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*Includes pictures *Includes primary accounts of the attack *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “Think about the people as if they were storm troopers in Star Wars. They may be individually innocent, but they are guilty because they work for the Evil Empire." – Timothy McVeigh Two days after Ramzi Yousef’s attac *Includes pictures *Includes primary accounts of the attack *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “Think about the people as if they were storm troopers in Star Wars. They may be individually innocent, but they are guilty because they work for the Evil Empire." – Timothy McVeigh Two days after Ramzi Yousef’s attack on the World Trade Center in 1993, federal agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), the FBI and the Texas National Guard surrounded the Mount Carmel Center compound outside of Waco, Texas. They were there to search the property of the Branch Davidians, a religious cult, due to allegations that cult members were sexually abusing children and had assault weapons. When they began searching, the Branch Davidians, led by David Koresh, fired on them, starting a firefight and a nearly two month long siege of the compound. The siege of the compound ended on April 19, 1993 with the deaths of over 75 cult members, including children, and in the wake of the event there was a lot of soul searching, but in addition to influencing how the government approached potential future conflicts with other groups, Waco’s most important legacy was that it enraged people who already had an anti-government bent. As it turned out, the most notable was a young Gulf War veteran named Timothy McVeigh, who came to Waco during the siege and shouted his support for gun rights. After the siege ended, McVeigh was determined to strike back at the federal government. In 1994, McVeigh and an old Army buddy, Michael Fortier, decided they would bomb the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City because several federal agencies had offices inside, including the ATF. With the help of Terry Nichols, McVeigh constructed a bomb out of fertilizer that weighed over two tons and placed it in a rented Ryder truck, the same company Ramzi Yousef had rented a van from. At about 9:00 a.m. on April 19, 1995, the second anniversary of the end of the siege in Waco, McVeigh’s bomb exploded with a force so powerful that it registered seismic readings across much of Oklahoma and could be heard 50 miles away. The explosion killed 168 people, including young children in the building’s day-care center. McVeigh was captured shortly after the explosion, and he never displayed remorse for his actions. When he later learned about the day-care center, McVeigh called the children “collateral damage.” At the time, the bombing was the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil in history, and McVeigh was executed on June 11, 2001, three months before the bombing became the second deadliest terrorist attack on American soil in history. The Oklahoma City Bombing: The History of the Deadliest Domestic Terrorist Attack in American History chronicles the notorious terrorist attack. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Oklahoma City bombing like never before.


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*Includes pictures *Includes primary accounts of the attack *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “Think about the people as if they were storm troopers in Star Wars. They may be individually innocent, but they are guilty because they work for the Evil Empire." – Timothy McVeigh Two days after Ramzi Yousef’s attac *Includes pictures *Includes primary accounts of the attack *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “Think about the people as if they were storm troopers in Star Wars. They may be individually innocent, but they are guilty because they work for the Evil Empire." – Timothy McVeigh Two days after Ramzi Yousef’s attack on the World Trade Center in 1993, federal agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), the FBI and the Texas National Guard surrounded the Mount Carmel Center compound outside of Waco, Texas. They were there to search the property of the Branch Davidians, a religious cult, due to allegations that cult members were sexually abusing children and had assault weapons. When they began searching, the Branch Davidians, led by David Koresh, fired on them, starting a firefight and a nearly two month long siege of the compound. The siege of the compound ended on April 19, 1993 with the deaths of over 75 cult members, including children, and in the wake of the event there was a lot of soul searching, but in addition to influencing how the government approached potential future conflicts with other groups, Waco’s most important legacy was that it enraged people who already had an anti-government bent. As it turned out, the most notable was a young Gulf War veteran named Timothy McVeigh, who came to Waco during the siege and shouted his support for gun rights. After the siege ended, McVeigh was determined to strike back at the federal government. In 1994, McVeigh and an old Army buddy, Michael Fortier, decided they would bomb the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City because several federal agencies had offices inside, including the ATF. With the help of Terry Nichols, McVeigh constructed a bomb out of fertilizer that weighed over two tons and placed it in a rented Ryder truck, the same company Ramzi Yousef had rented a van from. At about 9:00 a.m. on April 19, 1995, the second anniversary of the end of the siege in Waco, McVeigh’s bomb exploded with a force so powerful that it registered seismic readings across much of Oklahoma and could be heard 50 miles away. The explosion killed 168 people, including young children in the building’s day-care center. McVeigh was captured shortly after the explosion, and he never displayed remorse for his actions. When he later learned about the day-care center, McVeigh called the children “collateral damage.” At the time, the bombing was the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil in history, and McVeigh was executed on June 11, 2001, three months before the bombing became the second deadliest terrorist attack on American soil in history. The Oklahoma City Bombing: The History of the Deadliest Domestic Terrorist Attack in American History chronicles the notorious terrorist attack. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Oklahoma City bombing like never before.

37 review for The Oklahoma City Bombing: The History of the Deadliest Domestic Terrorist Attack in American History

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    The Oklahoma City Bombing: The History of the Deadliest Domestic Terrorist Attack in American History is by Charles River Editors. This is a horrific book because it brings back such memories of that fateful day and the days afterwards. The book is written in the words of people involved with the arrack or with the government. The book covers from the time McVeigh started talking about bombing the Federal building until the trial of Nichols. McVeigh finally got the death penalty for his actions. The Oklahoma City Bombing: The History of the Deadliest Domestic Terrorist Attack in American History is by Charles River Editors. This is a horrific book because it brings back such memories of that fateful day and the days afterwards. The book is written in the words of people involved with the arrack or with the government. The book covers from the time McVeigh started talking about bombing the Federal building until the trial of Nichols. McVeigh finally got the death penalty for his actions. Terry Nichols got life imprisonment and Fortnier received 12 years in prison. Even though much time has passed, this book brought all those terrible memories back along with the good ones about how Oklahomans all worked together to help the families. The Oklahoma Standard was born that day.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Debra Nagel

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chalmation

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    Jeremy Aker

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    Michelle

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    Jason McMillan

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    LAUREN S. MCLEAN

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    Hilda M. Grose

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    Kendra Clay

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    Nicole

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    Kevin

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    Barbara Gillard

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    Aubrey James Jr

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    Kevin Allies

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    tm

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    Lisa

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    John Pointon

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    Joanna

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    Rebecca

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    Heather Schulze

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    Lauren Fryman

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    Jen

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    Ray Horvath

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    melissapressler

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    Tina Taylor lintz

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    Maria J. Macaluso

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    Mary

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    Lynda Heelan perry

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    Shelley

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    Genereams

  36. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Haney

  37. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Perkins

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