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The Constitution of the United States with Index and The Declaration of Independence

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The Constitution of the United States, with Index, and The Declaration of Independence: Pocket Edition This Constitution was proofed word for word against the original Constitution housed in the Archives in Washington, D.C. It is identical in spelling, capitalization and punctuation. It is sized in accordance with one produced by President Thomas Jefferson and includes the The Constitution of the United States, with Index, and The Declaration of Independence: Pocket Edition This Constitution was proofed word for word against the original Constitution housed in the Archives in Washington, D.C. It is identical in spelling, capitalization and punctuation. It is sized in accordance with one produced by President Thomas Jefferson and includes the Bill of Rights, Amendments 11 through 27, The Declaration of Independence and a complete index of the Constitution. 52 pages. 3-1/4 x 6-1/2 inches. Published by the National Center for Constitutional Studies, a nonprofit educational foundation dedicated to restoring Constitutional principles in the tradition of America's Founding Fathers.


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The Constitution of the United States, with Index, and The Declaration of Independence: Pocket Edition This Constitution was proofed word for word against the original Constitution housed in the Archives in Washington, D.C. It is identical in spelling, capitalization and punctuation. It is sized in accordance with one produced by President Thomas Jefferson and includes the The Constitution of the United States, with Index, and The Declaration of Independence: Pocket Edition This Constitution was proofed word for word against the original Constitution housed in the Archives in Washington, D.C. It is identical in spelling, capitalization and punctuation. It is sized in accordance with one produced by President Thomas Jefferson and includes the Bill of Rights, Amendments 11 through 27, The Declaration of Independence and a complete index of the Constitution. 52 pages. 3-1/4 x 6-1/2 inches. Published by the National Center for Constitutional Studies, a nonprofit educational foundation dedicated to restoring Constitutional principles in the tradition of America's Founding Fathers.

30 review for The Constitution of the United States with Index and The Declaration of Independence

  1. 5 out of 5

    Books Ring Mah Bell

    It's a goddamn shame when our "leader" refers to this as "a goddamn piece of paper". I handed out pocket sized Constitutions on Constitution Day last year. I am a nerd.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Enrique Valdivia

    The original pretty much sucks. Slavery, women and renters can't vote etc. Electoral college = WTF? The amendments rock though. Wonder if there will be any decent sequels.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kells Next Read

    "A Must Read" and Re-Read Yearly.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. In regards to the Constitution alone, here's a few articles and amendments I feel are interesting or relevant to our times: Article. I. Section. 8. The Congress shall have the We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. In regards to the Constitution alone, here's a few articles and amendments I feel are interesting or relevant to our times: Article. I. Section. 8. The Congress shall have the Power to lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States... ...To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries... ...To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years... Section. 9. The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it. Article. II. Section. 4. The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors. Article. IV. Section. 2. The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several States. Section. 4. The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and on Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened) against domestic Violence. Article. VI. The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States. Amendment I. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Amendment II. A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. Amendment IV. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. Amendment V. No person shall be held to answer for capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger... ...nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation. Amendment VIII Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. Amendment IX. The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. Amendment X. The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. Amendment XVI. The Congress shall have the power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    It's really interesting to go through the Constitution and see what it actually says. For example, the issue of separation between church and state really isn't quite how it's often portrayed. The Constitution provides for the non-intervention of the government in religion, and says practically nothing about the non-intervention of religion in government -- at least, I couldn't find anything. One thing that I really like about this edition is that it marks the sections of the Constitution and ame It's really interesting to go through the Constitution and see what it actually says. For example, the issue of separation between church and state really isn't quite how it's often portrayed. The Constitution provides for the non-intervention of the government in religion, and says practically nothing about the non-intervention of religion in government -- at least, I couldn't find anything. One thing that I really like about this edition is that it marks the sections of the Constitution and amendments that were amended by later amendments and notes which amendments updated the text. It's really embarrassing to me that I had never read the Constitution before, even though I took oath to uphold it in a previous job. It's quite short, so it's not like it takes that long. Of course, there's a fair bit of legal language in there, too, which makes for slow reading.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Went back and read the Constitution. (Read it a lifetime ago, in high school). Started out taking notes as I went, but that got burdensome, so I just read through it. So much information - felt like I was in history class again. It is a lot to remember and keep straight. Maybe if I read it several times a year it will stick better. Made me wonder if our senators and representatives (and president) have the knowledge committed to their memories. Such a well organized, and beautifully written docu Went back and read the Constitution. (Read it a lifetime ago, in high school). Started out taking notes as I went, but that got burdensome, so I just read through it. So much information - felt like I was in history class again. It is a lot to remember and keep straight. Maybe if I read it several times a year it will stick better. Made me wonder if our senators and representatives (and president) have the knowledge committed to their memories. Such a well organized, and beautifully written document!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    It is a great set of principles for forming a country. They did some good things. But, they did leave out some crucial points in the beginning - namely excluding women and counting the Indians as half-people and, of course, the problem of slavery. If Thomas Jefferson's quote is to be considered below, then it's safe to say that the 2nd Amendment didn't mean a free-for-all, shoot-em-up bloodfest with any gun you can get your hands on. One should consider why guns were needed at the period of time It is a great set of principles for forming a country. They did some good things. But, they did leave out some crucial points in the beginning - namely excluding women and counting the Indians as half-people and, of course, the problem of slavery. If Thomas Jefferson's quote is to be considered below, then it's safe to say that the 2nd Amendment didn't mean a free-for-all, shoot-em-up bloodfest with any gun you can get your hands on. One should consider why guns were needed at the period of time in the nation's history and how those reasons changed and are not exactly relevant today. Not that I, in any way, suggest repealing the 2nd Amendment. I believe that the Constitution is a living document that needs to change with time. Obviously, it has been changed (slowly) through the years by the addition of certain amendments. I read that there have been more than 1,000 additional amendments proposed and that there are still 6 outstanding amendments. Why we don't have an Equal Rights Amendment is ??? I would have written it differently (but, I suppose it needs to read in the context of its time) and I'd make some changes. I'm curious to look at other constitutions and see what principles other countries considered in terms of laws and basic human rights. "...instead of trying what meaning may be squeezed out of the text or invented against it, conform to the probable one in which it was passed" Thomas Jefferson "Only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters." Benjamin Franklin

  8. 5 out of 5

    Josh Kanownik

    Docked a point for including overtly religious quotes in he beginning without noting the religious affiliation of the publisher. I actually don't mind the quotes themselves as they provide decent context for the times and are buffered by Article VI and the First Amendment. Just wish they had been more forthcoming about it. There are other options available that I would choose over this version in hindsight. This version is perfectly fine otherwise and have no qualms with sharing it with the addi Docked a point for including overtly religious quotes in he beginning without noting the religious affiliation of the publisher. I actually don't mind the quotes themselves as they provide decent context for the times and are buffered by Article VI and the First Amendment. Just wish they had been more forthcoming about it. There are other options available that I would choose over this version in hindsight. This version is perfectly fine otherwise and have no qualms with sharing it with the additional context. The most striking thing about re-reading the Constitution today is the limit of one representative per thirty-thousand people. We're up to 700,000+. Not sure why that hasn't been receiving a larger focus in the current political discussion. Also striking to be reminded that there is no mention of education in the Constitution at all. Despite numerous quotes from Madison, Jefferson and Washington on the importance of it. It is a great reminder that the Constitution is not perfect or comprehensive and is dependent on us to uphold the ideals of the preamble.

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Hands down, this is one of the most amazing documents ever written as it sets forth a government that both curtails man's eternal quest for power while giving future generations the flexibility they need to alter it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Marlene

    Perfect clarity!

  11. 4 out of 5

    J.T. Hume

    These terms of service should be required reading for every American.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Obi-Wan Kenobi

    It confused me with the nonstop correct words. What if someone made a book where it’s a dumbed down version that people like me can get in our heads, like if you agree.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jm Cool

    testing adding additional editions

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris Halverson

    What can one say about the Constitution? One thing real quick, this particular edition begins with quotes to ensure we know that the Hand of Providence (aka God), Principles, Virtue and Freedom, and Education are all implicitly enshrined in the Constitution. This pamphlet also contains the Declaration of Independence. As for the Constitution itself, I’m struck again by how non-partisan it appears (I know, the wide variety of wrangling that went into creating the document bears this impression to b What can one say about the Constitution? One thing real quick, this particular edition begins with quotes to ensure we know that the Hand of Providence (aka God), Principles, Virtue and Freedom, and Education are all implicitly enshrined in the Constitution. This pamphlet also contains the Declaration of Independence. As for the Constitution itself, I’m struck again by how non-partisan it appears (I know, the wide variety of wrangling that went into creating the document bears this impression to be false). It is the rules of the game, not the game itself. There is also a sense of goodwill and trust implied. It’s like the authors assume that there will be a group of reasonable people gathered together to do the people’s business. For example, veto power sounds like it is a conversation between the legislative branch and executive, not a battle. State regulation of imports and exports sounds like someone shrugged and said, “Well, the federal government controls that, other than when it is reasonable for the states to do that,” like there is a consensus on what is reasonable. … huh, it almost seems like I’m writing more about our own time than the actually document… At any rate everyone should own a copy of this, it is the rules of the road, let’s not crash.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    How can we ever read this book too often? It makes me marvel that these great men, our Founding Fathers, were lead by our Heavenly Father. He wrote these laws through them, which is why we should be very careful in changing any of them. We have gone too far on so many levels. Reading this again this week has made me feel there is no earthly way to get back to where we once declared our freedom, and lived accordingly.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Karen P

    Praise to my book group who selected the Constitution for our July read. It's been a great many years since I have read over our Constitution, and I was definitely due for re-reading. In conjunction I also read the Bill of Rights, and all of other amendments that have been made so far, and the Declaration of Independence too. All of this fit super nicely with our family's Washington DC and Philadelphia tours in July. God Bless America!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lashandaw

    THANK YOU James Madison, the 'Father of the US Constitution.' Madison had a vision which created our system of government. We owe a debt of gratitude for Madison's ability to open the door of opportunity for the creation of the Bill of Rights...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Mandatory reading for US citizens. In particular, article 1 section 8, and the 9th and 10th amendments which limit the power of the federal government. The federal government has gone way beyond what is permitted by the constitution.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael J. Long

    Alsome also me book it's the US constitution and for those who favor war all the time I encourage you to read it , it says no war with out a declaration of war , and no getting entangled In alliances

  20. 5 out of 5

    No

    Love the constitution and the bill of rights but i think they left out some golden rules on the issues of race, taxes, and banking. Not to mention that equality is bullshit and you have no natural rights, they are earned and take work to keep and maintain.

  21. 5 out of 5

    La-Shanda

    THANK YOU James Madison, the 'Father of the US Constitution.' Madison had a vision which created our system of government. We owe a debt of gratitude for Madison's ability to open the door of opportunity for the creation of the Bill of Rights...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    Gave each of the boys who did the Citizenship in the Nation merit badge with me one of these. Truly pocket sized. Nice and handy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    James Murphy

    Seriously....Everyone needs to read and re-read this Learning From the Founders!

  24. 5 out of 5

    John

    This is the greatest document ever to guide the government of any nation. Adherence to it will preserve our freedom forever. Now if we can only carry out that adherence!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I think everyone should read this before they die. :)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lyndsie

    We would be doing much better if those in Congress actually read this.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Armando

    The Framers! They were indeed FRAMERS!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jake Danishevsky

    Pocket version. Must have. Easy to carry reference at all times.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan Caba

    Sent this to Donald J. Trump during the campaign. Got no acknowledgement for my gift. Sad.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine Dubroff

    Moving, inspiring, and empowering to read these great words!

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