counter create hit The Wealthy Barber: The Common Sense Guide to Successful Financial Planning - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Wealthy Barber: The Common Sense Guide to Successful Financial Planning

Availability: Ready to download

The Wealthy Barber takes the form of a novel, though it wouldn't win many awards for plot, setting, or characterization. The narrator, Dave, a 28-year-old school teacher and expectant father, his 30-year-old sister, Cathy, who runs a small business, and his buddy, Tom, who works in a refinery, sit around a barber shop in Sarnia, Ontario, and listen as Ray Miller, the well- The Wealthy Barber takes the form of a novel, though it wouldn't win many awards for plot, setting, or characterization. The narrator, Dave, a 28-year-old school teacher and expectant father, his 30-year-old sister, Cathy, who runs a small business, and his buddy, Tom, who works in a refinery, sit around a barber shop in Sarnia, Ontario, and listen as Ray Miller, the well-to-do barber, teaches them how to get rich. The friends are at the age when most people start thinking about their future stability; among the three of them, they face almost every broad situation that can influence a financial plan. Ray, the Socrates of personal finance, isn't a pin-striped Bay Street wizard. He is a simple, down-to-earth barber dispensing homespun wisdom while he lops a little off the top. Ray's barbershop isn't the place to learn strategies for trading options and commodities. Instead, his advice covers the basics of RRSPs, mutual funds, real estate, insurance, and the like. His first and most important rule is "pay yourself first." Take 10 per cent off every pay cheque as it comes in and invest it in safe interest-bearing instruments. Through the magic of compound interest, this 10 per cent will turn into a substantial nest egg over time. This book isn't about how to get rich quick. It's about how to get rich slowly and stay that way.


Compare
Ads Banner

The Wealthy Barber takes the form of a novel, though it wouldn't win many awards for plot, setting, or characterization. The narrator, Dave, a 28-year-old school teacher and expectant father, his 30-year-old sister, Cathy, who runs a small business, and his buddy, Tom, who works in a refinery, sit around a barber shop in Sarnia, Ontario, and listen as Ray Miller, the well- The Wealthy Barber takes the form of a novel, though it wouldn't win many awards for plot, setting, or characterization. The narrator, Dave, a 28-year-old school teacher and expectant father, his 30-year-old sister, Cathy, who runs a small business, and his buddy, Tom, who works in a refinery, sit around a barber shop in Sarnia, Ontario, and listen as Ray Miller, the well-to-do barber, teaches them how to get rich. The friends are at the age when most people start thinking about their future stability; among the three of them, they face almost every broad situation that can influence a financial plan. Ray, the Socrates of personal finance, isn't a pin-striped Bay Street wizard. He is a simple, down-to-earth barber dispensing homespun wisdom while he lops a little off the top. Ray's barbershop isn't the place to learn strategies for trading options and commodities. Instead, his advice covers the basics of RRSPs, mutual funds, real estate, insurance, and the like. His first and most important rule is "pay yourself first." Take 10 per cent off every pay cheque as it comes in and invest it in safe interest-bearing instruments. Through the magic of compound interest, this 10 per cent will turn into a substantial nest egg over time. This book isn't about how to get rich quick. It's about how to get rich slowly and stay that way.

30 review for The Wealthy Barber: The Common Sense Guide to Successful Financial Planning

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Quann

    I like to think I'm a halfway intelligent human being, but an understanding of the financial world has evaded me for longer than I would have liked. I cringe at government paperwork, nod and agree with suggestions at bank meetings, and hand over bank statements to my more money-savvy wife. My brother, an accountant, has tried to break down some key facts for me, but it's always come out as too jargon-filled or has made it seem like excessive effort would be required. The eldritch and arcane worl I like to think I'm a halfway intelligent human being, but an understanding of the financial world has evaded me for longer than I would have liked. I cringe at government paperwork, nod and agree with suggestions at bank meetings, and hand over bank statements to my more money-savvy wife. My brother, an accountant, has tried to break down some key facts for me, but it's always come out as too jargon-filled or has made it seem like excessive effort would be required. The eldritch and arcane world of finance just didn't seem like anything I'd ever master. I might have continued along with my financial ignorance were it not for my pediatric mentor handing me the slim volume and proclaiming that it had changed his life. The guy hasn't let me down with much before, and I figured another swing wouldn't hurt my chances at understanding what goes on with my bank account. Happily, I can report that David Chilton's Canadian classic, The Wealthy Barber, has done what financial lectures, slide shows, and personal experience would never have provided: understanding. Chilton houses financial advice in a surprisingly charming, easy-to-understand, and less than 200 page package. The book distills complex concepts into financial suggestions that are relatively simple to follow. The Wealthy Barber adopts the schtick that three individuals in different financial situations seek advice from a wily, funny, and affluent hair man. I worried that the dialogue and concept would end up being gimmicky and fail to deliver the info I so sorely needed. Not so, as Chilton does a good job of making the dialogue cute and the problems facing our trio relatable. I couldn't have told you my approach to a mortgage, how to properly handle debt, or an approach to creating a retirement fund before reading this book, but I'd gone through the motions of getting it all done. The Wealthy Barber makes me cringe at some decisions, but also makes me happy to do better in the future through more informed decision making. Though the book is in many ways dated (the LOLs: $15 000 for post-secondary education is considered a reasonable estimate), the principles are sound and applicable with a little updating. Definitely a useful and surprisingly readable book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

    This one might have been better in book (versus audiobook) form. The framing device of an ongoing conversation about financial matters between (obnoxious, faux humorous) people in a barber shop was excruciating. Suddenly, Stephen King's admonitions against adverbs in On Writing made a WHOLE LOT OF SENSE. And the narrator's self-description at the beginning makes him sound like a total jerk--I didn't WANT this guy to be financially successful! However, buried in the dialogue is really good, strai This one might have been better in book (versus audiobook) form. The framing device of an ongoing conversation about financial matters between (obnoxious, faux humorous) people in a barber shop was excruciating. Suddenly, Stephen King's admonitions against adverbs in On Writing made a WHOLE LOT OF SENSE. And the narrator's self-description at the beginning makes him sound like a total jerk--I didn't WANT this guy to be financially successful! However, buried in the dialogue is really good, straightforward, useful financial advice, which is why I kept listening. So, aces on the information, but boo to the sharp pieces of glass on the ground through which one needs to crawl to get the useful bits of information.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    This is the first personal finance book I've ever read, and I'm really, really happy to have done it. By presenting a boring topic in a conversational format--including lots of baseball chiding--Chilton makes personal finance accessible to anyone and everyone. He presents a really simple system that anyone can follow, starting today, to get your finances in order. Put 10% into a "I'm going to be rich someday" fund. Put another 10%+ into retirement. Do whatever you want with the rest (essentially) This is the first personal finance book I've ever read, and I'm really, really happy to have done it. By presenting a boring topic in a conversational format--including lots of baseball chiding--Chilton makes personal finance accessible to anyone and everyone. He presents a really simple system that anyone can follow, starting today, to get your finances in order. Put 10% into a "I'm going to be rich someday" fund. Put another 10%+ into retirement. Do whatever you want with the rest (essentially). He even describes dollar cost averaging and the power of compound interest so that the reader can left really understanding the importance of both. What I found really interesting were the sections on insurance, wills, and other elements that I consider to be in the weeds. A few years ago I started taking out some whole life insurance to supplement my company's group policy, but, according to Chilton, I shouldn't have been doing that at all, for reasons that are made really clear in the book! I do, however, fundamentally disagree with his stance on mutual funds. I think if you're a layman, you should be investing in indexed funds, no question. Absolutely no question. This is the one major knock I have on the book. If you're in your 20s, I'd recommend picking both this up and I Will Teach You To Be Rich, which is more current and relevant to 20-somethings in the 2000s.

  4. 4 out of 5

    remi d

    A must read for any friend, it approaches personal finance in a nonchalant, meaningful, practical and funny way which makes the read a breeze. I wanted to read the book for its content on personal finances, but I ended up being caught in the story and enjoying it for its storytelling.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leanne

    This book has a cult-following amongst Canadians, and now that I've read it, I know why. It was first published in 1989, and is written like a "novel", except with more dialogue than any book I've ever read. Here's the set-up: 3 twenty-somethings go to a barber for financial advice. They go eight times (there are each time is a chapter), and have seven lessons with the Wealthy Barber, Ron, who gives them financial advice. 1. Save 10% of your income for long-term growth. Pay yourself first. He talk This book has a cult-following amongst Canadians, and now that I've read it, I know why. It was first published in 1989, and is written like a "novel", except with more dialogue than any book I've ever read. Here's the set-up: 3 twenty-somethings go to a barber for financial advice. They go eight times (there are each time is a chapter), and have seven lessons with the Wealthy Barber, Ron, who gives them financial advice. 1. Save 10% of your income for long-term growth. Pay yourself first. He talks about mutual funds and investing here too. My favourite line from this chapter is when he talks about why it's harder to budget for individuals than it is for businesses: "...for too many people, a want becomes a need." 2. Prepare for your death. Have a will, and, if you have dependents, have life insurance. 3. Save for your retirement. Put as much into your RRSPs as you can-- this is, of course, in addition to your 10%. Start young, so you can take advantage of compounding interest. 4. Think about buying a home. I loved this chapter. I'm in no position to buy a home, but I so often feel pressured to, even though it's not the right decision for me. Chilton writes: "Let me start by saying that whoever the ubiquitous 'they' are who say 'renting is like throwing your money away' aren't accurate. I've read that opinion in several well-known financial planning guides, and I just don't know where the authors are coming from." That's right. He later describes home ownership (and paying a mortgage) as "the ultimate forced-savings program", and talks more about mortgages, but I appreciated that he wasn't like: "Buy, buy, buy!" 5. Saving, spending and credit management. This isn't "saving" like the RRSPs and the 10% fund, this is saving like for a trip. Don't spend too much on your credit cards, and save to buy something before you buy it-- don't just pay it back. A dollar saved is worth more than a dollar earned, because a dollar saved is an after-tax dollar. Be wise with your after-tax money. 6. Investment and income tax. If you have debt, pay off the loan with the highest interest rate first. Credit cards before mortgages. Investing is hard. 7. RESPs. I don't remember too much of this, because I don't have kids. But there was some other advice in the chapter: emergency funds, disability insurance, and staying informed. Tips to live by, and a quick read. Youngandthrifty.ca has a good and funny review. Getrichslowly.org also has a pretty good review. http://www.moneychallenge.ca/blog/201...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Maya Man

    finally got around to this one after much gentle, yet consistent urging of my father, The Wealthy Barber is a thinly veiled lesson in personal finance. aside from a few witty remarks from characters in between the barber's lectures, the book is plainly an essential guide to simply and properly managing your money. a very important read, but honestly not an engaging one. would recommend for educational purposes only, not enjoyment.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David Albert

    There is some very good, general information here that just about anyone can benefit from. I did, however, hate the presentation. It's all presented in a painfully cheesy conversation between a barber, 3 30-somethings in need of knowledge, and a couple of old farts who live in the barber's shop. It made me want to slap someone. Still, I must recommend the book for there was good information inside. It's fairly well rounded, providing value to just about anyone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    John Matsui

    I was among the first to read and review this book for the finance section of an Ontario newspaper when it was first released back in 1989. David Chilton lived in a nearby city and was pushing hard to get reviews. I loved it because it took the dry lessons of personal finance and turned them into a parable about a barber who knew the secret to financial success. I knew the book would be a hit and said so. The rest is history.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Mirr Wysocki

    Such great advice on becoming financially literate AND a quick read

  10. 5 out of 5

    Abdul

    Quote: “Wealth beyond your wildest dreams is possible if you follow the golden rule: Invest 10% of all you make for long-term growth. If you follow that one simple guideline, someday you’ll be a very rich man." Synopsis: The Wealthy Barber is a financial planning book franchise by Canadian author David Chilton. The first book in the series was in the business fable genre, using the story of fictional characters to convey financial advice. My Take: Although the Wealthy Barber was originall Quote: “Wealth beyond your wildest dreams is possible if you follow the golden rule: Invest 10% of all you make for long-term growth. If you follow that one simple guideline, someday you’ll be a very rich man." Synopsis: The Wealthy Barber is a financial planning book franchise by Canadian author David Chilton. The first book in the series was in the business fable genre, using the story of fictional characters to convey financial advice. My Take: Although the Wealthy Barber was originally published in 1989, almost 3 decades ago, I still believe the message of the book and the sound principles the author conveys, still apply to this date. This book has been recommended to me by my Goodreads bestie and book-buddy Celise who read this as part of her 1 book a week challenge. I highly recommend following her on Goodreads and checking out her new BookTube channel on YouTube. My first impression going into the first few chapters was "more of a story than a financial planning book". This is due to the author dedicating the first chapter or two on setting the scene and introducing you to his family and his barber. This works for some readers who prefer being eased into the book and like the "novel" approach to connect with the characters. At first, I thought I did not like that approach but as the book progressed I come to like his unique and entertaining way of presenting dry financial topics as a series of visits to the local barber who mentors the main characters of the bok to their financial freedom. The book shows its age and financial era when discussing funds and the recommendation not to invest your savings in the stock market directly, but instead to go for the safer option of managed Mutual Funds. It is a bit outdated as Mutual Funds are very costly by today's standards and has been proven to underperform the market. You are better off using an index fund than using a mutual fund which depends heavily on the performance and judgement of a human, the money manager. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and it is one of the good financials reads I come across since Rich Dad, Poor Dad and Think and Grow Rich. I will be reading the follow-up and newer edition of the author's book: The Wealthy Barber Returns and making notes this time of the golden nuggets the author shared with us. Quotes: "A dollar saved is two dollars earned." "Over the past fifty years borrowing has gone from a shameful vice to the national pastime." "The only thing worse than a bad investment is a bad investment made with borrowed money." "Curiosity – I find that’s the most commonly seen characteristics of happy people. They’re curious. They love to learn, they love to read, they love to travel, they love to listen to other people’s opinions, they love to learn! If you can teach your kids one thing, I think it will lead to happiness, is to develop curiosity."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Seth Lippert

    This book’s greatest strength also happens to be somewhat of a weakness. Chilton’s financial tips, framed within dialogue, are easily digestible and accessible, but because they are framed in dialogue, what could be summarized easily in a page takes a whole chapter. As a financial novice, I found this book quite helpful and practical, despite the often unnecessarily protracted dialogue. As a lover of quality literature, I found this book quite horrendous. But I won’t be so petty as to go on and o This book’s greatest strength also happens to be somewhat of a weakness. Chilton’s financial tips, framed within dialogue, are easily digestible and accessible, but because they are framed in dialogue, what could be summarized easily in a page takes a whole chapter. As a financial novice, I found this book quite helpful and practical, despite the often unnecessarily protracted dialogue. As a lover of quality literature, I found this book quite horrendous. But I won’t be so petty as to go on and on about adverbs and the jarring insertions of the author’s voice in the present tense and all that—it is, after all, a book about financial planning. The jokes are so extremely bad. But at the same time that is why they are funny.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Dyck

    This book was a great jumping off point to help me begin to understand finance and investment. Written in the format of a novel, it has lots of great advice that makes taking control of your finances a manageable and undaunting task for all. Written in 1989, it is definitely quite dated - especially in chapters dealing with purchasing a house for $75,000 - however most of the advice on long-term investment and compounding interest is still applicable 30 years later. In it's time, a 5/5. Reading This book was a great jumping off point to help me begin to understand finance and investment. Written in the format of a novel, it has lots of great advice that makes taking control of your finances a manageable and undaunting task for all. Written in 1989, it is definitely quite dated - especially in chapters dealing with purchasing a house for $75,000 - however most of the advice on long-term investment and compounding interest is still applicable 30 years later. In it's time, a 5/5. Reading 30 years later and in Canada where the tax systems are different, it was a 4/5 for me. I am excited to follow it up with part two.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dalton Chamberlain

    One of the better financial strategy books I’ve read. It provides clear cut examples for setting yourself up well with a prosperous financial future. Clearly the no-BS way to long term success. Forced Savings, Dollar-Cost Averaging & Compound Interest are truly the secrets to financial freedom. I specifically loved Chilton’s view and perspective on Renting versus Owning. It was a very valuable discussion that I have truly been needing. Excellent. Highly Recommend to anyone looking to buy a home One of the better financial strategy books I’ve read. It provides clear cut examples for setting yourself up well with a prosperous financial future. Clearly the no-BS way to long term success. Forced Savings, Dollar-Cost Averaging & Compound Interest are truly the secrets to financial freedom. I specifically loved Chilton’s view and perspective on Renting versus Owning. It was a very valuable discussion that I have truly been needing. Excellent. Highly Recommend to anyone looking to buy a home or rental property! Read this book! Even just for Chapter 7!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ariel Rezin

    As a book given to me as a gift by my mother, I had relatively low expectations. That was a good thing. This book is essentially a financial self-help book thinly veiled in multiple conversations multiple people have with, you guessed it, a wealthy barber. The financial advice is, in fact, useful. However, the content is relatively dry and could be shared with the reader much more efficiently through a different means than this book. Saying that, I'd recommend this book to those who need some co As a book given to me as a gift by my mother, I had relatively low expectations. That was a good thing. This book is essentially a financial self-help book thinly veiled in multiple conversations multiple people have with, you guessed it, a wealthy barber. The financial advice is, in fact, useful. However, the content is relatively dry and could be shared with the reader much more efficiently through a different means than this book. Saying that, I'd recommend this book to those who need some common-sense financial advice but are scared to expand their reading past novels.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Koehler

    A good introduction to saving money - both short term and long term. My goal was to demystify all the finance lingo. This book didn't necessarily do that but it's a good spring board into the finance world.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lauren McDonald

    If you wanna live the gooooood life and your parents aren't willing to give you a small loan of a million dollars..... READ. THIS. BOOK.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shahab Y-achille

    This book is phenomenal, It’s really your go-to guide on financial planning, organization and beginner level investing. It really prepares you for life. Written in a novel format, the reader is provided with an easy to understand explanation on topics such as: insurance’s,tfsa ,RRSP, mutual funds , stocks , mortgages and so on. I highly recommend this book to anyone new to the world of personal finance

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laila Anne

    This book is a good simplistic guide to financial planning at any age. Some of the topics include saving strategies, leveraged financing and dollar-cost averaging. Being written in the US, some of the verbiage and laws surrounding investment vehicles are different than what we have here, but overall the themes are relevant. 4/5 because the presentation was pretty cheesy. Lots of awful one-liners and drawn out banter about nonsense.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robert Koyich

    I liked The Wealthy Barber. It got me thinking about my financial future and how to achieve a higher level of financial freedom. I also liked how the book was written with dialogue and story that was quite well written. Even though the book was written about two decades ago, much of the wisdom holds true. I think that each person who wants to either retire or achieve longterm financial freedom should know the ideas and principles held within The Wealthy Barber's pages. One critical point is that I liked The Wealthy Barber. It got me thinking about my financial future and how to achieve a higher level of financial freedom. I also liked how the book was written with dialogue and story that was quite well written. Even though the book was written about two decades ago, much of the wisdom holds true. I think that each person who wants to either retire or achieve longterm financial freedom should know the ideas and principles held within The Wealthy Barber's pages. One critical point is that since the book was written a long while ago, I'm not certain of some of the figures and numbers would hold true today. Still, the principles of the book are valuable to know and understand.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    The wealthy Barber has become a classic of Canadian financial literature for the average Joe, and for good reason. The Wealthy Barber is not your everyday boring financial planning book which instructs you on how to budget and predict the stock market. The wealthy barber does not even cover those topics as viable paths to financial prosperity as everyone who has tried a personal budget knows how hard it is to follow. Same with the stock market, it is ridiculous to believe that millions will easi The wealthy Barber has become a classic of Canadian financial literature for the average Joe, and for good reason. The Wealthy Barber is not your everyday boring financial planning book which instructs you on how to budget and predict the stock market. The wealthy barber does not even cover those topics as viable paths to financial prosperity as everyone who has tried a personal budget knows how hard it is to follow. Same with the stock market, it is ridiculous to believe that millions will easily be made, just like in the movies. This book keeps it sweet and simple with common sense advice on becoming wealthy with what you have, whether it be millions, thousands, or just about nothing at all. The main point of the Wealthy Barber is to pay yourself first by saving 10% of all income for long term growth. If this sounds simple, it’s because it really is. By paying yourself first, before you even have the chance to redirect the money towards a fishing trip up north, you eliminate the hassle of trying to find money to save after you have spent it all. Investing is not as complicated as it may seem. It does not take much effort to educate yourself on the different types and styles of mutual funds. With a good head and the wealthy barber at your side, you will be able to determine which mutual fund suits you best, and most important of all, which one will make you the most money. Roy, our book’s wealthy barber, stresses that patience is the key to becoming wealthy. You don’t get rich overnight. You get rich slowly, over time through careful planning and diligence. If your mutual fund or other investment begins to tank, don’t worry, markets always go up in the long run. Sit tight, don’t panic and take advantage of the low prices to purchase some shares which will undoubtedly be worth more in the future. I would recommend this book to every single Canadian who cares about their money. Money is a topic seldom covered in school, with family, and with friends, so where do we learn about it. Truth is most people don’t learn. The Wealthy Barber makes it unbelievably easy to learn personal finance. My whole family has read the book and loved it. All of the people to whom I have talked to abut the book said they loved it as well. One person even told me that they read the book when it was first published and it was the best thing they ever did. They are now much better off than they would have ever dreamed of being with the financial knowledge they had at the time. Whether or not you decide to read the book, you can take a way this very simple lesson which you will be very grateful for down the road. Invest 10% of your income for long term growth. It is never too late or too early to start “The best time to plant an oak tree was 20 years ago, the second best time is today” -Roy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Greg Talbot

    Thank you to Brian Preston and Bo Hanson ("The Money Guys" podcast) and their "on point" podcast about the key financial books you have to read. This is a primer, an easy read, a well-meaning story about getting financial advice that isn't going to overwhelm you. The human element seems to be what separates a great finance book from a typical pressing of finance information. The story revolves around a young naive man Tom who goes to his local barber known for the best money tips and haircut snip Thank you to Brian Preston and Bo Hanson ("The Money Guys" podcast) and their "on point" podcast about the key financial books you have to read. This is a primer, an easy read, a well-meaning story about getting financial advice that isn't going to overwhelm you. The human element seems to be what separates a great finance book from a typical pressing of finance information. The story revolves around a young naive man Tom who goes to his local barber known for the best money tips and haircut snips. From a story perspective, it's really ingenious, we know enough about Tom for his questions about insurance, 401ks, and college savings account questions to come in an organic and organized manner. The book walks the lie of finance knowledge that is prudent and safe with ideas about saving 10% long term, dollar cost averaging and distinguishing needs and wants. It's the type of personal finance book 95% of us need to read multiple times in our lives, and just stay that solid course. Finance gets trickier if you let it. There are ETFs, derivatives, commodities, and all kinds of investment vehicles to get you where you want to go..but these investments are no silver bullet. Like anything worth attaining; prudence, discipline, and staying the course are the invaluable attributes to bet on. There may be short term gains to be made in market timing, or aggressive technical analysis, but what kind of plan is that anyway. It's true that 1996 looked a lot different than it does today. Our barber's long term concerns about real estate look quaint when you look at the catastrophic events of the 2007 crash. College tuition rates are unfathomably high. And the difficult job market that exists today is hardly even acknowledged as a possibly in the book's contents. All of this is pretty funny or sad depending how the coin lands, but ultimately it doesn't detach from the book's approachable and simple truths. "The Wealthy Barber" was written in kinder economic times, and fortunately it's wisdom is all the more salient, now that many of us have less room for failure.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Frode

    This is my second time through the book. I reread it since I am recommending it to a couple of younger fellows; thus, I am needing to be up to speed on it for our future discussions. It is readable, enjoyable, and has a number of profitable ideas. The case he makes for mutual funds is ok for many, but some will prefer to own particular stocks. While he advocates not using credit cards, their convenience combined with self discipline makes them a useful tool. Of course, they are like fire, a usef This is my second time through the book. I reread it since I am recommending it to a couple of younger fellows; thus, I am needing to be up to speed on it for our future discussions. It is readable, enjoyable, and has a number of profitable ideas. The case he makes for mutual funds is ok for many, but some will prefer to own particular stocks. While he advocates not using credit cards, their convenience combined with self discipline makes them a useful tool. Of course, they are like fire, a useful tool but a fearful master. Some places are actually funny when it comes to the banter between the three seeking information, the barber, and the three fellows who hang out in the shop. I recommend it to all, but for folks in their 20's and 30's, it is prime reading material.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Debs

    I was kind of "meh" when this book won our book club vote, but I'm actually really glad I read it. Even though my first thoughts were around how chauvinistic and sexist some peoples were and how I wanted to punch them in the face, I did find that it moved very well and was entertaining in a stereotypical dubbed down, must be accessible all-American-boy way. And the writing is...like...SO terrible. But that's not really the point here. The advice in this book is sound. I'm giving it points because I was kind of "meh" when this book won our book club vote, but I'm actually really glad I read it. Even though my first thoughts were around how chauvinistic and sexist some peoples were and how I wanted to punch them in the face, I did find that it moved very well and was entertaining in a stereotypical dubbed down, must be accessible all-American-boy way. And the writing is...like...SO terrible. But that's not really the point here. The advice in this book is sound. I'm giving it points because it got me thinking and moving somewhat on my own finances and that's not something I usually pay much mind to. Even though it's outdated. Like...seriously...15% return rate? That doesn't exist anymore. But yeah. I don't care about the Tigers.

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

    The 'My Dinner with Andre' of Canada-specific financial planning

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anna K. Lindegren

    Originally published http://lifeasaninvestment.com/2014/04... It is nicely written, and with a sense of humor. The Canadian author gives it away with the title—it does not matter what you do and how much money you earn, you have the same chances of being wealthy as anybody else. Most importantly, follow your financial plan no matter what. David Chilton is not only a writer; he is also a successful investor. He can be seen making investment decisions at the Dragons’ Den Canada show (from 2012-prese Originally published http://lifeasaninvestment.com/2014/04... It is nicely written, and with a sense of humor. The Canadian author gives it away with the title—it does not matter what you do and how much money you earn, you have the same chances of being wealthy as anybody else. Most importantly, follow your financial plan no matter what. David Chilton is not only a writer; he is also a successful investor. He can be seen making investment decisions at the Dragons’ Den Canada show (from 2012-present). On a cozy weekend evening, make a cup of warm chocolate, sit on your favorite armchair and enjoy reading and learning…

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    Bad jokes and good financial advice go a long way to making me enjoy a book and this had both. By now the book is probably a little dated for some of the advice but really there are important principles that are timeless, the first being that I should have started investing ten years ago. Ah well. Really this book is a nice short read and serves well as an entertaining primer to financial planning. Probably much of the advice is common knowledge and the toughest thing is making the first step to Bad jokes and good financial advice go a long way to making me enjoy a book and this had both. By now the book is probably a little dated for some of the advice but really there are important principles that are timeless, the first being that I should have started investing ten years ago. Ah well. Really this book is a nice short read and serves well as an entertaining primer to financial planning. Probably much of the advice is common knowledge and the toughest thing is making the first step to put it into practice.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Murray deBoer

    Good,clean, simple financial planning to make anyone well off. Unfortunately when I read this book about 20 years ago I did not follow all of the steps and as a result am not in the secure financial position I could be. But, it's never to late to start doing things better. The book has 12 very simple basis ideas, the most important being, pay yourself 10% of every paycheck first and invest in long term savings, have the proper and right amount of life insurance, have an up to date will, maximize Good,clean, simple financial planning to make anyone well off. Unfortunately when I read this book about 20 years ago I did not follow all of the steps and as a result am not in the secure financial position I could be. But, it's never to late to start doing things better. The book has 12 very simple basis ideas, the most important being, pay yourself 10% of every paycheck first and invest in long term savings, have the proper and right amount of life insurance, have an up to date will, maximize your RRSP, and paying off debts is teh best investment!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    this original is probably outdated now but it still has quite a lot to offer. I read this at 21 (my mother forced me to read it). It is one of, if not the very first book that opened my eyes to the world of investments, esp. real estate. It was instrumental in helping me purchase my first home at 23, then my first investment property at 25. There are a lot of books in finance, but this one was my first real teacher. I talked about it a lot with my clients and when I spoke at seminars. A great boo this original is probably outdated now but it still has quite a lot to offer. I read this at 21 (my mother forced me to read it). It is one of, if not the very first book that opened my eyes to the world of investments, esp. real estate. It was instrumental in helping me purchase my first home at 23, then my first investment property at 25. There are a lot of books in finance, but this one was my first real teacher. I talked about it a lot with my clients and when I spoke at seminars. A great book to have your young adult kids read, if you can get them to.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Washburn

    Most of it is just common sense as the title would have you believe. A couple tips I didn't already know about. It seemed like it would be a great book for someone who hasn't grown up financially educated by their parents. For me almost all of it was stuff I was either doing or at least new I should do. Overall it is a very easy read that gives a full frame work for personal finance. A little dated but still useful and largely valid.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Art

    This personal finance book is presented in a non-threatening and easy to understand manner. The main character's father guides him to a local barber who has done well financially by following sound financial principles. The barber dispenses his knowledge to some pupils during weekly meetings in his barbershop. I highly recommend this book, especially to those new to the subject of personal finance.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.