't rate it because I'm in this one. I loved reading the other authors! every story is a gem. I won't rate it because I'm in this one. I loved reading the other authors! every story is a gem.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    What a great book. I like each author, how they wrote short stories. I won’t spoil it for you. If you enjoy the science fiction anthologies. This book comes highly recommended!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Logan Snyder

    ‘Only Father Time is undefeated.’ So goes the saying in the sports world, a warning that no championship run or title defense lasts forever. So it goes with all things. No matter how hard we fight, entropy catches up to us all eventually, even the greatest of the great. Which naturally begs the question… what if? What if the mortal body could be preserved against its own inevitable breakdown and decay? What if the most brilliant minds could be separated from their mortal shells? How far might we ‘Only Father Time is undefeated.’ So goes the saying in the sports world, a warning that no championship run or title defense lasts forever. So it goes with all things. No matter how hard we fight, entropy catches up to us all eventually, even the greatest of the great. Which naturally begs the question… what if? What if the mortal body could be preserved against its own inevitable breakdown and decay? What if the most brilliant minds could be separated from their mortal shells? How far might we expand our horizons given all the time in the universe? How much might one person or persons affect the world around them given no generational check on their mortality? Would humanity as a whole accept unending life as a gift, or denounce it as a perversion against the natural order? Other reviewers have already done a much better job providing synopses for the stories included within this volume, so I’ll spare you more of the same. All you need to know is that this is a phenomenal volume stacked top to bottom with stories that will surprise and astound you. Immortality can be a tricky subject to tackle. As storytellers, we’re often told to write what we know. But who among us truly knows what it’s like to live forever? Yet, as a subject, it allowed these authors a freedom they embraced and ran with. The result is the most outstanding Chronicles volume to date. (I was provided with an ARC version of this anthology in exchange for an honest review. A positive review was neither encouraged nor implied.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    I read this book a couple of months ago and forgot to post a review. A recent promotion for the book reminded me, and I skimmed through each story again to refresh my memory. I also skimmed through some Amazon reviews, and read one stating that most of the stories are based on cloning, which isn’t real immortality. Concerned for my less-than-young memory, I skimmed the stories again and read each synopsis. Victory is mine on the memory front. Only one story is about cloning. Moving on. Having re I read this book a couple of months ago and forgot to post a review. A recent promotion for the book reminded me, and I skimmed through each story again to refresh my memory. I also skimmed through some Amazon reviews, and read one stating that most of the stories are based on cloning, which isn’t real immortality. Concerned for my less-than-young memory, I skimmed the stories again and read each synopsis. Victory is mine on the memory front. Only one story is about cloning. Moving on. Having refreshed my memory mere hours ago, I can state that this collection contains a good variety of stories. There’s more than one cyborg character, but they’re in very different tales. Something I have no trouble remembering is stories that I find to be unusual. Anything I’ve enjoyed enough to read again sticks in my mind. In this book, my favorites are Eternity Today, Room 42, and A Long Horizon. Honorable mention for The Backup, wherein there is a clone, and Rememorations, wherein the importance of memory is explored. In any anthology, there are always some stories that I don’t love. There were also a couple of those here. Overall, I enjoyed this book and I’m pleased to recommend it. Better late than never, I say. I’d be interested in reading The Memory Chronicles, should anyone decide to write it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gina Smith

    Another great installment in The Future Chronicles. This one focuses on the possibilities of immortality. Each author is allowed to explore this aspect when creating their story so you end up with 12 very different short stories. I especially enjoyed Rememorations which explored what it may be like for the capacity of the brain to reach it's limits. Another favorite of mine The Legacy in which a scientist gradually replaces part of his body with bionics and is now in a conflict with his niece Em Another great installment in The Future Chronicles. This one focuses on the possibilities of immortality. Each author is allowed to explore this aspect when creating their story so you end up with 12 very different short stories. I especially enjoyed Rememorations which explored what it may be like for the capacity of the brain to reach it's limits. Another favorite of mine The Legacy in which a scientist gradually replaces part of his body with bionics and is now in a conflict with his niece Emily. A great collection of entertaining reads. * I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Petersen

    Thought-inducing The first story in this collection is by my friend John Hancock, and it's not the only good one. I find it ironic that religious traditions offer "life everlasting" as the ultimate reward, but stories like these remind us of the downsides. Thought-inducing The first story in this collection is by my friend John Hancock, and it's not the only good one. I find it ironic that religious traditions offer "life everlasting" as the ultimate reward, but stories like these remind us of the downsides.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Seamus

    Excellent collection, continuing the success of the truly ground breaking Future Chronicles! Fun, thoughtful & well worth the read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Arbys Mom

    This is a really good anthology of stories about immortals, or at least those who live much longer than expected. The last story was a bit creepy, but most were excellent.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    The Immorality Chronicles All the Chronicles are really good and this one is no exception. Thanks to all the authors and to Samuel Peralta for another great read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ralyn Longs

    Excellent, almost all of the stories were well worth reading with interesting takes on immortality.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jim Kratzok

    Great collection Like most collections of short stories, some are good, some just mediocre, and occasionally some are spectacular - they make you sit back and think. Or sometimes they make you feel completely astonished because of a twist you didn't see coming. "The Immortality Chronicles" is weighted heavily to the side of great stories without much in the way of mediocre ones. Who knew "Immortality" could be viewed in so many different ways? Great collection Like most collections of short stories, some are good, some just mediocre, and occasionally some are spectacular - they make you sit back and think. Or sometimes they make you feel completely astonished because of a twist you didn't see coming. "The Immortality Chronicles" is weighted heavily to the side of great stories without much in the way of mediocre ones. Who knew "Immortality" could be viewed in so many different ways?

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hrimcealde

    Okay, but not great With the topic of immortality, an author can do quite a lot of interesting things. Unfortunately, a lot of these stories go in the same direction...clones. And most of the clones had the same sorts of problems. I sort of feel that it's not really immortality if it's a clone, you know? There were a few stories though that really were interesting, so it's worth wading your way through. Great for people looking for a short read of speculative fiction, easy to read in small bites. Okay, but not great With the topic of immortality, an author can do quite a lot of interesting things. Unfortunately, a lot of these stories go in the same direction...clones. And most of the clones had the same sorts of problems. I sort of feel that it's not really immortality if it's a clone, you know? There were a few stories though that really were interesting, so it's worth wading your way through. Great for people looking for a short read of speculative fiction, easy to read in small bites. Great for finding new authors. I've already downloaded a book by the last author and I'm looking forward to reading that next.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tom Loock

    I'm quite surprised by the volley of 5 star-reviews. Every anthology is bound to have stories that appeal to an individual, some that do not and some that fall in between, thus covering a spectrum. For me, these 11 stories fall sharply into two categories: three I really liked (those by John Gregory Hancock, David Bruns and Harlow C. Fallon) and two that were okay (Paul B. Kohler and Will Swardstrom), but also six stories (the writers shall remain nameless) I thought were either weak or so disapp I'm quite surprised by the volley of 5 star-reviews. Every anthology is bound to have stories that appeal to an individual, some that do not and some that fall in between, thus covering a spectrum. For me, these 11 stories fall sharply into two categories: three I really liked (those by John Gregory Hancock, David Bruns and Harlow C. Fallon) and two that were okay (Paul B. Kohler and Will Swardstrom), but also six stories (the writers shall remain nameless) I thought were either weak or so disappointing I could not even finish them. Overall 2.4 Stars (just not enough to round it up. Sorry.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Dvorak

    An anthology of twelve short stories, each giving a different perspective on man's quest for immortality and how it would be to achieve it. I particularly liked the first story, The Antares Cigar Shoppe by John Gregory Hancock, but most of the stories were strong and thought-provoking. An anthology of twelve short stories, each giving a different perspective on man's quest for immortality and how it would be to achieve it. I particularly liked the first story, The Antares Cigar Shoppe by John Gregory Hancock, but most of the stories were strong and thought-provoking.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Roffé

    Fantastic I just love the future chronicles and the immortality chronicles is my favorite so far. I have a fear of death and I've always wanted to live forever. This book reminded me of the downsides to that and made me feel better about being mortal. A riveting read! Fantastic I just love the future chronicles and the immortality chronicles is my favorite so far. I have a fear of death and I've always wanted to live forever. This book reminded me of the downsides to that and made me feel better about being mortal. A riveting read!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Pretty good stories that kept me interested. This was a pretty good collection of short stories. They all felt as though they fit together, despite being very different.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Will

    I really enjoyed this collection of short stories. There were some interesting takes on the pitfalls of living forever.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    Most stories in this book is very good.

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