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Shocking Bestseller: The original version of this astonishing tell-all book spent 73 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, has sold more than 1.25 million copies, and has been translated into 32 languages. New Revelations: Featuring 15 explosive new chapters, this expanded edition of Perkins's classic bestseller brings the story of economic hit men (EHMs) up to date Shocking Bestseller: The original version of this astonishing tell-all book spent 73 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, has sold more than 1.25 million copies, and has been translated into 32 languages. New Revelations: Featuring 15 explosive new chapters, this expanded edition of Perkins's classic bestseller brings the story of economic hit men (EHMs) up to date and, chillingly, home to the US. Over 40 percent of the book is new, including chapters identifying today's EHMs and a detailed chronology extensively documenting EHM activity since the first edition was published in 2004. Former economic hit man John Perkins shares new details about the ways he and others cheated countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. Then he reveals how the deadly EHM cancer he helped create has spread far more widely and deeply than ever in the US and everywhere else to become the dominant system of business, government, and society today. Finally, he gives an insider view of what we each can do to change it. Economic hit men are the shock troops of what Perkins calls the corporatocracy, a vast network of corporations, banks, colluding governments, and the rich and powerful people tied to them. If the EHMs can't maintain the corrupt status quo through nonviolent coercion, the jackal assassins swoop in. The heart of this book is a completely new section, over 100 pages long, that exposes the fact that all the EHM and jackal tools false economics, false promises, threats, bribes, extortion, debt, deception, coups, assassinations, unbridled military power are used around the world today exponentially more than during the era Perkins exposed over a decade ago. The material in this new section ranges from the Seychelles, Honduras, Ecuador, and Libya to Turkey, Western Europe, Vietnam, China, and, in perhaps the most unexpected and sinister development, the United States, where the new EHMs bankers, lobbyists, corporate executives, and others con governments and the public into submitting to policies that make the rich richer and the poor poorer. But as dark as the story gets, this reformed EHM also provides hope. Perkins offers a detailed list of specific actions each of us can take to transform what he calls a failing Death Economy into a Life Economy that provides sustainable abundance for all. "


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Shocking Bestseller: The original version of this astonishing tell-all book spent 73 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, has sold more than 1.25 million copies, and has been translated into 32 languages. New Revelations: Featuring 15 explosive new chapters, this expanded edition of Perkins's classic bestseller brings the story of economic hit men (EHMs) up to date Shocking Bestseller: The original version of this astonishing tell-all book spent 73 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, has sold more than 1.25 million copies, and has been translated into 32 languages. New Revelations: Featuring 15 explosive new chapters, this expanded edition of Perkins's classic bestseller brings the story of economic hit men (EHMs) up to date and, chillingly, home to the US. Over 40 percent of the book is new, including chapters identifying today's EHMs and a detailed chronology extensively documenting EHM activity since the first edition was published in 2004. Former economic hit man John Perkins shares new details about the ways he and others cheated countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. Then he reveals how the deadly EHM cancer he helped create has spread far more widely and deeply than ever in the US and everywhere else to become the dominant system of business, government, and society today. Finally, he gives an insider view of what we each can do to change it. Economic hit men are the shock troops of what Perkins calls the corporatocracy, a vast network of corporations, banks, colluding governments, and the rich and powerful people tied to them. If the EHMs can't maintain the corrupt status quo through nonviolent coercion, the jackal assassins swoop in. The heart of this book is a completely new section, over 100 pages long, that exposes the fact that all the EHM and jackal tools false economics, false promises, threats, bribes, extortion, debt, deception, coups, assassinations, unbridled military power are used around the world today exponentially more than during the era Perkins exposed over a decade ago. The material in this new section ranges from the Seychelles, Honduras, Ecuador, and Libya to Turkey, Western Europe, Vietnam, China, and, in perhaps the most unexpected and sinister development, the United States, where the new EHMs bankers, lobbyists, corporate executives, and others con governments and the public into submitting to policies that make the rich richer and the poor poorer. But as dark as the story gets, this reformed EHM also provides hope. Perkins offers a detailed list of specific actions each of us can take to transform what he calls a failing Death Economy into a Life Economy that provides sustainable abundance for all. "

30 review for The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man

  1. 4 out of 5

    Athan Tolis

    My friend Stan is approaching his 50th and in his old age is becoming a bit of a conspiracy theorist. He emailed me a list of books to read, most of which are not easy to find, but Confessions was on it, so I ordered the new, expanded book to see what the fuss is all about. For starters, the “15 explosive new Chapters with new Revelations” are a waste of time. Whereas in the original you find yourself riding with John Perkins in Ecuador, Panama, Iran, Boston, Jakarta and Washington, in the second My friend Stan is approaching his 50th and in his old age is becoming a bit of a conspiracy theorist. He emailed me a list of books to read, most of which are not easy to find, but Confessions was on it, so I ordered the new, expanded book to see what the fuss is all about. For starters, the “15 explosive new Chapters with new Revelations” are a waste of time. Whereas in the original you find yourself riding with John Perkins in Ecuador, Panama, Iran, Boston, Jakarta and Washington, in the second part you’re reading his interpretation of public information and it’s got to be said that this particular reading is covered much better by authors like Glenn Greenwald, Naomi Klein, John Mackey, Jeff Sachs etc. The man has little to add. The first part’s alright, on the other hand. In what is quite a tight narrative, you find out about the life and times of a Robert McNamara / Indiana Jones wannabe as he jumps from the Hilton to the Intercontinental, from Panama to Indonesia, from his wife to his clandestine girlfriend, leaving behind him a trail of destruction. Not quite, but not too far from it either. It’s cool. But it’s also grumpy. It’s basically like that Jim Rogers book with the yellow Mercedes on the front cover, except the guy swaps girls and uses the plane a lot. And rather than buy stocks along the way, he sells electricity projects, basically, and feels very bad about it because these people don’t need electricity, apparently. Oh, and he’s so negative about everything. That’s the downer. The guy feels so guilty, you know. Not guilty enough not to idolize the mythical “jackals” who hop from town to town to execute non-compliant dictators, but, you know, guilty. Which he needn’t be, since none of his actions really matter. The book was fun, but in truth the “Economic Hit Man” was a nobody. Allow me to elaborate on that, through the story of my own country. I was raised in Greece, which was quite genuinely on the frontline of the cold war. Athens was held by armed communists after WWII and the UK military quite officially (NOT clandestinely) joined the defeated Greek nationalist forces to drive the communists out. The “reds” who briefly took over my country were not a figment of somebody’s imagination, they had flesh and bones and Russian weapons. As soon as the civil war ended in favor of the Nationalists, my country was put on a strict diet of US aid, good and bad. Greece became the world’s #1 per capita recipient of Marshall Plan aid. Same as in Latin America, industries were pretty much “given” to the business aristocracy of the land. Loans were extended to Greek businessmen to buy cast-off American manufacturing equipment, for example, with the protection of gigantic tariffs taking care of the fact that the end products would not exactly be cutting edge. Never having originated in Greece, these businesses did not take advantage of my country’s idiosyncrasies and advantages. Extreme examples include a bauxite processing plant in beautiful Delphi (which incidentally still operates thanks to a grant of free energy), refineries and shipping docks in ancient Eleusis, fabrics in Patras etc. The only thing that saved us from the discovery of oil destroying the beautiful Aegean was that the equally enlightened Turkish government laid claim to the discovered oil, thankfully leading to the sensible decision to leave it under the ground where it belongs. Greece was forced to spend an unconscionable percent of GDP on NATO-procured armaments (and remains to this day one of the few members that allocate in excess of 2% to defense) and had a military dictatorship imposed from 1967 to 1974. We even had the odd extrajudicial killing of the kind Perkins describes, with two prominent members of the left (Labrakis and Panagoulis) perishing in suspect traffic accidents immediately before and after this period. In 1974 the US “military industrial complex” failed my country completely. Much as the CIA’s leadership was in cahoots with our military government, it was caught napping by Henry Kissinger as the State Department organized the Turkish invasion of Cyprus without consulting with President Ford or with anybody else until the facts on the ground were fully shaped. Retribution was swift. Greece not being a banana republic (at the time) or geographically located within the mandate of the Monroe doctrine, we proudly kicked out our US-backed dictators, withdrew from NATO and there was very little Uncle Sam could do about it as we went straight into the embrace of the European Economic Community (and then back into the NATO fold, but from a position of relative strength.) In 1981, five months after our new French (pay-)masters, we proudly elected a Socialist government, even. The story since then has of course not been a proud story at all. EU membership afforded to populist governments the funds to nationalize the collapsing hitherto tariff-protected industries, rather than shut them down. Funds meant to be invested in infrastructure transmogrified into several massive entitlements programs that persist today, IMF memoranda notwithstanding. The size of government rose 4-fold. As I’m writing this, the US Federal government only employs twice as many people as the Greek government (yes, that’s very far from a like-for-like comparison, but still!) Finally, membership in the Euro currency union allowed Greece to borrow more money than it will ever be able to repay. What’s the Economic Hit Man got to do with this all? How does my country’s story and the way I lived it counter John Perkins’ simplistic narrative? Every which way, is the short answer. I’ll choose letter N to answer this one. I have three friends called Nikos whose parents would have been direct interlocutors for John Perkins in Greece, had his work for the “military industrial complex” brought him to our shores. Nikos N’s daddy was in the energy industry and the engineer behind several electric power projects, of the kind that electrified my grandparents' house when I was a boy. Nikos K’s daddy was in the tobacco industry and a major beneficiary of the mercantilist economic policies, but also a generous contributor to causes and a very solid employer until tariffs collapsed with our entry to the European Community, laying waste to his empire. Nikos S’s daddy, finally, was by general admission a CIA operative. He had a steady job, but we all knew he was reporting back to his American masters. All are fervent nationalists, excellent family men and have spawned successful children, all of whom received their high school education in Greece, all of whom did some of their studies in the US and more than half of whom now live abroad. None of them has a fortune to show for his efforts or much to answer for, as far as I’m concerned, and that probably includes the CIA informer. With that out of the way and with no further ado, here’s a short list of how John Perkins' findings and confessions collide with my country’s story and my friends’ parents’ stories: 1. The country’s Debt/GDP ratio when we kicked out the Americans was 18%. I’m not saying that’s zero, but it’s a hell of a lot better than the 250% it reached later. Bottom line is because it’s American private companies that sell you the sundry projects / weapons, not the government, it is NOT in the interest of the US to see its allies over-indebted. Au contraire, if you place an order to buy Phantoms in five years’ time, you’d better look after your finances between now and then. By the way, that’s true everywhere, not just for the US. When horrible communist dictator Ceausescu died, there might have been an army of AIDS babies in Romania, but the state was pretty much debt-free. That was almost a condition imposed on its client state by the Soviets. SUMMARY OF THIS POINT: The US has never had a policy of controlling its client states through debt. To the extent that overborrowing occurred in Latin America it was a mistake made by the money center banks and they paid for it dearly. 2. There is absolutely nothing wrong with building roads and electrical plants in poor countries. Electrification is as close as you can get to a “fundamental right” in our days. I remember life in my grandparents’ house before electricity and I’ll sum it up in one word: dysentery. Similarly, India’s progress today is mainly halted by the absence of a road network. The Chinese are having to choose between the environment and electrification and it’s no contest. If somebody is offering you a loan to build your first electrical plant or an important trunk road, TAKE IT. And my friend Nikos N’s daddy is a national hero, as far as I’m concerned, for designing and building those plants. 3. Absolute right and wrong is a luxury in a world of scarcity and limited choice. Yes, my country did not only benefit from being a US semi-protectorate between 1948 and 1974. We took the rough with the smooth. But a quick look at the lasting predicament of our northern neighbors (Albania, Yugoslavia and Bulgaria) and the Yugoslavian civil war of 1992-94, especially, makes it patently clear we got by far the better of the two deals available. And if that meant we had to do some things to appease the military industrial complex, if that means a few of us had to work for the CIA, even, it’s a sad state of affairs, but you are only allowed to consider in the context of your alternatives. 4. How is proud, sovereign, European Greece doing right now? How did Sarah Palin put it? The hopey-changey thing did not work out for us, did it? Under the Americans we knew what we were giving up, of course. But the EU was not exactly something for nothing. A priori, what Perkins is saying sounds wonderful. Hell, in principle I agree with him. In practice it looks very different. We wasted our sovereignty. With this little rant over, I must say I enjoyed his “Grumpy Jim Rogers” thing and I actually learned tons from it. Like, I don’t for one second doubt that his employer and Bechtel and Halliburton were at some point in time the tail wagging the dog of American foreign policy. Even if that’s mainly because foreign policy is not very important to the US, it is regardless quite interesting and the detail offered here is quite extensive. Names and addresses! And perhaps when the original book came out it was a surprise for people to hear that the US made the Bin Ladens. Also, I know terribly little about Latin American politics. I had no idea Panama was once the northern tip of Colombia. Manuel Noriega was to me a villain with bad acne who once did terrible things with a Coke bottle. Now I know he was a CIA informer for 20 years and that the CIA disposed of him rather ruthlessly when he turned against his masters. My feelings toward him and his acne are not much changed, but my bank of knowledge has expanded. In summary, the first part of this book is a fun read if you can stand the author’s negativity, but it’s not all it’s trumped up to be. The second part of the book you should skip. P.S. If I never hear about the Pachamama Alliance again, it might still be too soon

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bookshark

    I'm fairly sympathetic to the author's apparent political persuasions, and I'm sure at least some of this book is true, but it comes across as exaggerated and even paranoid. For instance, it was clear to me that what he portrays as a conspiratorial industry payoff (the cushy consulting job offer supposedly in exchange for his silence) is just him being paranoid about his employer wanting to protect the company's reputation. Is attempting to pre-empt whisteblowing with non-disclosure agreements y I'm fairly sympathetic to the author's apparent political persuasions, and I'm sure at least some of this book is true, but it comes across as exaggerated and even paranoid. For instance, it was clear to me that what he portrays as a conspiratorial industry payoff (the cushy consulting job offer supposedly in exchange for his silence) is just him being paranoid about his employer wanting to protect the company's reputation. Is attempting to pre-empt whisteblowing with non-disclosure agreements yet another way that mega-corporations obscure their wrongdoing? Undoubtedly. But it's hardly a conspiracy and it seems unlikely the he was offered the job specifically in order to bribe him into silence. In general he attributes too much calculating intentionality to the other actors in this story, when self-interested pursuit of wealth unchecked by conscience, unintended consequences, and problematic institutional structures seem to explain most of it pretty well without requiring recourse to any more sophisticated motives. He never really overcame my initial skepticism. The author himself does not come across as terribly likeable - he does horrible things and then feels guilty but he keeps getting drawn back in and seems to think writing a book will fix everything; he plays up his own importance (I wonder if the world leaders he met even remember him? Also I doubt the CIA/black ops "jackals" give a shit about his book); he is overly credulous; he got ahead not by talent but by being willing to be more dishonest than everyone else; he tries to present himself as special because he deigned to talk to the locals. It also doesn't seem like this book needed an update - I kind of regret contributing to his transparent money grab by buying the audiobook. There were some interesting anecdotes here but honestly I think you're better off reading a real history that would cover global politics, U.S. intervention, the misdeeds of international institutions like the IMF and world bank, corporate malfeasance, etc. in a more evidence-based and comprehensive way.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mal Warwick

    No one but the most hard-bitten defender of U.S. foreign policy would deny that the United States dominates a global empire bigger than any other in human history and that we have employed highly questionable and often illegal means to build it. In The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, author John Perkins explains some of the tactics at the root of America’s empire-building project. His book is based on decades of personal experience. Perkins analyzes those tactics — in a word, the insidio No one but the most hard-bitten defender of U.S. foreign policy would deny that the United States dominates a global empire bigger than any other in human history and that we have employed highly questionable and often illegal means to build it. In The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, author John Perkins explains some of the tactics at the root of America’s empire-building project. His book is based on decades of personal experience. Perkins analyzes those tactics — in a word, the insidious application of economic pressure backed by the threat of military action or even assassination — in a truly compelling account of his personal history. Anyone who seeks to understand how the United States came to have its far-reaching role in global affairs today should read this book. Latter-day colonialism Early in the 1970s Perkins was recruited by the National Security Agency but, at the urging of his recruiter, elected instead to take a job in private industry with a low-key Boston-based international consulting firm. There he played the role of an economist, although his only academic qualification to do so was an MBA. Perkins thrived in the new job, quickly rising through the ranks to become Chief Economist and the youngest partner in the firm’s 100-year history. As Perkins explains, his job was simple: to inflate the numbers in his projections about the economic benefits that would accrue from the construction of massive electrical generating projects designed by his company. As his mentor explained to him in the clearest of terms, he would become an “economic hit man” (EHM), one of a number of “highly paid professionals who cheat countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars.” He would accomplish this by encouraging “world leaders to become part of a vast network that promotes US commercial interests.” Perkins adds that “[i]f we faltered, a more malicious form of hit man, the jackal, would step to the plate. And if the jackals failed, then the job fell to the military.” The specific purpose of Perkins’ exaggerated projections was to induce developing nations to sign up for enormous loans from the World Bank, USAID, and other U.S-controlled financial institutions. These loans would be used to pay high prices for construction and consulting services by U.S. companies, thus ensuring that virtually all the loan money came right back home. Since the projections would inevitably prove to be faulty, the loans would become unpayable after a few years, leaving the leaders of those countries in hock to the United States and incapable of denying its wishes. The result was that, against their will, the affected countries would be forced to host military bases, vote with the U.S. at the United Nations, and otherwise act much the same as they would if they were colonies of a European power. Updating the story The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man is an updated and enlarged edition of Perkins’ 2004 New York Times bestseller, which sold 1.25 million copies and was translated into 32 languages. The new version is significantly different from the original. Thirty-three of the book’s 47 chapters are in Parts I through IV, which describe the author’s life and work from 1963 to 2004. These chapters are substantially the same as they were in the original, although Perkins has added detail that was lacking. Chapters 15 and 16, which describe the Faustian bargain between the United States and Saudi Arabia, strike me as especially important. If you’re wondering why the U.S. ignores the inexcusable mistreatment of women in Saudi Arabia, or why our government secretly flew all the members of the bin Laden family back home immediately after 9/11, you’ll understand once you’ve read these chapters. The concluding 14 chapters, Part V, 2004-Today, are entirely new; they add nearly a third to the book. Although Part V includes a fair amount of narrative about Perkins’ own experiences since 2004, it’s dominated by the concluding six chapters, which consist of Perkins’ analysis and his recommendations for “Things to Do.” It was in Part V that I found myself disappointed. When does a writer know when to stop? Perkins’ account of his experiences as an economic hit man is compelling. The details he relates about face-to-face meetings with coworkers and dissidents alike are impossible to dismiss: I too have traveled a good deal around the world, especially in developing countries, and I’ve had similar experiences along the way. And I’ve observed first-hand some of the diabolical practices he describes. However, when Perkins strays from his story and struggles to place it in a larger historical context, he comes up short. Parts I through IV tell a great story, and it’s well told. A few of the chapters in Part V help bring that story up to date. Perkins’ use of the term “economic hit man” beautifully points to the truth behind the work he did, work that so many others have engaged in. However, Perkins expands the definition of EHMs to include corporate executives, investment bankers, lawyers, and lobbyists at work in the United States today. This exercise stretches the term beyond the breaking point. Without question, our society suffers greatly from “skyrocketing student debt caused by state and federal cuts in public education, the constantly increasing medical debt resulting from deficient national health care and insurance policies, predatory payday loans, tax laws that subsidize a few of the richest at the expense of the many, and the outsourcing of jobs to other countries.” But to claim that all these problems result from the work of economic hit men makes no sense. Our society is far too complex, and our problems can’t be explained away so easily. Perkins would have been better advised to stick to his story and avoid reaching into areas where his personal experience is lacking. The concluding chapters “What You Can Do” and “Things to Do” compound the problem by suggesting a laundry list of irrelevant or trivial suggestions that readers might follow to right the world’s wrongs. For example, Perkins recommends that students “Understand your passions” and “Join organizations.” The book would have been stronger without this sort of thing. Disclaimers (plural) John Perkins and I go back a long way. When he arrived in Ecuador with his first wife in 1968 to begin service in the Peace Corps, I had been in-country for nearly three years. I even have a vague memory of meeting him sometime during that last year of my Volunteer service. We reconnected, probably in the 1990s or early 2000s, when we met at a conference of the Social Venture Network, of which we were both members. We found ourselves in the same room again in 2003 or 20004 at Berrett-Koehler, the publisher we share, in the run-up to the publication of the original Confessions of an Economic Hit Man. John was there to meet with the publisher’s staff in preparation for the book’s release, and I was working on a series of books about socially responsible business. Then, last year, I was retained by Berrett-Koehler as one of several advance reviewers to critique a draft of the book. The final product is different from the version I read then, but not nearly enough to suit me, since I criticized the manuscript in much the same manner as I have the finished book in this review. (I had a few additional complaints that I won’t share here, because I’ve said enough.) Relating all this information serves two purposes: first, to make my bias clear; and, second, to attest to John’s credibility. His book might seem a stretch, but knowing him as I do, I would be astonished if it weren’t all true, a few errant memories and minor errors of fact notwithstanding. I find fault with the book only in his free-wheeling historical analysis. The loud objections that issued forth from establishment circles in response to the original edition of the book only served to confirmed the essential truths behind his story. About the author John Perkins has written or edited four nonfiction books about the experiences and issues described here, plus five books about shamanism and indigenous cultures, largely based on his experiences in the Amazon and the Andes.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Charlene

    Far too sensational and the author blames his parents for everything. He whines * a lot*. Overall, the book had some interesting parts but it was just far too annoying to be enjoyable. I think this book would appeal to people who prefer fiction over non-fiction.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kaelan Ratcliffe▪Κάϊλαν Ράτκλιφ▪كايِلان راتكِليف

    The Hitmen and the Jackals This is a mixed bag for sure. I came close to giving it a three star, but pulled back after reading the documentation record at the back. I'm glad I stay by my own motto when it comes to reading: there's always something to be learned. The positives and negatives are pretty polarising here, however, the former of the two stand out a mile ahead than the later. At least in my view. Perkins was an insider, you really can't get closer than that when it comes to reading The Hitmen and the Jackals This is a mixed bag for sure. I came close to giving it a three star, but pulled back after reading the documentation record at the back. I'm glad I stay by my own motto when it comes to reading: there's always something to be learned. The positives and negatives are pretty polarising here, however, the former of the two stand out a mile ahead than the later. At least in my view. Perkins was an insider, you really can't get closer than that when it comes to reading about concentrated power. As such, there's some real gems here that are very insightful and useful when it comes to understanding what's being implemented up in the echelons of multinational corporate power. This expanded addition really opens up more on what's happening in this decade also, the rise of China being a big one. The negatives are that Perkins is - to be truthful and blunt - not a great writer. I say this from the heart as I have never written a book, so can't really throw stones from my glass house, however it does play a factor within these pages with regards to trusting and recommend this to others. There are moments when reading this book that I found myself slightly overwhelmed by Perkins apparent omnipotence to events taking place in his life. He infuses a lot of sensational and borderline psychic aspects to his chapters, and it does feel as though he is trying to achieve two things. 1. Redemption through writing. 2. Convey the horror of 'the system' as simply as possible to uninitiated readers (people he clearly wants to read his book the most). As such, it does take some wilful ignorance to just act as though every encounter he describes in this book was an eye opening experience for himself, or that (for the hundreth time), he felt debilitating guilt at every turn and day that went by during his former EHM years. It made me sceptical of this account especially when he recreates dialogue that practically sounds James Bond villianesque at times (see point 2. above as to why I think this is). It gets in the way of telling a conciece, unexposed truth, when, as an author, you are unable to withhold your desire to remind your reader how guilty you feel within nearly every chapter of your book. It's exhausting. However, this IS something I can see myself recommending to a few people who really don't follow anything remotely like what Perkins highlights. Also, the documentation at the end of the book - as mentioned above - is a treasure trove of interesting articles regarding corporate greed, indebted nations and banker swindling that I will be looking at well after closing this. Other recommended books to present to people who may be in need of a wake up: 1. Against Empire - Michael Parenti 2. A Peoples History of the United States - Howard Zinn 3. America: The Farewell Tour - Chris Hedges

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Stunning book. If one of your questions to the world is 'what is wrong with you?', this book is the answer. I'm sure other reviews will give you some spoilers, but this is a fantastic update from his original blockbuster that gave the inside scoop on globalism. There is something great about the ability to 'fast forward' from a decade ago and see how Perkins has matured, what he has done since then, and his recommendations going forward, since back then there didn't seem to be too much one could Stunning book. If one of your questions to the world is 'what is wrong with you?', this book is the answer. I'm sure other reviews will give you some spoilers, but this is a fantastic update from his original blockbuster that gave the inside scoop on globalism. There is something great about the ability to 'fast forward' from a decade ago and see how Perkins has matured, what he has done since then, and his recommendations going forward, since back then there didn't seem to be too much one could do.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Peter (Pete) Mcloughlin

    You know corporation and US agencies are into dirty stuff. Everybody knows that. It isn't reported nearly enough but people do have an inkling of some of the dirty tricks by corporations and the US government. The author was one of those malefactors and describes in detail how these people criminally destroy economies and kill anyone who won't play ball. It is something we know goes on in the back of our minds but would rather not think about. Well, this book makes you think about it. I recommen You know corporation and US agencies are into dirty stuff. Everybody knows that. It isn't reported nearly enough but people do have an inkling of some of the dirty tricks by corporations and the US government. The author was one of those malefactors and describes in detail how these people criminally destroy economies and kill anyone who won't play ball. It is something we know goes on in the back of our minds but would rather not think about. Well, this book makes you think about it. I recommend people read this to see how far gone we are.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Feyzan - The Raven Boy

    Make America great again? Well, this book is a written prove that America was never great. It tells the tale of how America spread capitalism and her self serving ideologies by sword in the rest of the world, and how capitalism has become the bigger evil than America that will stop at nothing until it has swallowed everything in its way. For most of history America believed that it was controlling the world without realizing that by forcing her supremacy she was too getting entangled in the web o Make America great again? Well, this book is a written prove that America was never great. It tells the tale of how America spread capitalism and her self serving ideologies by sword in the rest of the world, and how capitalism has become the bigger evil than America that will stop at nothing until it has swallowed everything in its way. For most of history America believed that it was controlling the world without realizing that by forcing her supremacy she was too getting entangled in the web of chaos and destruction that is corporatocracy - a group of world's most powerful organizations using unethical, immoral tactics to exploit developing nations for their resources. There is an invisible hand at play that is controlling every part of our lives. John Perkins was part of the system, controlled by the invisible hand, and therefore this book holds credibility.  It is one of the most great exposé of our times. It's a book that everyone should read and pounder over. We are on the brink of extinction and America has played a greater role in bringing us here. It's time for us to stop and think how we are letting this big corporations and powerful nations exploit us. It's the only way we can save humanity. The rise of China is a threat to entire world cos she is replicating a crippled American system to achieve world dominance and it will only take us deeper into the pit of economic hell. There are two type of people in this world: one who believe in whatever politicians and media is feeding them and second who question everything. This book is obviously for the latter. When we can't tell the difference between truth and conspiracy theory we look towards media to reveal the truth but even  media is being  controlled by corporatocracy. The game is rigged and we couldn't do anything about it until now.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Wesley

    I don't typically rate books, but this book does a phenomenal job at explaining the current state of the world. It connects the dots that some have tried to do, but lack the insight and first hand experience of Perkins. Not an author/journalist by trade, there a couple "that could have been stately much better" moments.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    The "confession" does not sound to me as a sincere one. The arguments are vague and weak. Abandoning the book on 15%.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kacper

    the author suggests we all chip in to save the environment. okay, dude, good thinking, I wish I thought of it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Wow!!!!! It is difficult to condense this book into a precise review. I will say that as funny as it sounds, this book was a life changer for me. The first two thirds of Perkins writing are detailed accounts of his life and career as an Economic Hit Man. I found a strong connect to Perkins for a couple of reasons. #1 While I was a young teen attending Jr. High School in the Panama Canal Zone, Perkins was working to persuade General Omar Torrijos of Panama to align himself with the U.S. When Torri Wow!!!!! It is difficult to condense this book into a precise review. I will say that as funny as it sounds, this book was a life changer for me. The first two thirds of Perkins writing are detailed accounts of his life and career as an Economic Hit Man. I found a strong connect to Perkins for a couple of reasons. #1 While I was a young teen attending Jr. High School in the Panama Canal Zone, Perkins was working to persuade General Omar Torrijos of Panama to align himself with the U.S. When Torrijos didn't cooperate, he suddenly died in a fiery plan crash. #2 In retrospect, I, like Perkins, have realized that my career was driven by greed, ego, and so many other facets that I now regret. The last third of this book is the most inspiring. Perkins tells us the difference between a death economy and a life economy. He lists ideas for us to contribute to a life economy. I finished the book feeling challenged and even more revolutionary than ever. I highly recommend the audio version. It is narrated by the author himself. I plan to read more of his work.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Reisa

    read the translated version of The Confession of an Economic Hit Man in college and, with my practically zero knowledge of economy and politics at the time, failed to understand nearly half of it. Decided to try again now, in its original language in hope to understand it better, and found this newer, revised edition. This book exhausted me, both physically and mentally. it's only half-biography so i guess it's excused from its far too detailed recollections like the color of one's suit in an enc read the translated version of The Confession of an Economic Hit Man in college and, with my practically zero knowledge of economy and politics at the time, failed to understand nearly half of it. Decided to try again now, in its original language in hope to understand it better, and found this newer, revised edition. This book exhausted me, both physically and mentally. it's only half-biography so i guess it's excused from its far too detailed recollections like the color of one's suit in an encounter nearly 10 years in the past or how one's expression changed as they speak of particular subject. At certain point, the fiction-ish narrative makes the content easier to digest, but furthermore it watered down the "true story" sense of it. This is a great book for understanding the basics of corporatocracy, but it feels much too dramatized, too much coincidence to be entirely true. Still an interesting book tho.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bennett Reiss

    I personally found this book riveting from start to finish. John Perkin's is an incredible writer who has some amazing experiences. I would highly recommend anyone struggling with the accepting the way the modern world and institutions function to give this book a read. Keep an open mind and realize Perkin's is speaking / writing to you from the heart.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sivasothi N.

    John Perkins shares his experiences as a series of short and readable chapters, without suffocating you in the complexity of the economics. The referencing allows you to catch up. So it's manageable and engaging – I finished the 47 chapters in a day and loved the sweep suggestions at the end; it makes it just a little less depressing. If you lived through the 80's to the present, and are politically aware, you will read this with both indignation or resignation as it all makes sense. It explains John Perkins shares his experiences as a series of short and readable chapters, without suffocating you in the complexity of the economics. The referencing allows you to catch up. So it's manageable and engaging – I finished the 47 chapters in a day and loved the sweep suggestions at the end; it makes it just a little less depressing. If you lived through the 80's to the present, and are politically aware, you will read this with both indignation or resignation as it all makes sense. It explains the disparate incidents, urbanisation and environmental destruction, assassination and blatant invasions - all in a nice package. I had felt at the time that the invasion of Panama was the most ridiculous and everything after just got worse. But I was not clear about shenanigans in South America and this caught me up. The US reputation at the end of WW2 was very solid. Then came the greed of empire building through predatory capitalism. The application of 'fear and debt' as the two powerful tools of an empire deployed by economic hitmen who were the first layer in a three prong approach of increasing overtness: assassinations or coups and war. All this simply replaced colonialism as human nature makes history John Perkins uses a few phrases to describe all this - a death economy which ravages environment and culture through a strategy of predatory capitalism because people believe ‘trickle down economy works’, to the joy of the corporatocracy. His last section is the "new" bit, covering the period from 2004 to 2016. And if anything, he is amazed by the blatancy and aggression of modern EHM right to the doorstep of the average American. I think its a worthwhile catchup up for readers of the original book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Makki

    This book is a must read. Not only does it explain the U.S’s tactics to control sovereign states, but it also exposes readers to so much happening in the world from an entirely different perspective.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    There are two parts to this book. The first part detailed the author's past life as an Economic Hit Man. He used to make exaggerated economic forecasts that justified loans from rich countries to poor countries. The poor countries will then pay companies from the rich counties to build projects. So the money boomeranged back, but the poor country was left to pay the debt. Eventually the poor countries end up as debt slaves to the rich ones, albeit with some electrify, new roads and airport. He a There are two parts to this book. The first part detailed the author's past life as an Economic Hit Man. He used to make exaggerated economic forecasts that justified loans from rich countries to poor countries. The poor countries will then pay companies from the rich counties to build projects. So the money boomeranged back, but the poor country was left to pay the debt. Eventually the poor countries end up as debt slaves to the rich ones, albeit with some electrify, new roads and airport. He alleged that if the leaders of the poor countries did not comply, the Jackals (CIA people) would be sent in to assasinat them, or remove them through a coup. The second part described his analysis of the current globalized capitalism. He describes the IMF and World Bank as evil organizations that perpetuate the enslavement of emerging economies. In the author's ideal world, the poor countries will remain as they are, with unspoiled nature and continue with their lifestyle. He advocated that all of us in the developed world must simplify our lifestyles because we are causing all these because of our materialism. It is a great book that sets me thinking all the time: what is the alternative? People who work for the IMF and World Bank must surely be shocked by how they are portrayed in this book. Are all economic progress worthless then? To even read this book that is written by him, an American, printed in the U.K. only to arrive by ship to Singapore, and then to read it in the comfort of my home in air conditioned comfort, and bright light with uninterrupted electricity, seems to me that what he is proposing is simply not correct. That is because without globalization and capitalism I will not even be able to read his book! So I don't agree with his conclusion but do enjoy the deep thinking he had elicited in my mind.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This is an eye-opening account of how massive international organizations (USAID, World Bank, IMF, corporations) rig the aid system to benefit themselves and a few leaders in deveoping countries, while screwing over the rest of the population with debt that can't be paid back and "development" projects that rob them of land and resources. Hence the term "economic hitman." Despite the heavy topic, the book is written in a captivating style that makes it hard to put down. Perkins is a Returned Pea This is an eye-opening account of how massive international organizations (USAID, World Bank, IMF, corporations) rig the aid system to benefit themselves and a few leaders in deveoping countries, while screwing over the rest of the population with debt that can't be paid back and "development" projects that rob them of land and resources. Hence the term "economic hitman." Despite the heavy topic, the book is written in a captivating style that makes it hard to put down. Perkins is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer and has spend his whole life in international development, making for some incredible stories to tell. But I have two criticisms. Fist - Perkins is the king of humble bragging. He writes about himself as a globe-trotting playboy business tycoon but also wants readers to know that he feels really bad about all the damage his work has done. He constantly laments the dark side of his field, but didn't make any actual changes to his behavior until much later in life. I guess that's human nature, but man did it get annoying to hear him feel bad for himself over and over. Secondly, some the chapters felt very padded and unnecessary. My guess is these are some the ones added for the new edition of the book. Perkins' strength is writing about countries he worked directly in, but his writing in other places was a bit vaguer and less engaging. Despite some flaws, I'd highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in international development work.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Giulia Cavallari

    The middle section, between the end of the 'old' book (Confessions of an economic hit man - which I liked as a newbie to non-fiction), and the bibliography, is nearly umberable. The author rambles about we must do good, and here is how I redeemed myself from my EHM career and washed my sins away - through a "dreams come true" foundation, promoting a "love is all you need" lifestyle. Please rich white man, you don't want to fool poors and disadvantaged twice, do you? What I enjoyed about this boo The middle section, between the end of the 'old' book (Confessions of an economic hit man - which I liked as a newbie to non-fiction), and the bibliography, is nearly umberable. The author rambles about we must do good, and here is how I redeemed myself from my EHM career and washed my sins away - through a "dreams come true" foundation, promoting a "love is all you need" lifestyle. Please rich white man, you don't want to fool poors and disadvantaged twice, do you? What I enjoyed about this book is the last 25%, dedicated to bibliography and references. In the kindle version you can click on the articles and you'll be sent to the links.

  20. 5 out of 5

    McGrouchpants, Ltd.

    Great! Fills in a lot of "blank spots on the map"; otherwise, we'd be groping blind, stuck in guesswork, as to what's been happening for the past half-century. Period. IMHO.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Grant

    Every American citizen should read this book. Some people find it too far fetched; I'm not one of them.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ana Maria Gach

    Every single human should read this book, but beware, it will completely alter how you see the world after.

  23. 4 out of 5

    K.A. Ashcomb

    This is one of those books you like, or you don't; think is full of conspiracy theories and farfetched accounts, or you believe it. In one word, it will arouse feelings of anger towards the subject or the author. It is a personal account, working as an overseas energy consultant for Main from the sixties onward until Perkins couldn't do what he did any longer and quit as he himself put just when the time was right.  John Perkins is not an easily likable guy. While his consciousness is killing him This is one of those books you like, or you don't; think is full of conspiracy theories and farfetched accounts, or you believe it. In one word, it will arouse feelings of anger towards the subject or the author. It is a personal account, working as an overseas energy consultant for Main from the sixties onward until Perkins couldn't do what he did any longer and quit as he himself put just when the time was right.  John Perkins is not an easily likable guy. While his consciousness is killing him, he continues working for the firm and doing their dirty work even after he realizes what he is doing, and not because Perkins fears for his life, but because of money, the lifestyle, it is what he does, and not knowing how to leave. But we can question his motives, we can even dislike him, we can blame his naivety or the fact that he blames his parents for the shortcomings of his character and so on, but that is getting hung up with him instead of the story he is telling. That is that US political and economic powers are influencing other sovereign countries with their money lending and policy-making to pump the money from the poor people of other countries to the pockets of dictators and US companies and their CEOs. Perkins insists that they are doing this with good consciousness, knowing that their money lending will enslave the people and make them worse off from the little they have. They do this by first boosting the economy with loan money, building power plants (with American contractors, so truly no money goes to the target country, but back to the US) and then when the free money ends and things get sticky, they insist the government privatize central assets like Oil, mining, telephone networks, healthcare... the list is endless, and who do you think buys those contracts and profits from them—you guessed right, not the poor people of the country. No, they keep living under minimum wage, some having to resort to prostitution to support their families, and you can imagine the rest. What Perkins is trying to do with his own confession is to show people what this hegemony building the US did and does do to the relationship with others (if we ignore the poor and suffering and the trees cut down because of oil fields.) If we look at the current state of the world, Perkins paints a different picture of what happened in the last decade and what is happening now. He ponders these in the second part of the book based on his own accounts, which is the addition to the first version of the Confessions of an Economic Hitman. So what to think? You can dislike John Perkins, you can think he is a conspiracy theorist and ignore him, but stop for a second to look through his lenses and see if there is something you might reconsider. That is all he is asking. And he is singing the same tune as Naomi Klein and Noam Chomsky and others. So he is not alone with what he is trying to tell us.  Thank you for reading! Have an enlightened day!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kes

    I wondered if this was fiction or non-fiction at some points, but I have to admire the author's ability to write. Basically, the author was an economist. He would fly into a developing country, convince them to take out loans in order to develop their infrastructure, and the debt from those loans would keep them beholden to the private company / the world bank / the American government. He would overinflate his figures to encourage the developing company to overextend themselves into debt. The Am I wondered if this was fiction or non-fiction at some points, but I have to admire the author's ability to write. Basically, the author was an economist. He would fly into a developing country, convince them to take out loans in order to develop their infrastructure, and the debt from those loans would keep them beholden to the private company / the world bank / the American government. He would overinflate his figures to encourage the developing company to overextend themselves into debt. The American government would support the private corporation behind-the-scenes. It's an interesting look into the way the world works, and he brings up interesting examples which he worked on - for example, the US Treasury encouraging the Saudi Arabians to develop and spending their oil money - but the technology that the Saudis would use would be grounded in US, necessitating a long term relationship. From a 2010s perspective, this feels like a normal state of events, and the author's doom-and-gloom felt a little hyperbolic. I did like this exchange: "Why are we telling you all this, Mr. Perkins?" Doc's voice was even more hoarse than before, as if the effort of speaking and the emotions were draining what little energy the man had mustered for this meeting. "Because we'd like to convince you to get out and persuade your company to stay away from our country. We want to warn you that although you may think you'll make a great deal of money here, it's an illusion. This government will not last." Again, I heard the sound of his hand thudding against the chair. "And when it goes, the one that replaces it will have no sympathy for you and your kind." "You're saying we won't be paid?" I was amused by that - I would have understood Doc as threatening Perkins' life, but the concern is still about being paid. I did like his observations about Latin America - the CIA assassinations, and the observation that even though the coups sometimes failed, they did a good job of bringing governments to heed through fear. Perkins belief is that countries are brought to heel through two things: fear and debt. I also liked that he was able to point out that other countries feared America - both their military and economic power; although he believes that it will not last. So it's an interesting book, especially the first half.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Casebolt

    The post-WWII Pax Americana has been an unprecedented era of power and prosperity for the United States of America. Flareups such as Latin American coups and assassinations, the Iranian revolution of 1979, the Gulf Wars, 9/11, and even the 2008 global recession have never seriously threatened American dominance. In this new edition of John Perkins's book, he recounts his underground role in constructing and defending this new economic order, a global commercial empire built on debt and blood, ex The post-WWII Pax Americana has been an unprecedented era of power and prosperity for the United States of America. Flareups such as Latin American coups and assassinations, the Iranian revolution of 1979, the Gulf Wars, 9/11, and even the 2008 global recession have never seriously threatened American dominance. In this new edition of John Perkins's book, he recounts his underground role in constructing and defending this new economic order, a global commercial empire built on debt and blood, executed by global lending institutions such as the World Bank, and enforced by the American intelligence communities and military for the benefit of a handful of massive and transnational corporations. Perkin's book is profoundly unsettling in its assertion that many of the conflicts of the past 70 years are actions of and reactions against one of the most powerful and destructive world empires in history: America. This is not the ideal toward which the average American wants to strive, nor the image Americans want to have of themselves. This, in fact, is Perkins's point: that the American dream is no longer the property of the average citizen. The system has been hijacked by a national and global elite who have effectively purchased the American government, using it to drain the world's wealth into the coffers of the wealthiest individuals in history, at tremendous human and environmental cost. Perkins is clearly a man who has struggled with guilt over his role in bending world leaders and governments to will of his corporate masters. His chosen path of self-redemption has been a turn to Buddhist philosophy and grassroots activism, and many of his recommendations for righting the ship will strike certain readers as hippy flower-child nonsense. Such a reader should be careful to recognize that, whether or not one buys into Perkins's path, it is a path he's chosen because of the tremendous burden of guilt he's borne. The brute fact of his guilty conscience lends credence to his accounts of how he helped bend the needs of the many to the will of the few. This is a book well worth reading for a dark yet thoughtful look inside the halls of power and wealth few of us will ever see.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Moses Hetfield

    This book was a bit too conspiratorial and melodramatic for my taste, in a way that often made John Perkins seem less credible, but many of its broader themes ring true. In this memoir of sorts, Perkins claims to have been hired by an NSA contractor to be an "economic hitman" in charge of ensnaring developing nations in debt for the benefit of multinational corporations. He views the IMF and World Bank as evil institutions designed by corporations to plunder poor countries by any means necessary This book was a bit too conspiratorial and melodramatic for my taste, in a way that often made John Perkins seem less credible, but many of its broader themes ring true. In this memoir of sorts, Perkins claims to have been hired by an NSA contractor to be an "economic hitman" in charge of ensnaring developing nations in debt for the benefit of multinational corporations. He views the IMF and World Bank as evil institutions designed by corporations to plunder poor countries by any means necessary. I've read enough Noam Chomsky to understand how institutions like these can serve a neocolonial purpose, and Perkins is certainly correct about the United States' history of undermining democracy abroad by sponsoring coups and assassinations. However, the massive conspiracy of malevolent actors that Perkins describes seems more like something designed to sell books than to reflect reality. Many of the real actions that Perkins discusses can be adequately explained with aims to "protect American interests" or, in countries receiving aid, to "promote fiscal responsibility." I think that these goals are sometimes over-prioritized at the expense of, say, poverty alleviation and environmental sustainability, that efforts made to promote these goals are often counterproductive, and that corporate greed unduly influences many of these decisions. I remain unconvinced that this represents a coordinated "economic hit man system" where all of the perpetrators (corporations, intelligence agencies, NGOs, etc) are in cahoots to leech off the rest of the world.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    This book was a fascinating look into the role that US economic actors play in politics around the world. Told from the perspective of someone who was heavily involved in scheming against and preying on developing countries, I learned a lot of history that is not commonly talked about. While infuriating, the descriptions of the United States' conduct did not surprise my "always questioning the system" brain. I feel smarter and better informed after reading this book, but at the same time I despis This book was a fascinating look into the role that US economic actors play in politics around the world. Told from the perspective of someone who was heavily involved in scheming against and preying on developing countries, I learned a lot of history that is not commonly talked about. While infuriating, the descriptions of the United States' conduct did not surprise my "always questioning the system" brain. I feel smarter and better informed after reading this book, but at the same time I despised the author. The author spent his young life lying and deceiving people and ended up becoming a very wealthy multi-billionaire. He then writes a book about it and probably made an excessive amount of money. Then he writes an "updated" book from 2004-2016 and probably made even more money. Sure the author has started a non-profit or two, but he still hasn't really done much to create real change except for talking (and no doubt getting speaker fees from) about how terrible of a person he was. Regardless of how I feel about the author, I appreciate that the final chapters in this "updated" book end on a high note on how everyone can do their part to create a "Life Economy".

  28. 5 out of 5

    Omama.

    This book has described the four pillars of modern empire: fear, debt, insufficiency, divide-and-conquer mindset. The idea that anything and everything is justified; coups and assassinations, drone strikes, CIA eavesdropping, toppling over world economies; and most specifically US invading anywhere with even a barrel of oil. Personally, I felt like this book was a bit of an ego trip for John Perkins. He's admitted himself, his actions brought misery to millions of people around the world, yet he' This book has described the four pillars of modern empire: fear, debt, insufficiency, divide-and-conquer mindset. The idea that anything and everything is justified; coups and assassinations, drone strikes, CIA eavesdropping, toppling over world economies; and most specifically US invading anywhere with even a barrel of oil. Personally, I felt like this book was a bit of an ego trip for John Perkins. He's admitted himself, his actions brought misery to millions of people around the world, yet he's portrayed himself as a victim of the same system; while earning very large salaries. If you want to learn more about the history of Latin America, I'd suggest to read some history books. The book's tone didn't seem mature at all. The writer's trying to give an impression like he's being part of some really big plan, but his evidences and arguments didn't seem to add up. Ps: I hated writer's whining about everything, and blaming his parents for every single thing going wrong in his adulthood and even afterwards.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tõnu Vahtra

    I was hoping for more unexpected findings from this book but it was mostly about common knowledge (Panama Papers or No Place to Hide for example were much more engaging books). There was some new information about the backstories of developing countries/regions (Ecuador, Panama, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, Iraq). The role of economic forecasts projecting major sustainable growth after massive infrastructure development. Those activities are financed by IMF/other international institutions and the m I was hoping for more unexpected findings from this book but it was mostly about common knowledge (Panama Papers or No Place to Hide for example were much more engaging books). There was some new information about the backstories of developing countries/regions (Ecuador, Panama, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, Iraq). The role of economic forecasts projecting major sustainable growth after massive infrastructure development. Those activities are financed by IMF/other international institutions and the money goes to big companies, eventually the projections will not play out and governments will end up in massive debt spiral/giving up control over their economy and natural resources. I could not figure out how last section (references to articles and research works about similar cases of corruption/manipulation) was relevant in relation to the main story. More things could have been said in the given length. “Who can see twenty-five years into the future?” she had asked. “Your guess is as good as theirs. Confidence is everything.”

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bill Beck

    Interesting stories with clear political implications. However, this is from a single righteous viewpoint. Not considered are the responsibilities of national security, the decision analyses when rolled up with other national priorities, the impact of other non-geopolitical national/global crises, etc. To this point, Einar Greve, the guy that hired him to Main says "...basically his story is true... What John's book says is, there was a conspiracy to put all these countries on the hook, and that Interesting stories with clear political implications. However, this is from a single righteous viewpoint. Not considered are the responsibilities of national security, the decision analyses when rolled up with other national priorities, the impact of other non-geopolitical national/global crises, etc. To this point, Einar Greve, the guy that hired him to Main says "...basically his story is true... What John's book says is, there was a conspiracy to put all these countries on the hook, and that happened. Whether or not it was some sinister plot or not is up to interpretation, but many of these countries are still over the barrel and have never been able to repay the loans,” according to the book’s Wikipedia page. Still, it is definitely a view into a rather interesting world that does seem grounded in reality...

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