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This one-volume introduction to systematic theology draws deeply on the catholic and Reformed heritage to present the major doctrines of the Christian faith, displaying the power of theological retrieval for the church's renewal. Leading Reformed theologians, such as Kevin Vanhoozer, John Webster, Michael Horton, and Oliver Crisp, offer the "state of the question" on stand This one-volume introduction to systematic theology draws deeply on the catholic and Reformed heritage to present the major doctrines of the Christian faith, displaying the power of theological retrieval for the church's renewal. Leading Reformed theologians, such as Kevin Vanhoozer, John Webster, Michael Horton, and Oliver Crisp, offer the "state of the question" on standard theological topics and engage in both exegetical and historical retrieval for the sake of theological analysis. The book represents the exciting new theological trajectory of Reformed catholicity.


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This one-volume introduction to systematic theology draws deeply on the catholic and Reformed heritage to present the major doctrines of the Christian faith, displaying the power of theological retrieval for the church's renewal. Leading Reformed theologians, such as Kevin Vanhoozer, John Webster, Michael Horton, and Oliver Crisp, offer the "state of the question" on stand This one-volume introduction to systematic theology draws deeply on the catholic and Reformed heritage to present the major doctrines of the Christian faith, displaying the power of theological retrieval for the church's renewal. Leading Reformed theologians, such as Kevin Vanhoozer, John Webster, Michael Horton, and Oliver Crisp, offer the "state of the question" on standard theological topics and engage in both exegetical and historical retrieval for the sake of theological analysis. The book represents the exciting new theological trajectory of Reformed catholicity.

30 review for Christian Dogmatics: Reformed Theology for the Church Catholic

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    A very nice collection of essays on the major loci of theology. Though certain essays are a bit quixotic, each chapter on the whole is an excellent presentation of the doctrine. The strength here lies in that every contributor is conversant with not only the Reformed tradition, but catholic and contemporary theology as well. In my mind, this is what is most helpful about this book: integration of the breadth of the church's tradition, with a distinctively Reformed flavor. It's not often that you A very nice collection of essays on the major loci of theology. Though certain essays are a bit quixotic, each chapter on the whole is an excellent presentation of the doctrine. The strength here lies in that every contributor is conversant with not only the Reformed tradition, but catholic and contemporary theology as well. In my mind, this is what is most helpful about this book: integration of the breadth of the church's tradition, with a distinctively Reformed flavor. It's not often that you can learn about Tertullian, Irenaeus, Bonaventure, Thomas, Luther, Calvin, Maastricht, Ursinus, Turretin, Schleiermacher, Warfield, Hodge, Bavinck, Vos, Barth, Pannenberg, and Moltmann (to name just a small sampling) all in one book! Swain and Allen have given an excellent primer on doing dogmatic theology in both method (Reformed Catholicity) and now in practice (Christian Dogmatics). May the Church continue to be sanctified in her speech and thought through the work of these faithful doctors!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael Cochran

    This is a good systematic theology. Each loci (or topic) is written by someone (presumably) well versed in that field. So instead of a single author you get multiple authors who share the same theological foundation. It's also short (400 pages) so each chapter can only devote about 30 pages to each topic. But it covers nearly the whole theological encyclopedia. All in all it's worth the read. This is a good systematic theology. Each loci (or topic) is written by someone (presumably) well versed in that field. So instead of a single author you get multiple authors who share the same theological foundation. It's also short (400 pages) so each chapter can only devote about 30 pages to each topic. But it covers nearly the whole theological encyclopedia. All in all it's worth the read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kenny Robertson

    Essays vary in quality but worth the price just for John Webster's mind-blowing chapters on Creation and Providence. Still thinking about them months later! Essays vary in quality but worth the price just for John Webster's mind-blowing chapters on Creation and Providence. Still thinking about them months later!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    There are lots of works that contain, compilations of essays, yet most of the time it is a collection of essays in memorandum of a highly praised scholar or exegete. Other works are collections of essays which seek to prove a point, these types of compilation volumes are usually highly scholarly and are not much of use the pastor or Layman. It is a rare feat in which a collection of essays can be aimed at the Scholar, useful to the pastor, and understandable to the Layman. Christian Dogmatics: R There are lots of works that contain, compilations of essays, yet most of the time it is a collection of essays in memorandum of a highly praised scholar or exegete. Other works are collections of essays which seek to prove a point, these types of compilation volumes are usually highly scholarly and are not much of use the pastor or Layman. It is a rare feat in which a collection of essays can be aimed at the Scholar, useful to the pastor, and understandable to the Layman. Christian Dogmatics: Reformed Theology for the Church Catholic is one of those rare fetes. This work, edited by Michael Allen and Scott R. Swain of Reformed Theological Seminary, is a fantastic and worthwhile read. Allen & Swain have brought together some of the greatest living adherence to reformed theology, in an attempt to write about important topics which affect Christendom as a whole. These scholars all wright from a staunchly reformed theological based position, which is guided by their interpretation of Holy Scripture, with a heavy reliance on reformed creeds and confessions as explanations of scripture. These scholars wright on topics such as the knowledge of God, the Holy Trinity, sin, the work of Christ, the Church, and scripture just to name a few. All of these topics are in debate in many Christian circles and a defense of the reformed biblical understanding of these topics was desperately in need. Each of these articles are not only relatively short in length but relatively non verbose, and applicable to the daily Christian life. Another important note is the understanding of the title of this work. Many misunderstand that the word catholic does not mean the Roman Catholic Church, rather the term catholic means universal (notice the little c), meaning the worldwide Church and not a specific group. So when you are reading the title or any part of this book when the term catholic is used in the text please do not misunderstand this term or be put off by it. These authors are trying to show the reformed view of the church bad supplies to all of Christendom, eg. The Church catholic. In the end I highly recommend this compilation work to any and all Christians to understand the Reformed Theological position on important matters pertaining to the Christian faith. No matter who you are scholar, pastor, and Lehman this book Bridges the gap between popular and scholarly level reading and is therefore aimed at everyone, a rare feat indeed. This book was provided to me free of charge from Baker Academic Publishing in exchange for an unbiased, honest review. Christian Dogmatics: Reformed Theology for the Church Catholic © 2016 Edited by Michael Allen and Scott R. Swain Publisher: Baker Academic Page Count: 416 Pages ISBN: 978-0801048944

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This is an okay modern dogmatics. I think there is a place for a more modern dogmatics that is deeply interested in questioning the tradition and how it's done, but this book is both a bit too traditionalist and boring while at the same time including a lot of modern material, some helpful, some intellectual junk food, and some more okay. Webster's essays are the best. He's an actual modern theologian that did real dogmatics and approached some questions between the Reformed and patristics in a b This is an okay modern dogmatics. I think there is a place for a more modern dogmatics that is deeply interested in questioning the tradition and how it's done, but this book is both a bit too traditionalist and boring while at the same time including a lot of modern material, some helpful, some intellectual junk food, and some more okay. Webster's essays are the best. He's an actual modern theologian that did real dogmatics and approached some questions between the Reformed and patristics in a balanced fashion. His two essays are a head and shoulders above the rest and should probably just be scanned and assigned to every Reformed Systematics class on this topic. Crisp on Original Sin was initially invigorating, but quickly became my least favorite: he essentially trades out the older reformed view for one that is equally problematic in all the ways he critiqued it. Gaffin I like a lot too, but for more personal reasons: by pointing me to Rom. 8, he convinced me of the Reformed doctrine of perseverance. Kapic's essay on anthropology seemed a bit weepy and noncommital. I don't remember Treier having anything interesting or memorable (but I think it was good). I also have good vibes from MacLeod giving a good defense of the finality of the atonement. Horton's essays are okay, including some interesting Biblical theology and avoiding some of his usual errors, but not being particularly bold or creative. Billings I really liked too, since he gives a pretty decent defense of paedobaptism and credocommunion, though admitting some of the Reformed were paedocommunion. He gets some stuff amazingly right. Anyway, there's more essays but I probably won't read them. Life is short, and I think older theology and modern scholarship are better reading for these questions.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Brown

    This was a dense but good systematic theology text book. In just under 400 pages, the authors address the common headings of systematic theology. However, it doesn't read like a classic ST but more a compilation of essays on each topic. It was a bit confusing the overarching goal of the book since each author seemed to take a different approach. Some authors succulently offered a summary and defense of the teaching of the Reformed Confessions (Swain on the Trinity, Gaffin on the work of Christ, This was a dense but good systematic theology text book. In just under 400 pages, the authors address the common headings of systematic theology. However, it doesn't read like a classic ST but more a compilation of essays on each topic. It was a bit confusing the overarching goal of the book since each author seemed to take a different approach. Some authors succulently offered a summary and defense of the teaching of the Reformed Confessions (Swain on the Trinity, Gaffin on the work of Christ, Horton on the church, Billings on the sacraments). Others seemed to offer a minority voice (Treier on the Incarnation, Horton on the Kingdom of God) and others a correction to the confessional consensus (Crisp on sin). Billings' chapter on the sacraments was some of the most beautiful work I've read on the topic. Will be returning to it regularly.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David Goetz

    I've only read about half of the essays, but each one has been solid and several have been outstanding (unsurprisingly, Webster's essays stood above the rest, especially the essay on providence). This volume would make a nice entry-point to the deep end of Reformed dogmatics. Though the descriptions and definitions and arguments are pretty rigorous, the focus of each chapter on a particular doctrinal locus and the necessary constraints on length in a volume like this one make the content of any I've only read about half of the essays, but each one has been solid and several have been outstanding (unsurprisingly, Webster's essays stood above the rest, especially the essay on providence). This volume would make a nice entry-point to the deep end of Reformed dogmatics. Though the descriptions and definitions and arguments are pretty rigorous, the focus of each chapter on a particular doctrinal locus and the necessary constraints on length in a volume like this one make the content of any given chapter accessible. You also get a good introduction to theology's technical vocabulary (much of it in Latin). This would be a great volume for pastors and also for seminary students in the Reformed tradition.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Parkison

    What a rich volume! Apart from the obvious quibbles a baptist is bound to have with some of the content (like some parts of Horton's chapter on *The Church* or Billings' chapter on *Sacraments*), every chapter was outstanding. The one exception to this was Oliver Crisp's chapter on *Sin.* I really don't know what it was doing in this volume... Particularly noteworthy chapters were Michael Allen's on *Knowledge of God,* Kevin Vanhoozer's on *Holy Sripture,* Scott Swain's on *Covenant of Redemptio What a rich volume! Apart from the obvious quibbles a baptist is bound to have with some of the content (like some parts of Horton's chapter on *The Church* or Billings' chapter on *Sacraments*), every chapter was outstanding. The one exception to this was Oliver Crisp's chapter on *Sin.* I really don't know what it was doing in this volume... Particularly noteworthy chapters were Michael Allen's on *Knowledge of God,* Kevin Vanhoozer's on *Holy Sripture,* Scott Swain's on *Covenant of Redemption,* and Richard Gaffin's *The Work of Christ Accomplished* (whose very brief section therein on sin all but makes up for Crisp!).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Peter Stonecipher

    Wonderful book with contributions from Reformed theologians of a variety of stripes. These chapters are on traditional loci of systematics, but are approached from fresh perspectives. Well worth picking up.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jae H Kim

    A marvellous feast in Reformed theology. Swain and Webster's chapters were outstanding A marvellous feast in Reformed theology. Swain and Webster's chapters were outstanding

  11. 5 out of 5

    george kantartzis

    Pages 311-338 Chapter 14 - "The Church" - By Michael Horton Pages 311-338 Chapter 14 - "The Church" - By Michael Horton

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Stanley

    Allen and Swain have assembled an all-star cast here in this book. In this text some of the best Reformed thinkers alive produce succinct, relevant, and interesting summaries of various dogmatic loci. This book includes such thinkers as Kevin Vanhoozer on Scripture, John Webster on Creation Out of Nothing, Richard Gaffin on Redemption Applied, Paul Nimmo on Ethics, and the ever entertaining Oliver Crisp on Sin. While every essay is strong and worth reading, some stand outs are Allen's chapter on Allen and Swain have assembled an all-star cast here in this book. In this text some of the best Reformed thinkers alive produce succinct, relevant, and interesting summaries of various dogmatic loci. This book includes such thinkers as Kevin Vanhoozer on Scripture, John Webster on Creation Out of Nothing, Richard Gaffin on Redemption Applied, Paul Nimmo on Ethics, and the ever entertaining Oliver Crisp on Sin. While every essay is strong and worth reading, some stand outs are Allen's chapter on the Knowledge of God, Vanhoozer on Scripture, Todd Billings on the Sacraments, Gaffin on Redemption Applied, and MacLeod on Redemption Accomplished. And of course, the essays from John Webster are a treat. I'd highly recommend this work for its engagement with a variety of thinkers, as well as its effort to engage contemporary questions and challenges.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Only read the following: "Knowledge of God" by Michael Allen (ch. 1) "Holy Scripture" by Kevin J. Vanhoozer (ch. 2) "Divine Attributes" by Michael Allen (ch. 3) "Divine Trinity" by Scott Swain (ch. 4) Swain on Covenant of Redemption Webster on Creation & Providence "The Church" by Michael Horton (ch. 14) "Sacraments" by Todd Billings (ch. 15) Only read the following: "Knowledge of God" by Michael Allen (ch. 1) "Holy Scripture" by Kevin J. Vanhoozer (ch. 2) "Divine Attributes" by Michael Allen (ch. 3) "Divine Trinity" by Scott Swain (ch. 4) Swain on Covenant of Redemption Webster on Creation & Providence "The Church" by Michael Horton (ch. 14) "Sacraments" by Todd Billings (ch. 15)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Austin Gannett

    This really is a fantastic volume and follow-up to "Reformed Catholicity". I thought every essay was solid with some definite standouts. Both of Webster's essays, in particular, are gems and worth the price of the book in my opinion. Will be revisiting these essays again to be sure. This really is a fantastic volume and follow-up to "Reformed Catholicity". I thought every essay was solid with some definite standouts. Both of Webster's essays, in particular, are gems and worth the price of the book in my opinion. Will be revisiting these essays again to be sure.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell Norris

  16. 5 out of 5

    Corey

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shane Becker

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Katthagen

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Hanby

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alasdair Peterson

  22. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zachary Wilke

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  25. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Cordeiro

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sam Bostock

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cory Brock

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nate Claiborne

  29. 4 out of 5

    J. Brandon

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joel Sim

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