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Meet Me At Infinity: The Uncollected Tiptree: Fiction and Nonfiction

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James Tiptree, Jr. was the pseudonym of Alice B. Sheldon (1915-1987), in whose honor the Tiptree Awards are given annually. She wrote some of the best short SF ever, winning two Hugos and three Nebulas. This book brings together stories previously uncollected-including an early one published under her own name in The New Yorker-and many of her colorful non-fiction pieces, James Tiptree, Jr. was the pseudonym of Alice B. Sheldon (1915-1987), in whose honor the Tiptree Awards are given annually. She wrote some of the best short SF ever, winning two Hugos and three Nebulas. This book brings together stories previously uncollected-including an early one published under her own name in The New Yorker-and many of her colorful non-fiction pieces, mainly autobiographical, published under the Tiptree name (1970-1987). What shines through in this book is the magnetic and charming personality of the author, one of the most influential SF personalities of her era.


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James Tiptree, Jr. was the pseudonym of Alice B. Sheldon (1915-1987), in whose honor the Tiptree Awards are given annually. She wrote some of the best short SF ever, winning two Hugos and three Nebulas. This book brings together stories previously uncollected-including an early one published under her own name in The New Yorker-and many of her colorful non-fiction pieces, James Tiptree, Jr. was the pseudonym of Alice B. Sheldon (1915-1987), in whose honor the Tiptree Awards are given annually. She wrote some of the best short SF ever, winning two Hugos and three Nebulas. This book brings together stories previously uncollected-including an early one published under her own name in The New Yorker-and many of her colorful non-fiction pieces, mainly autobiographical, published under the Tiptree name (1970-1987). What shines through in this book is the magnetic and charming personality of the author, one of the most influential SF personalities of her era.

30 review for Meet Me At Infinity: The Uncollected Tiptree: Fiction and Nonfiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Linda Robinson

    This is a good book for those who are not familiar with the story of James Tiptree Jr., as the majority of pages are letters to the person who compiled these previously uncollected works. A good book to get to know Alice Bradley Sheldon, and track the writer's career. Especially interesting - naturally - is the difficulty she had getting published and collected after the world found out she was a woman. There is an unfortunate hint in this book that part of that issue was that maybe her writing This is a good book for those who are not familiar with the story of James Tiptree Jr., as the majority of pages are letters to the person who compiled these previously uncollected works. A good book to get to know Alice Bradley Sheldon, and track the writer's career. Especially interesting - naturally - is the difficulty she had getting published and collected after the world found out she was a woman. There is an unfortunate hint in this book that part of that issue was that maybe her writing style changed when she wrote as a woman. I need more evidence of that before I accept that implied premise.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I wish more editors would put out concept collections like this. This book is a collection of James Tiptree Jr.'s previously uncollected fiction and nonfiction (or Alice Sheldon's, depending on if you prefer her real name over nom de plume). While most of the fiction isn't her best--the short pieces especially are, in a word, weird; more like flash fiction experiments than stories--the nonfiction is what makes the book fascinating. Compiled by her friend and former fanzine editor Jeffrey D. Smit I wish more editors would put out concept collections like this. This book is a collection of James Tiptree Jr.'s previously uncollected fiction and nonfiction (or Alice Sheldon's, depending on if you prefer her real name over nom de plume). While most of the fiction isn't her best--the short pieces especially are, in a word, weird; more like flash fiction experiments than stories--the nonfiction is what makes the book fascinating. Compiled by her friend and former fanzine editor Jeffrey D. Smith, the nonfiction section represents Tiptree's letters, essays, and interviews from both before and after her real-life identity came out. Highlights for me were "Everything but the Signature is Me" (the first, semi-confessional letter she wrote to Smith after her identity was revealed); the interview and biography she did for Contemporary Authors (did you know her mother was a total badass, an African explorer and WWII war correspondent?); and the searing "Zero at the Bone", published for the first time in this collection.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James Jankiewicz

    Excellent deep dive into Tiptree (Alice Sheldon) and her fascinating background, persona and art. I found this wonderful description of her on an Amazon review that sums her up well, "For one, Tiptree has a habit of using her original diction, often jargon specific to the narrators' lifestyles, without explaining any of it. Usually I'm able to read through without pause, gathering the meanings of these words from their context, but every now and then I would have to read the same paragraph over Excellent deep dive into Tiptree (Alice Sheldon) and her fascinating background, persona and art. I found this wonderful description of her on an Amazon review that sums her up well, "For one, Tiptree has a habit of using her original diction, often jargon specific to the narrators' lifestyles, without explaining any of it. Usually I'm able to read through without pause, gathering the meanings of these words from their context, but every now and then I would have to read the same paragraph over and over, and rarely did rereading make it any clearer. I appreciate the skill with which Tiptree usually accomplishes this skill, but be forewarned that there may be places in the prose where some degree of confusion is inevitable." This is so true of her art; the challenge and the intrigue of her style and stories is further explore here in her 'cast-off' stories, letters to her lead fan, afterwords she provided for her stories, and her autobiographical biographical sketch, which is a quire fascinating read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Meet Me at Infinity offers insight into Tiptree/Alli’s perspective. The non-fiction was especially fascinating, and I enjoyed reading her take on writing SF. There were two short stories that stood out to me here: Trey of Hearts and The Color of Neanderthal Eyes. TH because it’s interesting to see a woman write an FMM scene in which there is a lot of love. CNE was fascinating for a variety of reasons, and involved Tip playing with gender reveals in a way that challenges rules of attraction (not Meet Me at Infinity offers insight into Tiptree/Alli’s perspective. The non-fiction was especially fascinating, and I enjoyed reading her take on writing SF. There were two short stories that stood out to me here: Trey of Hearts and The Color of Neanderthal Eyes. TH because it’s interesting to see a woman write an FMM scene in which there is a lot of love. CNE was fascinating for a variety of reasons, and involved Tip playing with gender reveals in a way that challenges rules of attraction (not necessarily in an LGBT-positive way, as in With Delicate Mad Hands). Overall I liked this collection a lot, and am more convinced that Tip deserves more attention than she gets today.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Greg Lehman

    Insightful, hilarious, and always brave, Sheldon’s candidness and imagination are at full capacity here in this collection of both her fiction and non-fiction, much of which could be read as a manifesto for the current battles women face. Her letters, stories, and essays pull off nothing short of baring a soul that is wholly unafraid to weep for the destruction she sees, or to ever stop fighting the good fights against oppression and greed. Easily the best book I’ve read this year so far, like e Insightful, hilarious, and always brave, Sheldon’s candidness and imagination are at full capacity here in this collection of both her fiction and non-fiction, much of which could be read as a manifesto for the current battles women face. Her letters, stories, and essays pull off nothing short of baring a soul that is wholly unafraid to weep for the destruction she sees, or to ever stop fighting the good fights against oppression and greed. Easily the best book I’ve read this year so far, like everything else I read by her I was sorry to have it end.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Helena

    Nothing particularly wrong with it -- it's just I didn't realize it was uncollected material -- more for someone studying science fiction writers of that era than something a person would read for fun. Nothing particularly wrong with it -- it's just I didn't realize it was uncollected material -- more for someone studying science fiction writers of that era than something a person would read for fun.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sonia

    Colección de relatos poco conocidos de Tiptree que no me dicen nada.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marie Michaels

    This is a bunch of her lesser-know pieces, both stories (not done solely under the Tiptree name) and letters, chosen by the editor as relating somehow to her personal life. A lot of them are pieces that were rejected or published in tiny magazines. The idea is to give a sense of her through these pieces, which is a cool concept. The first piece, "Happiness is a Warm Spaceship" is really kooky. It's very cool getting a look at the person behind the alias; it's amazing but depressing that her lett This is a bunch of her lesser-know pieces, both stories (not done solely under the Tiptree name) and letters, chosen by the editor as relating somehow to her personal life. A lot of them are pieces that were rejected or published in tiny magazines. The idea is to give a sense of her through these pieces, which is a cool concept. The first piece, "Happiness is a Warm Spaceship" is really kooky. It's very cool getting a look at the person behind the alias; it's amazing but depressing that her letters are better, funnier, more evocative and more thoughtprovoking than pieces I spend months with. Ah well!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dale

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charles

  12. 5 out of 5

    Are Sørli

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Nugent

  14. 4 out of 5

    Samfish9999

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dirk

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lael Birch

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steph

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joel Nichols

  20. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena

  21. 4 out of 5

    Duane

  22. 5 out of 5

    Clint F.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Julian Jenkinson

  24. 4 out of 5

    David

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sheherazahde

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  28. 5 out of 5

    BL834

  29. 5 out of 5

    Charles

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stevenj

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