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The Complete Works of Lewis Carroll! The Complete 'Alice Stories', Novels, Short-Stories, Poems and Non-Fiction. The Ultimate Collection of Lewis Carroll - In One Beautifully Formatted Volume! The 'Alice in Wonderland" Stories have earned Lewis a place in the hearts of generations of adults and children alike. Filled with the madcap creations of Carroll's incomparabl The Complete Works of Lewis Carroll! The Complete 'Alice Stories', Novels, Short-Stories, Poems and Non-Fiction. The Ultimate Collection of Lewis Carroll - In One Beautifully Formatted Volume! The 'Alice in Wonderland" Stories have earned Lewis a place in the hearts of generations of adults and children alike. Filled with the madcap creations of Carroll's incomparable imagination, the 'Alice' stories are populated with characters that have entered the public consciousness - like the 'Mad Hatter', or 'The Queen of Hearts'.As well as these more famous creations Lewis Carroll wrote a number of splendid novels and short stories, as well as poetry collections, and his lesser-known mathematical works, which display his interest in ciphers, codes and logic.This huge volume has been carefully researched, edited, compiled and formatted, for excellent navigation and reading pleasure.The works contained in this volume are: NOVELS: - Alice's Adventures under Ground- Alice's Adventures in Wonderland- Through the Looking-Glass- Sylvie and Bruno- Sylvie and Bruno Concluded SHORT-STORIES: - A Tangled Tale- Bruno's Revenge and Other Stories- What the Tortoise Said to Achilles POEMS: - Early Verse- Prologues to Plays- College Rhymes and Notes by an Oxford Chiel- Phantasmagoria and Other Poems- The Hunting of the Snark- Three Sunsets and Other Poems- Puzzles From Wonderland- Acrostics, Inscriptions and Other Verses MATHEMATICAL WORKS - Symbolic Works- The Game of Logic- The Alphabet Cipher- Feeding the Mind


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The Complete Works of Lewis Carroll! The Complete 'Alice Stories', Novels, Short-Stories, Poems and Non-Fiction. The Ultimate Collection of Lewis Carroll - In One Beautifully Formatted Volume! The 'Alice in Wonderland" Stories have earned Lewis a place in the hearts of generations of adults and children alike. Filled with the madcap creations of Carroll's incomparabl The Complete Works of Lewis Carroll! The Complete 'Alice Stories', Novels, Short-Stories, Poems and Non-Fiction. The Ultimate Collection of Lewis Carroll - In One Beautifully Formatted Volume! The 'Alice in Wonderland" Stories have earned Lewis a place in the hearts of generations of adults and children alike. Filled with the madcap creations of Carroll's incomparable imagination, the 'Alice' stories are populated with characters that have entered the public consciousness - like the 'Mad Hatter', or 'The Queen of Hearts'.As well as these more famous creations Lewis Carroll wrote a number of splendid novels and short stories, as well as poetry collections, and his lesser-known mathematical works, which display his interest in ciphers, codes and logic.This huge volume has been carefully researched, edited, compiled and formatted, for excellent navigation and reading pleasure.The works contained in this volume are: NOVELS: - Alice's Adventures under Ground- Alice's Adventures in Wonderland- Through the Looking-Glass- Sylvie and Bruno- Sylvie and Bruno Concluded SHORT-STORIES: - A Tangled Tale- Bruno's Revenge and Other Stories- What the Tortoise Said to Achilles POEMS: - Early Verse- Prologues to Plays- College Rhymes and Notes by an Oxford Chiel- Phantasmagoria and Other Poems- The Hunting of the Snark- Three Sunsets and Other Poems- Puzzles From Wonderland- Acrostics, Inscriptions and Other Verses MATHEMATICAL WORKS - Symbolic Works- The Game of Logic- The Alphabet Cipher- Feeding the Mind

30 review for The Complete Lewis Carroll: The Complete 'Alice' Collection, Plus Novels, Short Stories, Poems and Non-Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Manuel Antão

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Theories Galore: "Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland" by Lewis Carroll (Original Review, 1994-08-10) I’ve always interpreted “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” as a (modern) Fairytale. In a way most of modern commercial movies are more like classical fairytales: very elemental stories set in a simplistic moral universe, with stereotypical characters. The movies may seem to be more complex but that is mostly 'effect'. Movies are very good at If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Theories Galore: "Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland" by Lewis Carroll (Original Review, 1994-08-10) I’ve always interpreted “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” as a (modern) Fairytale. In a way most of modern commercial movies are more like classical fairytales: very elemental stories set in a simplistic moral universe, with stereotypical characters. The movies may seem to be more complex but that is mostly 'effect'. Movies are very good at the dazzle part of the story telling business. Complexity of story: very much less so.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joshlynn

    This volume will stay with me for my entire life. It was the first "grown-up" book I ever received -- as a gift from a stranger whose name escapes me. Whoever it was, they changed my life. Stepping into Carroll's world opened my mind to the possibilities of the human imagination, the concept of math as art, and interested me in the man behind the genius.

  3. 4 out of 5

    K.D.

    This has turned into one of my, "at home" books; I dare you to take it into public. It's like bound spontaneous laughter. "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the Unicorn, "if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. Is that a bargain?"

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sofia

    I have very mixed reviews of this one book. Complete collections of Lewis Carroll, and I now understand why Alice in Wonderland, followed by Through the Looking Glass, are his best known works. I suppose I shouldn't say I "completed" this book, because after Sylvie and Bruno I just couldn't take it. Baby talk. I cannot STAND baby talk in real life, and reading it (even coming from a small child), is more than I can take. For example, here's the sort of excerpt that makes me fly on in an angry ra I have very mixed reviews of this one book. Complete collections of Lewis Carroll, and I now understand why Alice in Wonderland, followed by Through the Looking Glass, are his best known works. I suppose I shouldn't say I "completed" this book, because after Sylvie and Bruno I just couldn't take it. Baby talk. I cannot STAND baby talk in real life, and reading it (even coming from a small child), is more than I can take. For example, here's the sort of excerpt that makes me fly on in an angry rant: "Doos oo think Crocodiles goes walks wizout blankets?" I don't care how young the character you're writing about is suppose to be - this is obnoxious and makes me intensely dislike this child... Which may be irrational and unfair, but this was just painful. I enjoyed the nonsense of Alice in Wonderland. It's very well done if you accept that you're reading a dream. It's well done that way - like when you're having a dream and a pink elephant walks in, you just accept it and start up a conversation. And when he turns into Lucille Ball you just accept it and continue on. That, I enjoyed. The nonsense of Sylvie and Bruno blended with those existential conversations in the adult world was just not engaging for me... I couldn't bring myself to carry on with "Sylvie and Bruno Concluded." Maybe if I become masochistic one day I'll attempt it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sharyl

    What is the use of a book without pictures or conversations? I agree--especially conversations. And the conversations in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass are some of the most famously fabulous confabulations. (Don't mind me, I just like how that word sounds). These pictures, by illustrator John Tenniel, were very important to Lewis Carroll and his story. It's been many years since I've read these stories, and I am surprised to find them both profound and hilarious. ( What is the use of a book without pictures or conversations? I agree--especially conversations. And the conversations in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass are some of the most famously fabulous confabulations. (Don't mind me, I just like how that word sounds). These pictures, by illustrator John Tenniel, were very important to Lewis Carroll and his story. It's been many years since I've read these stories, and I am surprised to find them both profound and hilarious. (But then, I am not the same person I was yesterday.) It now seems obvious that Alice's shifting size, discomfort, and confusion simply describe being--a child. By the way, Alice is seven and a half years old, and she is always the voice of intelligence and innocence in the rather insane, more adult world around her. The sequel story, Through the Looking Glass, has a darker, more serious tone, in my opinion. I know that the first time I read this, the fact that there is a chess game on the entire time was lost on me. Alice begins as a pawn, and that train ride she takes at the beginning is her first move--a big one, since pawns are allowed to move two spaces in their first turn. And the way the queens move so fast (making Alice run and get out of breath) corresponds to the way a queen is allowed to move. Near the end, the white knight who rescues her, and is so clumsily falling off his horse, left and right, is demonstrating his L-shaped moves, as well. After her encounter with the knight, Alice has only to cross over one more brook before reaching the eighth rank promotion to queen. She wakes up after capturing the red queen. Note: evidently, back in Lewis Carroll's day, most chess sets were red and white, instead of black and white. I don't know much about chess, so this would be what I notice. :) Another thing lost on me was the famous conversation with the white queen, when she says, The rule is, jam to-morrow and jam yesterday - but never jam to-day.' I took for granted that that was pure silly nonsense, but it was actually meant as a pun. It is a rule of Latin grammar (which I don't remember learning myself in Latin class) that "iam" means "now," but only in past and future. In the present, the word would be "nunc." (i and j are interchangeable in Latin.) Evidently, this quote became so famous that it became an expression for asking for too much, as in "I suppose you want jam on that." What was not lost on me the first time was the poems. The Jabberwocky and The Walrus and the Carpenter, especially. And Alice's conversation with Humpty Dumpty, and how he translates some of the words in the first poem is fun. (He's quite the egg head.) There is so much to love, here--and I know it's all been said before. I am very glad that I picked it up again!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    1) Alice's Adventures in Wonderland 2) Through the Looking Glass 3) Sylvie and Bruno 4) Sylvie and Bruno Concluded 5) A Tangled Tale 6) The Hunting of the Snark 7) Phantasmagoria and Other Poems 8) Three Sunsets and Other Poems

  7. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Junia

    Lewis Carroll was a genius.

  8. 4 out of 5

    A

    I consider the "Alice" books and Carroll's nonsense poems some of the greatest works in the English language. Viewing the full scope of his work in this hefty tome, it's difficult to say everything else reaches the same level, which is why I dock a star. The "Sylvie & Bruno" novels are interesting, more adult versions of his surreal fantasy with overt nods to fairy lore, but they oddly suffer from moralism and sentimentality. His early poetry is strikingly very Victorian and not always bad, just I consider the "Alice" books and Carroll's nonsense poems some of the greatest works in the English language. Viewing the full scope of his work in this hefty tome, it's difficult to say everything else reaches the same level, which is why I dock a star. The "Sylvie & Bruno" novels are interesting, more adult versions of his surreal fantasy with overt nods to fairy lore, but they oddly suffer from moralism and sentimentality. His early poetry is strikingly very Victorian and not always bad, just unformed and derivative. If you like Lewis Carroll and want to explore his work in more depth, any of the complete collections are well advised. It certainly gives one a more full picture of Carroll's core themes and style, his absolute talent with language and logic. If you like the "Alice" books, read Gardner's annotations first.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alexis Fedor

    For me, who hasn't read these stories all the way through, I find my imagination stimulated with each short sitting.

  10. 4 out of 5

    M.L. Crane

    This one was difficult for me to rate. While Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass have both always been 5 stars for me, I found the rest of his work boring. I did like a couple of his poems, but overall I was a bit disappointed. For years I have always said that Lewis Carroll was one of my favorite authors and now I’m so sad to discover that that isn’t the truth. However, the Alice books will forever be my favorite books.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mira Tabsh

    I bought this book just for Alice in Wonderland. It's a must read, and Alice is the backbone of so many songs and other stories. The lines are hilarious...Lewis Carroll is a genious.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Serena W. Sorrell

    For all my love of the Alice duology I simply do not get on well with much of the rest of Carroll's writing. The Hunting of the Snark was good, but most of his poetry and other stories were just so dragging I couldn't stay focused at all. Alas, it seems Alice's Adventures really are my favorite of his.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Phoebe

    I'm sorry I just don't get it! None of it makes any sense! I can only relate it to those absolutely horrible dreams you get when you cant wake yourself up, not a pleasant feeling! I didn't understand the Disney animation, live action or the book. I don't get the hype and I don't think it deserves it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dayna Smith

    This collection of the fantasy novels and poems of Lewis Carroll is a must read for all fans of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and other works by this author. It contains four novels, some short essays, and Carroll's collected poems. This book is a must read classic for all lovers of Carroll's charming works.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mike Gunderloy

    I read not this, but a very similar Kindle collection. It was still a whole mess of Carroll, and although I'd read old favorites like the Alice books and the Snark multiple times, there were still things here that were new to me. Most of it I enjoyed immensely, though perhaps there were a _few_ too many acrostics of the names of young ladies.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND I read some of the background and history to this book before reading. This was good as it answered some of the questions I would have had. I also read some of the reviews here on Goodreads after reading the book. It could be that some people miss out on the whole idea of the story. It was a tale told to a few girls while out in a boat trip sailing up a river told by Lewis Carroll to keep them amused. Lewis Carroll used characters they knew in the story such as th ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND I read some of the background and history to this book before reading. This was good as it answered some of the questions I would have had. I also read some of the reviews here on Goodreads after reading the book. It could be that some people miss out on the whole idea of the story. It was a tale told to a few girls while out in a boat trip sailing up a river told by Lewis Carroll to keep them amused. Lewis Carroll used characters they knew in the story such as the White Rabbit, who was based on Henry George Liddell, The Dean of Christ Church, Alice Liddell’s father. Alice’s father was always running around late for everything. It’s a story about a girl having a dream. It’s nonsense and fun, with great word play. “Who in the world am I?” is Alice’s refrain. It’s a question she answers when she meets the caterpillar on his mushroom. “I can’t explain myself,” she says, “because I’m not myself, you see.” I loved it and so did Alice Liddell who begged Lewis Carroll to write it down. THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS Wow - Maybe I’m just travelling on one of the same planes (and I’m not talking about a trip abroad) as Lewis Carroll. This story put a smile on my face and took me away. I felt when reading this I was dreaming and believing. We do a Dr Who but instead of a Tardis we have the book to go somewhere else but not here. I have a poor memory which in this case is great, so that as long as I can remember I can read it again and again and go. I don’t know what most people think, I have yet to read other reviews on ‘Goodreads’ but in this case I care not one bit. Grabbed it and loved it. Lewis Carroll once said ‘If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there.’ But in this case you go through the looking glass with Alice. It’s a world where I write with my left hand, my right ear sticks out and I wear a ring on my right ring finger. It’s the strange side but worth the visit. SYLVIE AND BRUNO I've always felt I have never been able to describe the 2 worlds in which I live, the outland and the dream in an epileptic fit. This book links theses 2 worlds and is me. When I next go to the epileptic Centre to see my Doctor who will ask me again to describe the fit, I shall tell him to read this story to get a true feel of where my mind goes. My outland is not the same nor my dream, the ivory door but its the way the 2 link that Lewis Carroll has described with great feeling and accuracy. So if you want to know how it feels to have a 'Frontal Temporal Lobe Fit' read 'Sylvie and Bruno. Lewis Carroll had Temporal Lobe Epilepsy which you get a feel of in the Alice stories but 'Sylvie and Bruno' proved it. I then checked it out. SYLVIE AND BRUNO CONCLUDED A strange, odd book that is hard to follow but well worth it. It is very surreal and feels like you have had one to many as the words carry you along with a smile on your face. You need to be in the right frame of mind to enjoy this book as it is made of bits. So choose your moment. A TANGLED TALE 10 short tales that combine humour with mathematics. ‘A Tangled Tale’ of Knots. As an example Knot V11’s Mathematics problem is an Aunt and Niece who on their train travels have their lunch bills mixed up which need sorting. Given certain pieces of information this is possible. It’s a bit like an 11+ exam question done to poetry. The fact I found this so entertaining and completely different and enjoyed the maths means I give it ….4. Yes not 5. Not sure if it’s a book really. An entertaining quiz certainly. THE HUNTING OF THE SNARK It’s a great nonsense poem. A crew travel to hunt the snark which may actually be a very dangerous Boojum. Carroll always said he had no idea what the poem was about but of course many people have taken a guess. Carroll did once reply to a letter agreeing it was all about searching for happiness. What did I think? I think Carroll new what it was about. It followed a pattern but he just never told anybody. Many keep asking questions about Lewis Carroll and if he was a paedophile, what sort of migraines or epilepsy etc. Fact, he was a great writer and unique. Enjoy the nonsense. PHANTASMOGORIA AND OTHER POEMS Someone else wrote in their review that the title poem was ‘quite humorous’. I would change that to ‘magic’. 5 out of 5. The sad thing about this book, not ‘Phantasmagoria and Other Poems’ but the ‘the complete Works’ is that I am reaching the end. I do not want to finish it. What about the other poems in this part of the book? Yes a drop in quality only 4.5 out of 5, still great word play. I finished this part of his complete works on a lower cloud. THREE SUNSETS AND OTHER POEMS Pretty. I may be overweight and 55 yrs. old but I still cried reading this poetry. I cried because it was (am I allowed to use this word?) lovely. I cried because others in their reviews wrote they didn’t get it and that’s sad as they missed out. One person who did a review on the complete works wrote it doesn’t make sense and Lewis Carroll’s poetry drags. I cried again because I have finished this book and enjoyed it cover to cover. I suppose I could read it again but with so many books out there waiting for me I doubt it but this is only my second book to get 5 stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bob G

    I thought his best works were his most famous (Alice, Looking Glass). I also liked a lot: Sylvie & Bruno (except where he pontificated), The Hunting of The Snark, and his rant about the New Belfry. Some other works were amusing as well. I thought his best works were his most famous (Alice, Looking Glass). I also liked a lot: Sylvie & Bruno (except where he pontificated), The Hunting of The Snark, and his rant about the New Belfry. Some other works were amusing as well.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stevie Engbrock

    It was a good book and Alice is a polite and intelligent female role model.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Carsley

    His poetry is much stronger than his trippy narratives, but stylistically there isn't much difference. Jabberwocky is an incredible poem and is a masterpiece in itself.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Demeter Theodora

    Alice in Wonderland is a masterpiece but the other works are not as good. However his style is memorable.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte DaVinci

    better as a kid

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Only read Alice in Wonderland from this book

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mariah

    This beautiful leather bound, gilded edition contains both of Alice's adventures. I read this when preparing to go study abroad with my most beloved English tutor. This will always mean the world to me. RIP Lawrence.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marci Z

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. through the looking glass - Alice travels to the room in the mirror where everything is the same but opposite. ... Alice goes outside and sees a be OPautiful garden that she wants to get to. no matter which path she takes, she keeps ending up back at the house. finally she sees the red queen out there and tries going in the opposite direction of the garden and actually reaches her. they come upon a hill over looking an enormous chest board where they are tall enough to be the pieces. they run to through the looking glass - Alice travels to the room in the mirror where everything is the same but opposite. ... Alice goes outside and sees a be OPautiful garden that she wants to get to. no matter which path she takes, she keeps ending up back at the house. finally she sees the red queen out there and tries going in the opposite direction of the garden and actually reaches her. they come upon a hill over looking an enormous chest board where they are tall enough to be the pieces. they run to it but remain where they are. Alice gets thirsty from running and the queen gives her a biscuit. the next square was a wood with no names. Alice forgot her name and walked with a fawn that didn't know it couldn't be with a human. Tweedle Dee and Dum are discovered next. they had to have a battle. they got dressed in bunches of rags to protect themselves but a large crow came and scared them away from it. Alice met the white queen next. The white queen was quite disheveled but told her that time goes backwards there and a trial was to begin before the crime. The queen tried to get Alice to believe impossible things and said she sometimes believes 6 impossible things before breakfast. the next square had her in a shop with a sheep as the proprietor. The sheep took her on a row boat ride all the while knitting with so many needles she looked like a porcupine. Finally, Alice chose to buy an egg and when she went to retrieve it, she realized the egg was humpty dumpty. She complimented his cravat and he told her that it was an unbirthday present and all about unbirthdays. She makes her way past the lion and the unicorn to finally meet the queens for tea. Alice blames the red queen for causing an uproar and begins shaking her until she turns into a kitten and wakes up at home. Sylvie and bruno - they are children of a kind man the warden. However, the sub warden the wardens brother and the chancellor plot to overthrow the warden. They trick him into signing bills that they say abolish taxes but actually increase them. Finally they trick him into signing a bill making the brother a vice warden and includes all sorts of provisions to ensure the brother never relinquishes power back to the warden. The warden leaves on business and almost immediately a beggar shows up hungry. The vice warden and chancellor are cruel to him and turn him away, but bruno feels sorry for him and chases him down to give him a piece of cake. The man eats the cake and leads them down a staircase. Upon reaching the bottom, the children realize the beggar was their father. He has been made king of elfland and they traveled a thousand miles by the royal road. 2 messengers were sent and the royal bloodied one had arrived but the baron took over a month. Their father gave silvie a locket. She chose the one which said "silvie will love all." Upon returning home, the baron finally arrived and the vice warden and his wife were pretending uggug was bruno to become royalty themselves. When they returned, everything had gotten much worse in their treatment, so they set off to find fairyland. The narrator is coming into and out of their story between narcoleptic events in the real world.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lavoie Lianne (The Towering Pile)

    This review will be sort of split up by section, since there's a wide variety of material in this book. The book starts out with Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Of course, this story is simply delightful. I'd read it before, and it's what made me figure I'd enjoy Carroll's complete works. It has just the right amount of nonsense, and the characters are simply delightful. And this is one of those books that was adapted to film so well that having seen the movie actually increases my enjoyment of This review will be sort of split up by section, since there's a wide variety of material in this book. The book starts out with Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Of course, this story is simply delightful. I'd read it before, and it's what made me figure I'd enjoy Carroll's complete works. It has just the right amount of nonsense, and the characters are simply delightful. And this is one of those books that was adapted to film so well that having seen the movie actually increases my enjoyment of the book. I have perfect images in my mind of the Mad Hatter, the Cheshire Cat, and the Red Queen. The next story is Through the Looking Glass. It's sort of like a continuation of Wonderland. Alice steps through a mirror and finds another strange world. I don't enjoy this one as much as Wonderland. The characters she encounters are much less likable. Many of them are sort of mean and annoying. And the nonsense in this story (normally an element I enjoy) gets to the point where I don't even know what's going on anymore. Sylvie and Bruno took me a while to get into. After a bit I figured out that the narrator was alternating between dreaming and reality, but there was no transition, so in the beginning I was just confused. Once I got the hang of the switching back and forth, I started to get into the story. It's much slower moving than the Alice stories. However, Sylvie and Bruno are such adorable characters that I still found it worth reading. Then comes Sylvie and Bruno Concluded. By this time, it's difficult to get through. Sylvie and Bruno, and some of the other characters, are quite delightful, but the story simply doesn't go anywhere! People visit each other, and go for walks, and various people tell nonsensical stories and sing songs. So while some parts are enjoyable, as a whole, it's not so much a story as just a lot of randomness, and it took me a very long time to read. Stories should have plots, I feel! The next section is Verse, and that part was a really mixed bag for me. Hunting of the Snark was lovely, as was a lot of the early stuff. But then there were some that were seemingly written in Scots, and some that were very difficult riddles, and some that were just so nonsensical that I didn't get anything out of them. The rest of the book consists of short stories and other really random stuff. I confess, I didn't read much of these parts. By this point I was exhausted by the book, and nothing I started reading really grabbed me. Maybe at some point I'll read some of these parts, but for now I need a break from Lewis Carroll. So, while Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is delightful, the whole book gets 2 stars from me. This review is copied from my blog, The Towering Pile. It was originally published here.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    There's probably a reason you're not really familiar with the other works of Lewis Carroll beyond Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. Certainly those two were the easiest reads in this book. My biggest problem with the two of them, is that Alice is a truly obnoxious child. Her actions and reactions to her adventures vary between totally bland to utterly rude. This was my first time reading the Alice stories, and I did enjoy finding the little bits I know from movies and plays, and There's probably a reason you're not really familiar with the other works of Lewis Carroll beyond Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. Certainly those two were the easiest reads in this book. My biggest problem with the two of them, is that Alice is a truly obnoxious child. Her actions and reactions to her adventures vary between totally bland to utterly rude. This was my first time reading the Alice stories, and I did enjoy finding the little bits I know from movies and plays, and seeing how they differed in the source material. I also enjoyed Sylvie and Bruno, along with Sylvie and Bruno Concluded (the next two novels in this collection), although they were a bit of a slog to get through. This was both due to the length, and also because the story was hard to follow at first. But eventually I found I was interested in both the fairy children and the narrator. Admittedly the dialogue as written for Bruno was annoying to read, but because the narrator shares the confusion at understanding his child-speak, I was usually okay with it. The narrators real-life story was of more interest to me than his visions of the eerie-life with Sylvie and Bruno, but after the first two or three chapters I found it easier to follow the transition, and started getting more invested in both stories. The poems that completed this collection, were not really of huge interest to me. I'm not typically a fan of poetry, but there were a few that I enjoyed. The Hunting of the Snark was a good piece of fun, and there were at least a couple other poems that had a more narrative story to them, that were well done. I liked best the poems where I could easily find a rhythm to the writing, but that is a personal preference for a style of poetry. There isn't really any of the poems that I had any complaints about.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I grew up watching Disney's animated "Alice in Wonderland." I have always loved it but never read the books it was taken from. So I decided it was about time. I was actually a little disappointed. The first book "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" started out quite boring with very little in-depth description. The fantasy was there but it was not really built up. About half-way through it started to get a little better. The second book, "Through the Looking-Glass," was much better than the first, I grew up watching Disney's animated "Alice in Wonderland." I have always loved it but never read the books it was taken from. So I decided it was about time. I was actually a little disappointed. The first book "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" started out quite boring with very little in-depth description. The fantasy was there but it was not really built up. About half-way through it started to get a little better. The second book, "Through the Looking-Glass," was much better than the first, however, I found myself liking the books that came after much better. "Sylvie and Bruno" and it's sequel is a lovely tale of an elderly gentleman and his two little friends, Sylvie and Bruno, who are in fact fairies. He starts out seeing them in his dreams but by the end of the book he is seeing them in real life as are his friends also. This book also contains Lewis Carroll's poetry and some other little stories that contain mathematical problems to solve. I tried two or three of those and got close to the correct answers but didn't quite make it. I'm really not that talented in very advanced math though I did enjoy trying to figure them out. Some of the poetry I like and some I don't but don't go by me on that score as I am not much of a poetry person. Overall, I think it was worth reading. I enjoyed contrasting it to the movie. SPOILER ALERT: I was actually amazed to find that, although the Red Queen, or Queen of Hearts, is always shouting "Off with his head!" no one actually does lose their head. The book explains this but it is not brought out in the movie.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    Reading "Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass" is better than any movie interpretation I have ever seen to date. American McGee's "Alice" video-game comes close, but that has a different take on the whole thing of course. However entertaining the "Alice" books were, it was the "Sylvie & Bruno" stories that stole my heart. Those were written for both children as well as adults, and it shows - they capture the touching profundity that every other conversation with a child seems to en Reading "Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass" is better than any movie interpretation I have ever seen to date. American McGee's "Alice" video-game comes close, but that has a different take on the whole thing of course. However entertaining the "Alice" books were, it was the "Sylvie & Bruno" stories that stole my heart. Those were written for both children as well as adults, and it shows - they capture the touching profundity that every other conversation with a child seems to entail, but have a brilliant sarcasm and satire about the adult world in them as well - considering the very first chapter of "Sylvie & Bruno" is entitled "Less Bread! More Taxes" should say enough ;) After "Sylvie & Bruno" there is a selection of some very nice poems, but then the next few sections are almost entirely "wonderland math problems" - which remind me of the "wayside school" books if they were read with a heavy dose of opiates (or a lighter dose of psychedelics). Still, even though I read the math problems (and then skipped to the solutions without any desire to try to decipher them on my own) I recommend purchasing a copy of this for your library for the simple reason of having "Alice in Wonderland," "Through the Looking Glass," and "Sylvie & Bruno (parts 1 & 2)." Also, his editorials and correspondence with the kids are f---ing hilarious!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bruna Costa

    Lewis Carol is a significant figure in literature, and, given the suggestion to read through all the works of a writer, I decided to read through to his completed works. I enjoyed the first two of his famed and notable stories. Alice in Wonderland is phenomenal and many of his words are famous in the psychological literature as well. The Queen and her impeccable powers of foresight are worth mentioning. “It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,” the Queen remarked. “What sort of thin Lewis Carol is a significant figure in literature, and, given the suggestion to read through all the works of a writer, I decided to read through to his completed works. I enjoyed the first two of his famed and notable stories. Alice in Wonderland is phenomenal and many of his words are famous in the psychological literature as well. The Queen and her impeccable powers of foresight are worth mentioning. “It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,” the Queen remarked. “What sort of things do YOU remember best?” Alice ventured to ask. “Oh, things that happened the week after next,” the Queen replied in a careless tone. Now to speak of Alice. A great character! She's strong, intelligent, curious, open-minded, and reasonable. You gotta love her. Continuing onward here, if you can finish through to the end of his complete works you are a trooper. It's not that fun. I will warn you that it's over 1,000 pages of intellectual verbosity and nonsense. It doesn't quite have the magic of a true story. A character that grips me or goes out and has an adventure is absolutely necessary in my world. I want to know someone. Their story. How they came to be. What shapes them. How darkness came to befall them. How they rose. What strategies they use to survive. Excuse me, but I am so character driven!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Palmer

    The Compete Lewis Carroll is one of a very short list of books I've begun and couldn't get myself to finish. I derived no enjoyment from the book at a certain point and that is where I stopped (Sylvie and Bruno chapter 7). I realized for the last few chapters I had been wondering to myself "how much longer until this is book is done?!". When reading feels like an obligation and chore the book will always be shelved. The Alice stories weren't terrible and themselves would have likely received a 2 The Compete Lewis Carroll is one of a very short list of books I've begun and couldn't get myself to finish. I derived no enjoyment from the book at a certain point and that is where I stopped (Sylvie and Bruno chapter 7). I realized for the last few chapters I had been wondering to myself "how much longer until this is book is done?!". When reading feels like an obligation and chore the book will always be shelved. The Alice stories weren't terrible and themselves would have likely received a 2 star rating from me. Once I hit 'Sylvie and Bruno' all bets were off. The page count was this collections enemy as much as the writing. The continued tossing in of one dimensional often short lived characters among incredibly absurd circumstances began very quickly to wear away at my endurance. The conversation between characters also seemed to be gross repetition of verbal versus text based jokes. You can almost hear the author giggling to himself after writing the one-thousandth conversation revolving around a misunderstood word or mistakenly taken as literal word or phrase. Overall if you want to check out the Alice stories go ahead but I very much recommend picking them up individually and avoiding the rest of Lewis Carroll's writing.

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