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What American Editors Said about the Ten Million Dollar Libel Suit: Editorial Comment in American Press on the Lawsuit Brought in the Name of the City of Chicago Against the Chicago Tribune (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from What American Editors Said About the Ten Million Dollar Libel Suit: Editorial Comment in American Press on the Lawsuit Brought in the Name of the City of Chicago Against the Chicago Tribune This suit was a novelty in American law, being founded on the theory that because a municipal corporation holds property, makes contracts, employs credit and carries on busi Excerpt from What American Editors Said About the Ten Million Dollar Libel Suit: Editorial Comment in American Press on the Lawsuit Brought in the Name of the City of Chicago Against the Chicago Tribune This suit was a novelty in American law, being founded on the theory that because a municipal corporation holds property, makes contracts, employs credit and carries on business, it is entitled to bring action like a private corporation, for libelous publication. To this suit the Tribune filed demurrer chiefly on the ground that a municipality is a political agency, an agency of government, and that to permit a suit for civil damages for libel would be infringement upon the right of free speech and free press. On this ground Judge Harry 1\i. Fisher, of the Circuit Court of Cook County, sustained the demurrer in a notable Opinion, widely quoted, as will appear in the following editorial discussion of the case. From this discussion it will be observed that Virtually the entire press of the United States, to say nothing of several of the leading newspapers of Great Britain, recognized the importance of the suit as a recrudescence of the long continued effort of governmental authority to paralyze criticism, an effort beginning with the Star Chamber and ending with the thorough establishment of political freedom in the American republic. The suit is an anomaly, without precedent in American law, and as Judge Fisher remarked, is not in harmony with the genius, spirit and objects of our institutions. It does not belong in our day. It fits in rather with the genius of the rulers who conceived of law not in the purity of love for justice, but in the lustful passion for undisturbed power. The comment of the American press on this case and Judge Fisher's decision, the Tribune believes, is of historical interest and therefore offers it to the newspaper fraternity and to the public as a noteworthy expression of American thought and principle. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


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Excerpt from What American Editors Said About the Ten Million Dollar Libel Suit: Editorial Comment in American Press on the Lawsuit Brought in the Name of the City of Chicago Against the Chicago Tribune This suit was a novelty in American law, being founded on the theory that because a municipal corporation holds property, makes contracts, employs credit and carries on busi Excerpt from What American Editors Said About the Ten Million Dollar Libel Suit: Editorial Comment in American Press on the Lawsuit Brought in the Name of the City of Chicago Against the Chicago Tribune This suit was a novelty in American law, being founded on the theory that because a municipal corporation holds property, makes contracts, employs credit and carries on business, it is entitled to bring action like a private corporation, for libelous publication. To this suit the Tribune filed demurrer chiefly on the ground that a municipality is a political agency, an agency of government, and that to permit a suit for civil damages for libel would be infringement upon the right of free speech and free press. On this ground Judge Harry 1\i. Fisher, of the Circuit Court of Cook County, sustained the demurrer in a notable Opinion, widely quoted, as will appear in the following editorial discussion of the case. From this discussion it will be observed that Virtually the entire press of the United States, to say nothing of several of the leading newspapers of Great Britain, recognized the importance of the suit as a recrudescence of the long continued effort of governmental authority to paralyze criticism, an effort beginning with the Star Chamber and ending with the thorough establishment of political freedom in the American republic. The suit is an anomaly, without precedent in American law, and as Judge Fisher remarked, is not in harmony with the genius, spirit and objects of our institutions. It does not belong in our day. It fits in rather with the genius of the rulers who conceived of law not in the purity of love for justice, but in the lustful passion for undisturbed power. The comment of the American press on this case and Judge Fisher's decision, the Tribune believes, is of historical interest and therefore offers it to the newspaper fraternity and to the public as a noteworthy expression of American thought and principle. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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