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Rasputin, Vol. 2: The Road to the White House

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What really happened at that fateful dinner and how did Rasputin survive his plunge into the icy river in 1916? All is revealed as a new life begins for the mad monk at Ellis Island. Collects RASPUTIN #6-10.


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What really happened at that fateful dinner and how did Rasputin survive his plunge into the icy river in 1916? All is revealed as a new life begins for the mad monk at Ellis Island. Collects RASPUTIN #6-10.

30 review for Rasputin, Vol. 2: The Road to the White House

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Alex Grecian and Riley Rossmo’s alternate take on the life of Rasputin comes to an end in this second and final book, The Road to the White House. It picks up towards the end of WW1, just before the revolution, and, if you’re already familiar with Rasputin’s real history, you’ll know he was shortly murdered thereafter. But in this version, weirder things happen and events conspire to send him across the pond to the capitalist utopia that is America. The first volume was just ok, this second one i Alex Grecian and Riley Rossmo’s alternate take on the life of Rasputin comes to an end in this second and final book, The Road to the White House. It picks up towards the end of WW1, just before the revolution, and, if you’re already familiar with Rasputin’s real history, you’ll know he was shortly murdered thereafter. But in this version, weirder things happen and events conspire to send him across the pond to the capitalist utopia that is America. The first volume was just ok, this second one is kinda crap. Ironically the tacked on stuff Grecian/Rossmo made up is less interesting than the actual events of Rasputin’s last days, proving that truth isn’t just stranger than fiction, in this instance it’s more compelling too. He becomes a political advisor in America and that’s his happy ever after - meh. Was he really a brilliant political strategist? We don’t really see it in his time in Russia. But the part where he’s "killed" in 1916? That was great. Fine, the creators didn’t want to do a straightforward retelling of Rasputin’s life but the magic necromancer powers, ghosts, and ice giant gods (and I know what I’m describing sounds great but it’s quite bland I assure you) felt like standard fantasy fare. Rossmo’s art though is quite good and I liked his design of the ice giant god. I’d recommend Philip Gelatt/Tyler Crook’s Petrograd over Grecian/Rossmo’s more fanciful Rasputin books but it’s actually not that much better. The odd thing is that comics writers tackling Rasputin tend to produce stories that are far more underwhelming than the simple effect an ordinary history book (or Wikipedia entry) can elicit in the reader on the subject - and I’d recommend reading those instead of these sub-par comics!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    "Starets, won't you have this glass of wine?" I'm fairly certain Rasputin was not a man of mythological proportions, but I enjoyed a glimpse into what that might look like. I've always enjoyed the typical mad monk who couldn't die tale, and was honestly surprised to see a comic surrounding the stories. This isn't your evil magician rasputin from Anastasia, but neither is he an honest hearted faith healer. This Rasputin is an amalgam of Jesus, Dracula, and some guy who kicks ass. And it kicks ass. R "Starets, won't you have this glass of wine?" I'm fairly certain Rasputin was not a man of mythological proportions, but I enjoyed a glimpse into what that might look like. I've always enjoyed the typical mad monk who couldn't die tale, and was honestly surprised to see a comic surrounding the stories. This isn't your evil magician rasputin from Anastasia, but neither is he an honest hearted faith healer. This Rasputin is an amalgam of Jesus, Dracula, and some guy who kicks ass. And it kicks ass. Reviewed with honesty for Netgalley.(honestly)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    I admit I picked this up at the library since it had a cool cover. Plus it was about Rasputin. I should have known better. In essence Rasputin never died and seems that he can not die. If he is killed he resurrects himself. So since his time in Russia, Rasputin has been in the US. He took Princess Anastasia and Prince Nicholas away when the Communist peasants were storming the Winter Palace. Since then he has been helping people by resurrecting them- from JFK to some Hillary Clinton based Govern I admit I picked this up at the library since it had a cool cover. Plus it was about Rasputin. I should have known better. In essence Rasputin never died and seems that he can not die. If he is killed he resurrects himself. So since his time in Russia, Rasputin has been in the US. He took Princess Anastasia and Prince Nicholas away when the Communist peasants were storming the Winter Palace. Since then he has been helping people by resurrecting them- from JFK to some Hillary Clinton based Governor in modern times. That's pretty much the gist. Some reporter has found the evidence and is now interviewing him a la Interview with a Vampire. That's it. Has some cool parts like where some random Prince Koscihka kills a giant..and then Rasputin kills him. Shows Rasputin being killed (and then resurrecting himself) in the famous event from real life....I didn't know where this was going. Not sure his motivations. It seems Rasputin is/was a nice guy. Who knew? Perhaps the better question would be: who cares? Not I. The art is mediocre. The plot is confusing. What does he want? What are his motivations? Is he a hero? I guess. I'll take a pass on this series.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Rasputin Volume 2' by Alex Grecian with art by Riley Rossmo continues Rasputin's story in modern day America. Apparently, Rasputin is alive and well and running around with a female candidate named Harrison who is running for president. When an attempt is made on her life, Rasputin uses his special "gift" to help her. A lone reporter sees this and now wants to get his story. The story of his life is then told in a series of flashbacks: the people he has saved, the ghosts of the ones he didn't th 'Rasputin Volume 2' by Alex Grecian with art by Riley Rossmo continues Rasputin's story in modern day America. Apparently, Rasputin is alive and well and running around with a female candidate named Harrison who is running for president. When an attempt is made on her life, Rasputin uses his special "gift" to help her. A lone reporter sees this and now wants to get his story. The story of his life is then told in a series of flashbacks: the people he has saved, the ghosts of the ones he didn't that linger around him. Woven into the story is Abraham Zapruder (father of Kennedy assassination filmer George Zapruder). We also run into Nicholas and Alexandra. I like the scope of the story. I like the touches of magic that weave through Rasputin's life, not always for the best. The art was ok, but not my favorite. It's an interesting story. I might have to go back and read the first issue now. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Image Comics, Diamond Book Distributors, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  5. 4 out of 5

    47Time

    The WW1 setting is left behind, in favor of a presidential campaign in 2016 when a candidate is shot dead during a rally. Rasputin, who hasn't aged a day since WW1, brings her back to life, but keeps the event secret from the public. The reporter Shanae Tolliver witnessed it and threatens to throw a spanner in the works. She shows him evidence that he came to America in 1920 and then healed JFK whose assassination attempt is removed from public knowledge. (view spoiler)[Believing the Mad Monk dea The WW1 setting is left behind, in favor of a presidential campaign in 2016 when a candidate is shot dead during a rally. Rasputin, who hasn't aged a day since WW1, brings her back to life, but keeps the event secret from the public. The reporter Shanae Tolliver witnessed it and threatens to throw a spanner in the works. She shows him evidence that he came to America in 1920 and then healed JFK whose assassination attempt is removed from public knowledge. (view spoiler)[Believing the Mad Monk dead, the people took to the streets with Rasputin unable to stop it. The royal family was butchered by the revolutionaries. Anastasia and Alexei survived thanks to Rasputin who took them to America. Shanae knows she can't publish Rasputin's story as nobody would believe her. Rasputin gives her his journal where he detailed his whole life. He wants his story public, but allows her to see to it however she sees fit. (hide spoiler)]

  6. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    I liked this volume because it's a unique angle to the Rasputin story that hasn't been done before, but I still feel like the whole series could have been a bit more coherent if they hadn't waited until volume 2 for the 'big reveal' or maybe if there had been 3 volumes instead of just two as the entire thing did feel a little bit rushed. Still it was a cool idea and the art continues to be absolutely gorgeous.

  7. 4 out of 5

    The_Mad_Swede

    Having really enjoyed the first volume, The Road to the Winter Palace , I really wanted to finish writer Alex Grecian and artist Riley Rossmo's series Rasputin. Unfortunately, while it is certainly not a bad comic per se, this volume let me down fundamentally, by suddenly shifting the premise of the tale fundamentally. The first five issues had established Rasputin as the narrator and his tale one re-imagined by Grecian and Rosso in terms of myth and fantasy, which worked really well there. Al Having really enjoyed the first volume, The Road to the Winter Palace , I really wanted to finish writer Alex Grecian and artist Riley Rossmo's series Rasputin. Unfortunately, while it is certainly not a bad comic per se, this volume let me down fundamentally, by suddenly shifting the premise of the tale fundamentally. The first five issues had established Rasputin as the narrator and his tale one re-imagined by Grecian and Rosso in terms of myth and fantasy, which worked really well there. Already the opening of this volume (and the final five issues), suddenly changes the instance of narrating and moves Rasputin to the US in 2016. Now, this in and of itself would not necessarily have been a turnoff for me, given that the idea that Rasputin survived even his final supposed death is an interesting one (especially as solved by the creative team, to be honest), and the continued story in Russia up until the revolution certainly matches the tale of the first volume. No, my problem is rather that Rasputin's survival and move to the US has also instigated an alternative history, because of events which I will not reveal here. Obviously, I do not mind alternative history fiction by any means, but volume one has not really posited the tale to be such a tale. In other words, whereas the first volume offered me a fantastic take on actual history, which certainly could have led into a fantastic present day with Rasputin revealed to be still alive, the second volume asks me to see history itself as changed (rather than explained) by the fantastic elements. All in all, it is not so much bad as just very disappointing, which leaves me with three weakish stars.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Scott Lee

    This volume opens with the revelation that Rasputin has survived to a fictional version of our own day and then moves backward to catch up the reader with present day interjections throughout. Thus, it follows the plotting structure in the first volume, except with a "present" set in our own day rather than on the dawn of the 1917 revolution. Present Rasputin doesn't get to do much--the plot for that era consists of him getting found out and then telling his story--but the story that explains ho This volume opens with the revelation that Rasputin has survived to a fictional version of our own day and then moves backward to catch up the reader with present day interjections throughout. Thus, it follows the plotting structure in the first volume, except with a "present" set in our own day rather than on the dawn of the 1917 revolution. Present Rasputin doesn't get to do much--the plot for that era consists of him getting found out and then telling his story--but the story that explains how it is he might be here, and the alterations from our own history that are implied by the flashbacks shown establish his presence in a world like but not our own. I hope that this series continues. I'd really like to see some adventures for this character that happened truly in the moment rather than discussions in the moment of past action. I'll take that if that's all I can get though, so long as this team keeps the books coming. I failed to mention the art in my review of volume one and must do so or be truly remiss here. The art is spectacular--fittingly dark and idiosyncratic but more than narrative enough in itself to allow for pages of wordless story. The detail is impressive, and the style fits the tone of the book perfectly. I can think of several titles I'd love to see this artist work on, which, for me at least, is always an indication I've found a penciler/art team that I really like.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    When I saw this supernatural story about Rasputin I IMMEDIATELY had to get my hands on it. And I am pleased to that I was thoroughly surprised by this. Firstly, the artwork is incredible! It may be my favorite artist work so far. It really captures the somber tone during this period of Russian history which is then juxtaposed next to these bright and whimsical panels of the supernatural elements. Absolutely stunning! I don't know much about Rasputin, but I recall watching a segment about Anastas When I saw this supernatural story about Rasputin I IMMEDIATELY had to get my hands on it. And I am pleased to that I was thoroughly surprised by this. Firstly, the artwork is incredible! It may be my favorite artist work so far. It really captures the somber tone during this period of Russian history which is then juxtaposed next to these bright and whimsical panels of the supernatural elements. Absolutely stunning! I don't know much about Rasputin, but I recall watching a segment about Anastasia and just remember seeing those cold dead eyes staring straight into my soul. That piqued my interest in him and I learned more about him by reading about the Romanov family. A lot of mystery surrounds Rasputin and this Russian folklore inspired tale takes an interesting and refreshing look into the life of this polarizing figure. Definitely worth the read!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Yaaseen Jooma

    I'm not sure about this one. I really enjoyed Volume 1 and was hoping volume 2 would have a similar feel. It didn't. The graphics were good overall, especially the ones featuring all the supernatural Siberian ice-desert creatures (whatever they're called) and the phantom spirits hanging around Rasputin. It felt like a happy trip to the Forbidden forest only a less menacing one full of sparkly Patronuses. However, the actual plot felt really clumsy, moving back and forth time-frames, the characte I'm not sure about this one. I really enjoyed Volume 1 and was hoping volume 2 would have a similar feel. It didn't. The graphics were good overall, especially the ones featuring all the supernatural Siberian ice-desert creatures (whatever they're called) and the phantom spirits hanging around Rasputin. It felt like a happy trip to the Forbidden forest only a less menacing one full of sparkly Patronuses. However, the actual plot felt really clumsy, moving back and forth time-frames, the characters flat and boring and scenes short and rushed. I haven't given up entirely on the series though, and am hoping Volume 3 will be much better and more connected thematically to the first volume. So until Volume 3 arrives, I guess it's do svidanya Rasputin.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    This second, and final, volume is certainly the 'reimagined' part. We continue our journey through the life of Rasputin, but now we find out what may have happen if he survived the attack from his friends which killed him. Now in America, what will Rasputin use his powers of rejuvenation for? It is a very interesting concept and I really enjoyed it. I like how they kept it contained as it would have been easy to run further with the story but it would have become too much, I think.

  12. 5 out of 5

    B

    Vol.2 feels a little disconnected from Vol.1, but it's a little more bold with what it does with the subject material. Rossmo's art is definitely still the highlight, but the story is solid if not a little rushed to its conclusion.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Random

    This story (including the first book) was more intriguing than I expected. A real page turner. It ended too abruptly for me, with questions about the nature of ... certain important characters unexplained.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Spot

    i am probably missing something by getting #2 first. was ok, but not great

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    Part 2 asks the question, how would history be different if Rasputin survived his execution and lived in modern day America? FYI things change.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian Song

    Sadly Alex's retelling seems indecisive on its genre. The art, however, remains a visual feast.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Justin Lee

    The art and story worked for me. I would love more of this!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    Beautiful art and engaging story. I would definitely read on in the story!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Logan Young

    Kinda disappointed with the second half of this story. The art was still amazing, but I didn't really like where Grecian took the story of having Rasputin running a candidate in the 2016 election. That might partially be due to my personal bias and with retrospective knowledge of the shit-show that election was, but it was kinda... dumb. It didn't work at all. And I don't understand if this story is supposed to be taking place in our world or some parallel universe, because apparently in the wor Kinda disappointed with the second half of this story. The art was still amazing, but I didn't really like where Grecian took the story of having Rasputin running a candidate in the 2016 election. That might partially be due to my personal bias and with retrospective knowledge of the shit-show that election was, but it was kinda... dumb. It didn't work at all. And I don't understand if this story is supposed to be taking place in our world or some parallel universe, because apparently in the world of this story (view spoiler)[Rasputin healed JFK after he was shot in the head, and then there were multiple Kennedy presidents??? (hide spoiler)] Also the first volume perfectly balanced the fantasy elements with historical facts, while this one went kinda overboard with the fantasy. The real history of Rasputin (mostly his death) turned out to be far more interesting than the fiction made about him.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Trinity

    A fascinating alternate history version of Rasputin. The Mad Monk has appeared in many alternate takes on history, but this one is genuinely surprising in parts. Blends folklore, history, and inspiration well. Highly recommended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    In this second volume, readers jump to the present day, where Rasputin is alive & well, working as an aide to a presidential hopeful. A savvy onlooker with a camera catches the starets healing his boss after a botched assassination attempt & later confronts him with the evidence. The rest of the story flashes back to how Rasputin survived Yusupov's deadly dinner party & gives a few hints as to what he's been doing in the intervening years. The collection ends abruptly but not before planting see In this second volume, readers jump to the present day, where Rasputin is alive & well, working as an aide to a presidential hopeful. A savvy onlooker with a camera catches the starets healing his boss after a botched assassination attempt & later confronts him with the evidence. The rest of the story flashes back to how Rasputin survived Yusupov's deadly dinner party & gives a few hints as to what he's been doing in the intervening years. The collection ends abruptly but not before planting seeds to an interesting alternate history that I hope the creators get to explore further. Overall, I liked this volume better than the first; it's completely committed to it's alt-history premise which reflects better on some of the event streamlining of the first 5 issues. And what crazy fun some of those alt-history ideas are! Did you know that not only are the Russian royal children alive, they were adopted by the Zapruders. Y'know, like the name of the guy who filmed JFK's assassination? And, BTW, did you know that JFK is not dead, saved by our starets himself? (Can't say the same about Jackie though, pity.) Grecian & Rossimo also return to alternating Russian folklore with the action scenes here, which I like. But it does make me wonder how their story would have changed once they took their character out of his homeland. I can see how future issues could have looked like a slick action-y anti-hero story with plenty of supernatural & mythical touches. But this might be all that we readers get. Definitely a mini-series to check out if you're curious, but borrow from a friend or the library before totally committing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul Franco

    Considering I’ve read a graphic novel about a Japanese monk from hundreds of years ago, the story of the legendary Russian mystic doesn’t seem nearly as weird in comparison. Someone kills a Hillary Clinton clone at a speech only to have Rasputin bring her back to life as he talks about watching his father die in the snow. A reporter saw him do it and wants to know how it happened, and the story switches between the present and his telling of how he became the way he is. Which is incredibly confu Considering I’ve read a graphic novel about a Japanese monk from hundreds of years ago, the story of the legendary Russian mystic doesn’t seem nearly as weird in comparison. Someone kills a Hillary Clinton clone at a speech only to have Rasputin bring her back to life as he talks about watching his father die in the snow. A reporter saw him do it and wants to know how it happened, and the story switches between the present and his telling of how he became the way he is. Which is incredibly confusing. I’ve done a bunch of research on Rasputin, and if this is how he managed to survive all those assassination attempts. . . hell, it’s as good as any other. But I still didn’t understand how it worked, and I doubt the reporter did either. There appears to be plenty of clues in the narrative, they just didn’t mesh. At one point it’s said he saved JFK after he was shot, making this an alternate universe, but I didn’t understand what that had to do with the story. What really saves it is the humor; there’s one point where he actually says, “Be quiet, ghost.” Yeah, that’ll work. I’m not a fan of the artwork; too angular. However, props to the depiction of Maria, who is the cutest little blonde girl I’ve ever seen drawn. The snow fairy—I doubt that’s what it was but can find no other way to describe it—is also beautifully done. Bonus—script, complete with links and spelling mistakes; quotes, bios. The final grade below is more for the story than the artwork, although it was damned confusing at times.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris Thompson

    While not quite as good as the first volume, Rasputin: The Road to the White House is still a good read. It makes a significant jump in time from the previous volume, to the 2000s, as Rasputin saves the life of a politician, Harrison, after an assassination attempt. The story jumps back and forth through time, answering reader's questions about how Rasputin has survived for so long. Some reviewers mention confusion about certain details, such as how Rasputin returns to life, but the comic is act While not quite as good as the first volume, Rasputin: The Road to the White House is still a good read. It makes a significant jump in time from the previous volume, to the 2000s, as Rasputin saves the life of a politician, Harrison, after an assassination attempt. The story jumps back and forth through time, answering reader's questions about how Rasputin has survived for so long. Some reviewers mention confusion about certain details, such as how Rasputin returns to life, but the comic is actually pretty clear on most of its details, I think. We learn a new trick to his powers. Those he allows to die remain to haunt him as ghosts. Their souls enter him at death and revive him. The artwork is okay overall. Riley Rossmo is best when drawing the large multi-page landscapes, but in smaller panels is hit or miss. Character emotion is not a strong suit either. Ivan Plascencia uses dull colors, perhaps indicating Rasputin's desire to not be noticed. This volume transforms into an Interview with a Vampire of sorts. The flashbacks occur through Rasputin's conversation with a freelance reporter who has discovered who he is through, of all things, his connection with John F. Kennedy, apparently having saved his life. This is perhaps a story for future issues, as well as his current quest with Harrison, but it seems the story is done. I have no idea if Alex Grecian plans on continuing this series, which is a shame.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stabbing

    A somewhat interesting alternate fantasy history for historical figure Grigori Rasputin. Unfortunately this volume doesn't stand up by itself and I found the whole thing rather confusing. The story jumps back and forth in time from present day America to the last days of the reign of Tsar Nicholas II. Maybe if I'd read the first volume I would have love it but I'm just not sure. It certainly seemed as if it had the potential to be quite fantastical but it ended up feeling like you just got previ A somewhat interesting alternate fantasy history for historical figure Grigori Rasputin. Unfortunately this volume doesn't stand up by itself and I found the whole thing rather confusing. The story jumps back and forth in time from present day America to the last days of the reign of Tsar Nicholas II. Maybe if I'd read the first volume I would have love it but I'm just not sure. It certainly seemed as if it had the potential to be quite fantastical but it ended up feeling like you just got preview scenes from a larger story. Extended review with pictures: https://stabbingstardust.wordpress.co... I received an advance reader copy of this book through NetGalley's Read It Now selections.

  25. 5 out of 5

    William Dale

    We finally are told the story of how Rasputin was famously killed... and then lived again according to this series. What a great sequel to an almost perfect first volume. This volume starts out in the present day which threw me off, but goes back in time to tell Gregori's tale which I found much more interesting than the present day plot line. The art was stunning in places and just mediocre in others but it more than makes up for any deficiency by pushing the envelope in certain parts of the bo We finally are told the story of how Rasputin was famously killed... and then lived again according to this series. What a great sequel to an almost perfect first volume. This volume starts out in the present day which threw me off, but goes back in time to tell Gregori's tale which I found much more interesting than the present day plot line. The art was stunning in places and just mediocre in others but it more than makes up for any deficiency by pushing the envelope in certain parts of the book. The story is a sweeping arc and finally answers questions left from the first book. Such a great series!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    A new look at one of history’s “villains” Not having read Volume 1, this was a bit of a mystery at first. This Rasputin travels through history, manipulating circumstances and using healing powers for his own benefit, leaving him accompanied by the ghosts of those that he has killed as her “enjoys” eternal life. He recounts parts of his life to a freelance journalist. Cartoon-type illustrations work well here, reminiscent of the French “bande dessinée” style and there’s plenty of bloodshed. Perhap A new look at one of history’s “villains” Not having read Volume 1, this was a bit of a mystery at first. This Rasputin travels through history, manipulating circumstances and using healing powers for his own benefit, leaving him accompanied by the ghosts of those that he has killed as her “enjoys” eternal life. He recounts parts of his life to a freelance journalist. Cartoon-type illustrations work well here, reminiscent of the French “bande dessinée” style and there’s plenty of bloodshed. Perhaps a bit brief when it comes to plot. However a good yarn, well recommended.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Very hard to judge this book whatsoever without having seen the first volume, but it really does at times feel like the authors were only told too late in the day that having an immortal anti-hero kind of leaves you with no excitement and not many places to go, so they tacked on some weird alternative history concerning a certain Dallas-based assassination to pep things up. Too many splash pages that don't have much impact, bizarre mythology regarding Rasputin's powers and other ghosts throughou Very hard to judge this book whatsoever without having seen the first volume, but it really does at times feel like the authors were only told too late in the day that having an immortal anti-hero kind of leaves you with no excitement and not many places to go, so they tacked on some weird alternative history concerning a certain Dallas-based assassination to pep things up. Too many splash pages that don't have much impact, bizarre mythology regarding Rasputin's powers and other ghosts throughout history, and an exceedingly bitty narrative don't do things many favours, either.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    A sloppy follow-up to a great first volume. This volume answers the question what happened to Rasputin after he was killed by his friends in 1916. It starts out in our time and stays there for pretty much the first issue. I found this very confusing. The stuff with JFK was just dumb. Why change history if you don't show the impact of that change? Riley Rossmo is an enigma. His art can be frustratingly bad and great on the same page. Received an advance copy from NetGalley in exchange for an hones A sloppy follow-up to a great first volume. This volume answers the question what happened to Rasputin after he was killed by his friends in 1916. It starts out in our time and stays there for pretty much the first issue. I found this very confusing. The stuff with JFK was just dumb. Why change history if you don't show the impact of that change? Riley Rossmo is an enigma. His art can be frustratingly bad and great on the same page. Received an advance copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elle Markov

    This one was a very interesting read. I enjoyed volume 1 more, however, this one did not disappoint. Unlike volume 1 this story takes place in the modern day and Rasputin recounts his past to nosy reporter. The whole time I’m enjoying the story very much; then I got the end and I get a cliffhanger. I was all into the story and now I’m speculating if this reporter will squeal that there is a man that can bring the dead back. Rating 3.5 out of 5 [email protected]

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Objectively not that great but I'm heavily biased towards Russian folklore, and we're back to Snegurochka and Dad Moroz in vol 2 so I couldn't be happier with the storyline. Brb catching a rabbit to hide my soul in.

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