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From Crisis to Calling: Finding Your Moral Center in the Toughest Decisions

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Making the Hardest Decisions As a young aid worker, Sasha Chanoff was sent to evacuate a group of refugees from the violence-torn Congo. But when he arrived he discovered a second group. Evacuating them too could endanger the entire mission. But leaving them behind would mean their certain death. All leaders face defining moments, when values are in conflict and decisions Making the Hardest Decisions As a young aid worker, Sasha Chanoff was sent to evacuate a group of refugees from the violence-torn Congo. But when he arrived he discovered a second group. Evacuating them too could endanger the entire mission. But leaving them behind would mean their certain death. All leaders face defining moments, when values are in conflict and decisions impact lives. Why is moral courage the essential factor at such times? How do we access our own rock-bottom values, and how can we take advantage of them to make the best decisions? Through Sasha's own extraordinary story and those of eight other brave leaders from business, government, nongovernment organizations, and the military, this book reveals five principles for confronting crucial decisions and inspires all of us to use our moral core as a lodestar for leadership.


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Making the Hardest Decisions As a young aid worker, Sasha Chanoff was sent to evacuate a group of refugees from the violence-torn Congo. But when he arrived he discovered a second group. Evacuating them too could endanger the entire mission. But leaving them behind would mean their certain death. All leaders face defining moments, when values are in conflict and decisions Making the Hardest Decisions As a young aid worker, Sasha Chanoff was sent to evacuate a group of refugees from the violence-torn Congo. But when he arrived he discovered a second group. Evacuating them too could endanger the entire mission. But leaving them behind would mean their certain death. All leaders face defining moments, when values are in conflict and decisions impact lives. Why is moral courage the essential factor at such times? How do we access our own rock-bottom values, and how can we take advantage of them to make the best decisions? Through Sasha's own extraordinary story and those of eight other brave leaders from business, government, nongovernment organizations, and the military, this book reveals five principles for confronting crucial decisions and inspires all of us to use our moral core as a lodestar for leadership.

55 review for From Crisis to Calling: Finding Your Moral Center in the Toughest Decisions

  1. 4 out of 5

    Vernita Naylor

    “Ask yourself who am I, when faced with making tough decisions?” says Sasha Chanoff, RefugePoint Founder, as he introduced his upcoming book, From Crisis To Calling: Finding Your Moral Center in the Toughest Decisions. I met Sasha and his father, David during a Meet the Author Event at Berrett-Koehler, as they explained the concept behind their book. From Crisis To Calling: Finding Your Moral Center in the Toughest Decisions by Sasha Chanoff and David Chanoff is ideal for all types of leaders f “Ask yourself who am I, when faced with making tough decisions?” says Sasha Chanoff, RefugePoint Founder, as he introduced his upcoming book, From Crisis To Calling: Finding Your Moral Center in the Toughest Decisions. I met Sasha and his father, David during a Meet the Author Event at Berrett-Koehler, as they explained the concept behind their book. From Crisis To Calling: Finding Your Moral Center in the Toughest Decisions by Sasha Chanoff and David Chanoff is ideal for all types of leaders from church and religious groups and business owners to C-Suite executives. During the time that Sasha told us about the premises behind From Crisis To Calling: Finding Your Moral Center in the Toughest Decisions by Sasha Chanoff and David Chanoff it put me in the remembrance of the movie, Hotel Rwanda. Whether you are familiar with the movie or not, let me tell you a little bit about the backdrop of the book and how it applies to the Five-Step Pathway to Moral Decision Making that was created. In 1994, there was a mandate to eradicate the Tutsi population. The Rwanda genocide (aka the genocide against the Tutsi), lasted for over 100 days with over 500,000 killed by the high-level Hutu government. This genocidal act occurred during the Rwandan Civil War, that began in 1990. Sasha and colleague, Sheikha Ali were asked by their boss, David Derthick, International Organization for Migration (IOM) to oversee an evacuation of 112 Tutsi men, women, and children and was provided with a list of those evacuees. They were strongly advised not take anyone else from the compound, except for those on the list. As Sasha and Sheikha were at the compound preparing to evacuate the evacuees according to the list, they were told about over twenty women and children (including infants that looked like dolls), in a tent, that had been held in a military prison, in Kanagawa, for sixteen months. The individuals appeared to be close to death with graying skin, unaware of their surroundings and shock like appearance. The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) asked for Sasha and Sheikha to take these women and children as well during their evacuation. The question is should Sasha and Sheikha deviate from the list or stay focused on the task at hand? Sasha was set as the leader because Sheikha was known to having such a soft heart. The Five-Step Pathway to Moral Decision Making consist of the following values: 1) Be prepared, 2) Open your eyes, 3) Confront yourself, 4) Know yourself and 5) Take courage, that will position you as an effective leader when being faced with those defining moments. Sasha used these elements to help him to navigate his way through the tough decisions that he faced, of evacuating the 112 vs the women and children from the tent. From Crisis to Calling: Finding Your Moral Center in the Toughest Decisions

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    This is a book of two parts. The first part, as the author recounts his experiences of dealing with refugees in a Congolese camp, and the heartbreaking decisions about who could be saved with limited resources, is excellent if horrifying. The second part, where lessons are drawn from a variety of other individuals, is less impressive, and seems almost perfunctory. If bought as a guide to leadership (I picked up my copy through the Hacking Capitalism bundle), I would suggest pay attention to the f This is a book of two parts. The first part, as the author recounts his experiences of dealing with refugees in a Congolese camp, and the heartbreaking decisions about who could be saved with limited resources, is excellent if horrifying. The second part, where lessons are drawn from a variety of other individuals, is less impressive, and seems almost perfunctory. If bought as a guide to leadership (I picked up my copy through the Hacking Capitalism bundle), I would suggest pay attention to the first section, seek out more information on it if possible, and the remainder is largely potted reinforcement. In any case, I read it on the bus, so it's not exactly a challenging text from a literary point of view. It probably deserves a little more than three stars, but I can't honestly say the book as a whole is in the "really liked" category, so three it gets.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Evan McDaniel

  4. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

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    Richard

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    sophia walsh

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jo-bunny

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie Martin

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    Mark Masterson

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    Alam Kasenally

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michele Whitehead

  12. 4 out of 5

    A.campanellaverizon.net

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kira

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    Wei Jiun Lim

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hamed Al-Hamdan

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    Drew Jeffrey

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    Christy Nouchi

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    Barbara Penzner

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    Makenna sherry

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    Benjamin Peters

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    MJ

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    John

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    Frederick Rotzien

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    Ms. Reader

  55. 4 out of 5

    Richard

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