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The Man of Light in Iranian Sufism (Revised)

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A penetrating analysis of the writings of the great Persian mystics on the quest for dawning light in the spiritual journey. Suhrawradi, Semnani, Najm alDin Kubra and other Sufis.


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A penetrating analysis of the writings of the great Persian mystics on the quest for dawning light in the spiritual journey. Suhrawradi, Semnani, Najm alDin Kubra and other Sufis.

30 review for The Man of Light in Iranian Sufism (Revised)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    L'homme de lumiere dans le soufisme Iranien‬‏‬ = The Man of Light in Iranian Sufism, Henry Corbin (1903 - 1978) Henry Corbin's The Man of Light in Iranian Sufism offers a penetrating analysis of the writings of the great Iranian masters - including Suhrawardi, Semnani, and Najm al-Din Kubra - in which he sees an unfolding and continuity of the idea of color and light as symbols of spiritual development. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز نهم ماه سپتامبر سال 2001 میلادی عنوان: انسان نورانی در تصوف ایرانی، اثر: L'homme de lumiere dans le soufisme Iranien‬‏‬ = The Man of Light in Iranian Sufism, Henry Corbin (1903 - 1978) Henry Corbin's The Man of Light in Iranian Sufism offers a penetrating analysis of the writings of the great Iranian masters - including Suhrawardi, Semnani, and Najm al-Din Kubra - in which he sees an unfolding and continuity of the idea of color and light as symbols of spiritual development. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز نهم ماه سپتامبر سال 2001 میلادی عنوان: انسان نورانی در تصوف ایرانی، اثر: هانری(هنری) کربن(کوربن)؛ مترجم: فرامرز جواهری نیا؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، گلبان، 1379، در 240، شابک چاپ سوم: 9789645768025؛ کتابنامه از ص 238 تا 240؛ موضوع: تصوف، ایران بررسی و کنکاش در رساله‌ های: پورسینا، سهروردی، روزبهان شیرازی، و علاءالدوله سمنانی، در باره مفاهیمی همچون: نور، رنگ، بالندگی مینوی، جهان فراحسی، و حکمت اشراق از دیدگاه تصوف ایرانی، است. ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mana H

    کربن آدم خاصی‌ست و یک نظام فلسفی قوی پشت کارهاش هست، که می‌شود یکجاهایی‌ش را البته از سر شور و وجد، حالا، نپذیرفت. ولی اینکه سه ستاره دادم چون ترجمه این کتاب بد است. مترجمی که سکس و یوگا ترجمه کند و در مقدمه‌ی کتاب، کربن را کنار جبران خلیل جبران و کاستاندا بگذارد نباید هم بداند دارد چکار می‌کند. وقتی شیخ را و عارف را "استاد" ترجمه می‌کند و فهمش از عرفان و این مباحث کربن در حد کاستاندا باشد انتظاری هم ندارم. وقتی در مقدمه هم برای این ترجمه‌ی خودش دلیل بتراشد قضیه دردناک می‌شود که نتوانی کتابی را کربن آدم خاصی‌ست و یک نظام فلسفی قوی پشت کارهاش هست، که می‌شود یکجاهایی‌ش را البته از سر شور و وجد، حالا، نپذیرفت. ولی اینکه سه ستاره دادم چون ترجمه این کتاب بد است. مترجمی که سکس و یوگا ترجمه کند و در مقدمه‌ی کتاب، کربن را کنار جبران خلیل جبران و کاستاندا بگذارد نباید هم بداند دارد چکار می‌کند. وقتی شیخ را و عارف را "استاد" ترجمه می‌کند و فهمش از عرفان و این مباحث کربن در حد کاستاندا باشد انتظاری هم ندارم. وقتی در مقدمه هم برای این ترجمه‌ی خودش دلیل بتراشد قضیه دردناک می‌شود که نتوانی کتابی را که دوست داری بدون غرولند بخوانی. هی مداد دست بگیری و برابرنهادها را تصحیح کنی تا بفهمی قضیه چیست. اینقدر این مترجم در کار خودش پیاده است که ترجمه یک آینه از قران در آستانه‌ی کتاب و در پانویس صد صفحه بعد به دو شکل کاملن متفاوت ثبت می‌کند و اصلن نمی‌داند ربط این آیه مشهور نور به متن کتاب و ساختار کتاب چیست که شرق و غرب را در این آیه خاوری و باختری ترجمه کرده است و نه آنجا که سایه تسلط دارد و آنجا که نور تسلط دارد، به ترجمه‌ی بیژن الهی "سایه‌سو" و "آفتاب‌سو".‏ طرح جلد بد، حروف چینی خام و بقیه موارد را بی‌خیال.‏ اگر کسی بخواهد اشراف کربن را در فلسفه، در زبان عربی و فرانسه و در طرح بحث، به فارسی برگرداند باید کسی باشد که هم مبحث را بداند، هم فرانسه را و هم فارسی را. کسی مثل دکتر کوهکن که کتاب "اسلام ایرانی" را برگردانده و نه کس دیگری در این سالهای ایران.‏ این هم رفت در قسمت کتاب‌های غیرقابل استناد...‏

  3. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

    This book was a demanding but worthwhile read. Corbin analyzes the Sufi mystical experience in academic terms, but he also does his best to describe something that transcends words and to nourish the reader's intuitive understanding. He has his own political and religious agenda, but instead of steering him into a blinkered mindset, his beliefs serve as a creative springboard. He does tend to be repetitive, but this is probably necessary in order to maintain the reader's concentration. This is a This book was a demanding but worthwhile read. Corbin analyzes the Sufi mystical experience in academic terms, but he also does his best to describe something that transcends words and to nourish the reader's intuitive understanding. He has his own political and religious agenda, but instead of steering him into a blinkered mindset, his beliefs serve as a creative springboard. He does tend to be repetitive, but this is probably necessary in order to maintain the reader's concentration. This is a quirky and brilliant book, and it falls into the same general milieu as work by Louis Massignon and Gershom Scholem. I highly recommend it!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Henry Corbin is the very best interpretor of the Great Sheikh Ibn Arabi and other heavy Sufi thinkers. In The Man of Light in Iranian Sufism, he explores the impact of Zoroastrianism on burgeoning Persian Sufism. Among topics covered are the roots of Illuminism, encountering one's Perfect Nature or Holy Guardian Angel, and a study of the role of color in visionary experience. Yes, this can be slow going but it rewards the smart, patient reader in unexpected ways.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Adams

    Very interesting but possibly the densest book I have ever read, possibly due to the fact that he uses established terms in an ideosyncratic way; eg anthropology to mean the physiological makeup of an individual. It takes a long time to figure out what he means and then you realise you are not worthy to read his book until you are an established Sufi scholar. Ah...French academics....

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gavin White

    This is one of my first encounters with the Sufi tradition and although it contains much of interest the book as a whole is rather hard work. Firstly the language employed by the author at times reads like a philosophical treatise using an array of terms totally unfamiliar to most readers, which, combined with numerous unwieldy constructions makes the book difficult to read and at times difficult to understand. A second factor that makes it hard work is the penchant of French intellectuals to tr This is one of my first encounters with the Sufi tradition and although it contains much of interest the book as a whole is rather hard work. Firstly the language employed by the author at times reads like a philosophical treatise using an array of terms totally unfamiliar to most readers, which, combined with numerous unwieldy constructions makes the book difficult to read and at times difficult to understand. A second factor that makes it hard work is the penchant of French intellectuals to try and combine style with content to create an informative work of literature, it may well work in the original French but it generally doesn't translate very well - and this is sadly the case here. Nevertheless the book does contain much of interest that is not available elsewhere concerning the esoteric conception of the soul in the Sufi tradition and especially the symbolism of colours. For that, and much more, it is worth an effort to get to grips with. I will, no doubt, return to it and examine some sections in greater detail.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jasbeer Musthafa

    Corbin is one among those authors/philosophers whom I had real difficult to comprehend. This book was one among those titles that made me work hard between lines. This book is a dense analysis of Persian luminaries of mysticism- Suhrawardi, Semnani, Najmuddhin al Kubra et al. This is a recommendable title to anyone who seeks knowledge on esoteric significance. You may find it bit tricky to understand but you will be fascinated!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Clarke

    Dense. Very, very dense. Like a neutron star of scholarly mysticism. As with the previous book by Corbin I’ve read, the parallels between the ‘coloured lights’ of Sufi esotericism and the colour scales of the Western Mysteries are striking.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ed Schulte

    Anyone with direct experience(s) of the subjective light, non-reflected , Divine light will immediately recognize what Corbin was wanting to convey. I doubt he himself had such experiences but no matter. His scholastic enthusiasm for Iranian Sufism and love of the Light subject shines bright here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Nezat

    This is one of the most important books I've read on Sufism and the Pir.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sherwin

    A poetic-philosophical concept: The man of light.

  12. 5 out of 5

    shadab farzanehpour

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rawoyo Abdurrouf

  14. 5 out of 5

    Keith Brough

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alexey Kolykhalov

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Reyes III

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lee Michael

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bydlo Suka

  20. 4 out of 5

    Seti I Shadim

  21. 4 out of 5

    Inbfor

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  24. 4 out of 5

    Zain Raza

  25. 5 out of 5

    Craig Spencer

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marina

  27. 4 out of 5

    Algirdas Brukštus

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kamjat Khan

  29. 4 out of 5

    a

  30. 5 out of 5

    Wolf

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