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Latin America Confronts the United States

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Latin America Confronts the United States offers a new perspective on US-Latin America relations. Drawing on research in six countries, the book examines how Latin American leaders are able to overcome power asymmetries to influence US foreign policy. The book provides in-depth explorations of key moments in post-World War II inter-American relations - foreign economic pol Latin America Confronts the United States offers a new perspective on US-Latin America relations. Drawing on research in six countries, the book examines how Latin American leaders are able to overcome power asymmetries to influence US foreign policy. The book provides in-depth explorations of key moments in post-World War II inter-American relations - foreign economic policy before the Alliance for Progress, the negotiation of the Panama Canal Treaties, the expansion of trade through the North American Free Trade Agreement, and the growth of counternarcotics in Plan Colombia. The new evidence challenges earlier, US-centric explanations of these momentous events. Though differences in power were fundamental to each of these cases, relative weakness did not prevent Latin American leaders from aggressively pursuing their interests vis-�-vis the United States. Drawing on studies of foreign policy and international relations, the book examines how Latin American leaders achieved this influence - and why they sometimes failed.


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Latin America Confronts the United States offers a new perspective on US-Latin America relations. Drawing on research in six countries, the book examines how Latin American leaders are able to overcome power asymmetries to influence US foreign policy. The book provides in-depth explorations of key moments in post-World War II inter-American relations - foreign economic pol Latin America Confronts the United States offers a new perspective on US-Latin America relations. Drawing on research in six countries, the book examines how Latin American leaders are able to overcome power asymmetries to influence US foreign policy. The book provides in-depth explorations of key moments in post-World War II inter-American relations - foreign economic policy before the Alliance for Progress, the negotiation of the Panama Canal Treaties, the expansion of trade through the North American Free Trade Agreement, and the growth of counternarcotics in Plan Colombia. The new evidence challenges earlier, US-centric explanations of these momentous events. Though differences in power were fundamental to each of these cases, relative weakness did not prevent Latin American leaders from aggressively pursuing their interests vis-�-vis the United States. Drawing on studies of foreign policy and international relations, the book examines how Latin American leaders achieved this influence - and why they sometimes failed.

31 review for Latin America Confronts the United States

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

    I read Tom Long's Latin America Confronts the United States: Asymmetry and Influence (2015) which is worth your time (and which I hope gets a paperback edition). His argument is that Latin American foreign policy initiatives have received too little attention, and that they've been strikingly successful in setting the political agenda and achieving policy goals. He uses detailed case studies Operation Pan American, the Panama Canal treaties, NAFTA, and Plan Colombia. There are several things that I read Tom Long's Latin America Confronts the United States: Asymmetry and Influence (2015) which is worth your time (and which I hope gets a paperback edition). His argument is that Latin American foreign policy initiatives have received too little attention, and that they've been strikingly successful in setting the political agenda and achieving policy goals. He uses detailed case studies Operation Pan American, the Panama Canal treaties, NAFTA, and Plan Colombia. There are several things that set the book apart. First, it is based on some excellent fieldwork, with extensive archival research and interviews with key participants. So beyond the analysis itself, it's an interesting read. Second, it is a book about policy makers. In the case of Panama, for example, it's even about an individual (Omar Torrijos) overcoming concerns about Cold War security, which is typically seen as an almost overwhelming structural constraint. Third, coordinated Latin American lobbying matters. This is a variable that Michael Grow uses in his book U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions and which deserves much more attention than it gets. Knowing how to deal with U.S. political institutions (especially Congress) and the public is so important. Fourth, it takes on a lot of existing literature (including my own). Long argues that he is part of an "internationalist" school of thought, versus "establishment" or "revisionist" schools. Both of the latter tend to downplay Latin American agency, albeit for different reasons. That's true, but I think there's actually a lot more potential than Long even gives himself credit for, especially in theoretical terms. More specifically, one point I would've liked to read more about was the critical obstacle Latin American policy makers found in each case. For each, I found the following, in an obviously simplified manner: 1. OPA: overcoming US resistance to providing large amounts of aid 2. Panama Canal: overcoming US concerns about security 3. NAFTA: overcoming US caution about an FTA with a developing country 4. Plan Colombia: overcoming US suspicions of Colombia These are all different, so what strategies mattered most? Some of these are economic, and some are political. This stuff could get modeled on some way that could provide a new strand of literature but also potentially contribute to theories of foreign policy more specifically. Originally at http://weeksnotice.blogspot.com/2016/...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Colin

  3. 4 out of 5

    Collin Fox

  4. 5 out of 5

    Fernando

  5. 4 out of 5

    Luah

  6. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Mucciolo

  7. 4 out of 5

    TypeA

  8. 5 out of 5

    Renan Virginio

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aman

  11. 5 out of 5

    はまたろう はまたろう

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kanav

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kaela

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris Newton

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Ignell

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  17. 5 out of 5

    Fede

  18. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Rossi

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leonardo Castaneda

  21. 5 out of 5

    Campbell

  22. 5 out of 5

    muraguri

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nathalie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  25. 4 out of 5

    Edwin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ben Moberly

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia Wittmer

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gracia Watson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Riley Feldmann

  31. 5 out of 5

    Sarah A.

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