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Righting Canada's Wrongs: Residential Schools: The Devastating Impact on Canada's Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Findings and Calls for Action

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Canada's residential school system for aboriginal young people is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. This book documents this subject in a format that will give all young people access to this painful part of Canadian history. In 1857, the Gradual Civilization Act was passed by the Legislature of the Provin Canada's residential school system for aboriginal young people is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. This book documents this subject in a format that will give all young people access to this painful part of Canadian history. In 1857, the Gradual Civilization Act was passed by the Legislature of the Province of Canada with the aim of assimilating First Nations people. In 1879, Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald commissioned the "Report on Industrial Schools for Indians and Half-Breeds." This report led to native residential schools across Canada. First Nations and Inuit children aged seven to fifteen years old were taken from their families, sometimes by force, and sent to residential schools where they were made to abandon their culture. They were dressed in uniforms, their hair was cut, they were forbidden to speak their native language, and they were often subjected to physical and psychological abuse. The schools were run by the churches and funded by the federal government. About 150,000 aboriginal children went to 130 residential schools across Canada. The last federally funded residential school closed in 1996 in Saskatchewan. The horrors that many children endured at residential schools did not go away. It took decades for people to speak out, but with the support of the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations, former residential school students took the federal government and the churches to court. Their cases led to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history. In 2008, Prime Minister Harper formally apologized to former native residential school students for the atrocities they suffered and the role the government played in setting up the school system. The agreement included the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which has since worked to document this experience and toward reconciliation. Through historical photographs, documents, and first-person narratives from First Nations, Inuit, and Metis people who survived residential schools, this book offers an account of the injustice of this period in Canadian history. It documents how this official racism was confronted and finally acknowledged.


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Canada's residential school system for aboriginal young people is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. This book documents this subject in a format that will give all young people access to this painful part of Canadian history. In 1857, the Gradual Civilization Act was passed by the Legislature of the Provin Canada's residential school system for aboriginal young people is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. This book documents this subject in a format that will give all young people access to this painful part of Canadian history. In 1857, the Gradual Civilization Act was passed by the Legislature of the Province of Canada with the aim of assimilating First Nations people. In 1879, Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald commissioned the "Report on Industrial Schools for Indians and Half-Breeds." This report led to native residential schools across Canada. First Nations and Inuit children aged seven to fifteen years old were taken from their families, sometimes by force, and sent to residential schools where they were made to abandon their culture. They were dressed in uniforms, their hair was cut, they were forbidden to speak their native language, and they were often subjected to physical and psychological abuse. The schools were run by the churches and funded by the federal government. About 150,000 aboriginal children went to 130 residential schools across Canada. The last federally funded residential school closed in 1996 in Saskatchewan. The horrors that many children endured at residential schools did not go away. It took decades for people to speak out, but with the support of the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations, former residential school students took the federal government and the churches to court. Their cases led to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history. In 2008, Prime Minister Harper formally apologized to former native residential school students for the atrocities they suffered and the role the government played in setting up the school system. The agreement included the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which has since worked to document this experience and toward reconciliation. Through historical photographs, documents, and first-person narratives from First Nations, Inuit, and Metis people who survived residential schools, this book offers an account of the injustice of this period in Canadian history. It documents how this official racism was confronted and finally acknowledged.

45 review for Righting Canada's Wrongs: Residential Schools: The Devastating Impact on Canada's Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Findings and Calls for Action

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is the first book I have read from the "Righting Canada's Wrongs" series, but this one definitely has me hoping the others are just as enlightening. The Indian Residential School system is an absolute stain on Canada's history, and this book is a fantastic starting point. Using a simplistic style, and complemented with many pieces of art and photography, Florence puts the information forth in the easiest to understand way possible. The information is the kind that is not easy to digest, and This is the first book I have read from the "Righting Canada's Wrongs" series, but this one definitely has me hoping the others are just as enlightening. The Indian Residential School system is an absolute stain on Canada's history, and this book is a fantastic starting point. Using a simplistic style, and complemented with many pieces of art and photography, Florence puts the information forth in the easiest to understand way possible. The information is the kind that is not easy to digest, and there is no way it could have been written to make it so. Constructing a complete narrative, Florence starts prior to contact, gives background on Canada's indigenous peoples, and then works her way forward. The narrative leads up to present day, including the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's full report and recommendations (and includes many excerpts of the report for anyone who might not be inclined to read the report in its entirety). This makes for an excellent place to start for anyone looking to understand the IRS system and the impact is had on Canada's indigenous peoples. Whether you know nothing bout it at all, or are starting with a basic understanding from the news or other book sources, you will definitely have something to learn here. Basically anyone who hasn't rad the full TRC report should have something to learn here. I would also recommend this book for any younger readers (middle school) interested in the darker side of Canadian history.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Dionisio

    Didn't realize this was written as a textbook and not a novel when I put it on hold at the library; totally my mistake but I was just excited to read the series after seeing it circulating on social media. This is the first of the series I've read, and it reads like a lower grade school textbook. Lots of quotes and pictures, and very age appropriate for youth in elementary school. It makes it very digestible for anyone who is just beginning to learn about indigenous history in Canada. Didn't realize this was written as a textbook and not a novel when I put it on hold at the library; totally my mistake but I was just excited to read the series after seeing it circulating on social media. This is the first of the series I've read, and it reads like a lower grade school textbook. Lots of quotes and pictures, and very age appropriate for youth in elementary school. It makes it very digestible for anyone who is just beginning to learn about indigenous history in Canada.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Damaris Bredin

    This was a fabulous read on Canadian residential schools. This is perfect for all ages, since there are pictures to engage young readers, but compelling information, quotes and eyewitness accounts to satisfy older ones. This book takes a very objective stance on residential schools, comparative to other books perhaps written by survivors themselves. I really enjoyed this read, and I think the rest of the series would be awesome as well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Luciana

    This was a very informative and well laid out book that explained the impact of colonialism, the beginning & ending of residential schools, their affects on survivors & family & where we, as a nation, are heading now. I chose this out of the children's nonfiction section of our library & found it was easy to understand & a very powerful read! A great book for all ages! This was a very informative and well laid out book that explained the impact of colonialism, the beginning & ending of residential schools, their affects on survivors & family & where we, as a nation, are heading now. I chose this out of the children's nonfiction section of our library & found it was easy to understand & a very powerful read! A great book for all ages!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura Wiebe

    Non-fiction. Junior High level. But still easy to read. Talks about the apology Canadian gov't gave, and about the Truth and Reconciliation process. A very good (but not in-depth) summary of historical events. Non-fiction. Junior High level. But still easy to read. Talks about the apology Canadian gov't gave, and about the Truth and Reconciliation process. A very good (but not in-depth) summary of historical events.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Maureen Ulrich

    This book is a comprehensive history of colonialism, leading up to the creation of residental schools.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Keith

    A book every Canadian should read Disturbing photos and facts from a painful time in Canada's history. A book every Canadian should read Disturbing photos and facts from a painful time in Canada's history.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Coatesj

    The pictures and direct quotes from survivalist is so impactful. Very informative and real. Tells the complete story, including what should guide future action and healing. Gives me hope.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rhoda Perron

    A hard cover glossy photo book of the history of residential schools. Also includes indigenous history of culture and traditions. I appreciated reading the apologies by PM Harper, Pm Trudeau, and the churches involved. A good overall explanation of what the Reconciliation movement is about.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jaime Morse

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katie Tozer

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karene

  17. 5 out of 5

    Library Cool

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marys Niesink

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  21. 4 out of 5

    Darlene

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  24. 4 out of 5

    Karrine Elizabeth

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy Korver

  26. 5 out of 5

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  27. 5 out of 5

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  28. 5 out of 5

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  29. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erin Walker

  31. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Dearborn

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sylvan Library

  33. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Mcsherry

  34. 4 out of 5

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  35. 4 out of 5

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  36. 4 out of 5

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  37. 5 out of 5

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  38. 5 out of 5

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  39. 4 out of 5

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  40. 5 out of 5

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  41. 5 out of 5

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  42. 4 out of 5

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  43. 5 out of 5

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  44. 5 out of 5

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  45. 5 out of 5

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