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The Hormone Myth: How Junk Science, Gender Politics, and Lies about PMS Keep Women Down

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It’s time for women to reject the “hormone myth” and own their emotions in a healthy and realistic way. This provocative book exposes pervasive myths about women’s hormones and shows how flawed, obsolete research and sexism have combined to keep women “in their place.” Although the idea that women become raving lunatics when their hormones fluctuate is firmly entrenched in It’s time for women to reject the “hormone myth” and own their emotions in a healthy and realistic way. This provocative book exposes pervasive myths about women’s hormones and shows how flawed, obsolete research and sexism have combined to keep women “in their place.” Although the idea that women become raving lunatics when their hormones fluctuate is firmly entrenched in American culture—images of hormone-crazed women are prominent on TV and in movies, books, and magazines—a thorough examination of the evidence overwhelmingly tells us otherwise. This book will confront the pervasive myth that women are at the mercy of their reproductive hormones, and illustrate how the perpetuation of this stereotype harms women. Scientific evidence shows that the majority of women do not experience major mental or physical symptoms linked to their hormones. Rather, much of women’s supposed “irrationality” can be attributed to environmental factors and the cultural and social realities of being a woman in the Western world. With a thorough exploration of women’s hormonal lives, from the initiation of menstruation through menopause, The Hormone Myth will help you reject the negative stereotype of the hormone-crazed woman and gain an appreciation for the natural changes that occur over time.


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It’s time for women to reject the “hormone myth” and own their emotions in a healthy and realistic way. This provocative book exposes pervasive myths about women’s hormones and shows how flawed, obsolete research and sexism have combined to keep women “in their place.” Although the idea that women become raving lunatics when their hormones fluctuate is firmly entrenched in It’s time for women to reject the “hormone myth” and own their emotions in a healthy and realistic way. This provocative book exposes pervasive myths about women’s hormones and shows how flawed, obsolete research and sexism have combined to keep women “in their place.” Although the idea that women become raving lunatics when their hormones fluctuate is firmly entrenched in American culture—images of hormone-crazed women are prominent on TV and in movies, books, and magazines—a thorough examination of the evidence overwhelmingly tells us otherwise. This book will confront the pervasive myth that women are at the mercy of their reproductive hormones, and illustrate how the perpetuation of this stereotype harms women. Scientific evidence shows that the majority of women do not experience major mental or physical symptoms linked to their hormones. Rather, much of women’s supposed “irrationality” can be attributed to environmental factors and the cultural and social realities of being a woman in the Western world. With a thorough exploration of women’s hormonal lives, from the initiation of menstruation through menopause, The Hormone Myth will help you reject the negative stereotype of the hormone-crazed woman and gain an appreciation for the natural changes that occur over time.

30 review for The Hormone Myth: How Junk Science, Gender Politics, and Lies about PMS Keep Women Down

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maria Beltrami

    Da sempre, e sempre più spesso, ogni volta che noi donne diamo fiato alle nostre frustrazioni, ci sentiamo chiedere se abbiamo le mestruazioni, o, se appena appena più vecchie, se stiamo andando in menopausa. E ancora oggi, come una volta, si sente dire che una donna non è adatta a lavori di responsabilità perché una volta al mese diventa matta. Ebbene, io non mi sono mai sentita matta e ho sempre cercato (e ottenuto, perché ho quello che si chiama un carattere di merda e non mi faccio mettere s Da sempre, e sempre più spesso, ogni volta che noi donne diamo fiato alle nostre frustrazioni, ci sentiamo chiedere se abbiamo le mestruazioni, o, se appena appena più vecchie, se stiamo andando in menopausa. E ancora oggi, come una volta, si sente dire che una donna non è adatta a lavori di responsabilità perché una volta al mese diventa matta. Ebbene, io non mi sono mai sentita matta e ho sempre cercato (e ottenuto, perché ho quello che si chiama un carattere di merda e non mi faccio mettere sotto facilmente) ruoli di responsabilità. Forse perché, essendo un chimico di formazione, alla balla non ho mai creduto? Eppure tante donne e tanti uomini sì, e sembra che il loro numero stia crescendo. In parole semplici e chiare, Robyn Stein DeLuca smaschera il mito degli ormoni e lo fa a pezzi usando quella che è la più semplice tecnica di indagine: cerca i soldi. E sulla salute delle donne tanti soldi sono stati guadagnati. Da leggere, assolutamente. Ringrazio New Harbinger Publications, Inc. e Netgalley per avermi fornito una copia gratuita in cambio di una recensione onesta. All along, and ever more often, every time we women breathe our frustrations, we feel asked whether we have menstruation, or, if just slightly older, whether we are going to menopause. And still today, as in the past, we hear that a woman is not suitable for jobs of responsibility because once a month she becomes crazy. Well, I have never felt crazy and I've always looked for (and gotten, because I have what is called a shit personality and don't get me put under easily) roles of responsibility. Perhaps the reason is, as a trained chemist, have I never believed in lie? Yet belive it so many women and so many men, and it seems that their numbers are growing. In simple and clear words, Robyn Stein DeLuca unmasks the hormone myth and breaks it apart using what is the simplest technique of investigation: looking for money. And on women's health, a lot of money has been earned. To read, absolutely. I thank New Harbinger Publications, Inc. and Netgalley for providing me with a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dolores Bilges

    Every woman has experienced the frustration of having her concerns, feelings, emotions, and stress-related reactions dismissed and attributed to “that time of the month” or “that stage of life” as a way to delegitimize these experiences. In her book, The Hormone Myth, Dr. Robyn Stein Deluca illustrates the numerous ways the alleged issue of hormones has been used as a tool to subjugate woman and limit the amount of power and control they attain in society. As Deluca points out, the effect of the Every woman has experienced the frustration of having her concerns, feelings, emotions, and stress-related reactions dismissed and attributed to “that time of the month” or “that stage of life” as a way to delegitimize these experiences. In her book, The Hormone Myth, Dr. Robyn Stein Deluca illustrates the numerous ways the alleged issue of hormones has been used as a tool to subjugate woman and limit the amount of power and control they attain in society. As Deluca points out, the effect of the hormone myth begins early in the lives of most females when the myth is propagated by older females who, having heard it their entire lives, believe it to be true and pass that belief along to their daughters, continuing the cycle. Add to this the exploitation of the myth by media, whether it be numerous articles about menstruation, PMS, menopause, etc., irrational characters in television and film, or interviews with supposed “experts” in news programming, and it is easy to see how this myth has become so ingrained in our attitudes and thought processes regarding women. The Hormone Myth examines all of these influences, illustrating the role each plays in perpetuating the myth and the disservice done to women by forcing them to live under its shadow. Additionally, The Hormone Myth examines the less than reputable research that has reinforced the myth, then offers advice on how to evaluate information that is presented, and to analyze the impetus behind the research. Hint: follow the money! The Hormone Myth is written in clear, layman’s terms, and is a must read for every woman, whether you have bought into, or fought against, the myth influencing your life. It raises important issues that should be addressed and serves as an eye-opening expose into the negative effect the myth has not only on women throughout their lives, but also the effect on males in their relation to women. Through illustrations, examples, and an examination of the research, The Hormone Myth makes a compelling argument for putting this widely accepted myth to rest.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bekah

    Full Review and Synopsis on Books Cats Tea Occasionally, I feel that Dr. Deluca conflates the PMS issue with feminist or gender roles, but the points she makes as a whole are still relevant (and interrelated). The Hormone Myth gets tedious and a bit more off the main topic after chapter 4 and doesn't pick back up until chapter 11. The book stops being about PMS and becomes a sidetrack for pregnancy and menopause. Granted, those are other times of changing, but also not as devastatingly so as popu Full Review and Synopsis on Books Cats Tea Occasionally, I feel that Dr. Deluca conflates the PMS issue with feminist or gender roles, but the points she makes as a whole are still relevant (and interrelated). The Hormone Myth gets tedious and a bit more off the main topic after chapter 4 and doesn't pick back up until chapter 11. The book stops being about PMS and becomes a sidetrack for pregnancy and menopause. Granted, those are other times of changing, but also not as devastatingly so as popular media and opinions would have you think, and so it feels like a switch away from the main discussion which picks back up a little awkwardly later on. I honestly started to skim and then skip through those sections because they were just repetitions of the same things she talked about previously. In Dr. Deluca's path to dismissing the notion of PMS as a mental disorder, she occasionally broad brushes other issues to try and make her point which causes her to dismiss other illnesses. "Recent years have brought us official diagnoses for restless leg syndrome and social anxiety disorder--conditions previously thought of as within the normal range of the human condition. Yes, some people may find relief from debilitating conditions, but by making them official disorders the door opens to more income from doctor visits and prescription medication" (p 184-185). My issue with this is that without those official disorders, people who do suffer from debilitating or disruptive conditions don't have validation of their disorders and, therefore, can not, do not, and/or will not seek medical help, let alone have their medical insurance (if they are privileged to have any) cover it or their medications in some way. I feel that she has a condescension to medical help outside of the book's purpose and it left a sour taste in my mouth. I like at the end how she sets out what exactly hormones are, which ones are related to reproductivity and what they actually do, how to read professional/journal articles, and how to spot bias, sensational, or misleading information. I also liked that she emphasized not only for mothers to educate their daughters with factual information and their experiences, but to do the same for their sons. Males can't know exactly what females go through, but by educating them, we demystify femininity and the other half of our population in their eyes. All in all, I thought that The Hormone Myth had a very good and strong start, a relevant, but often off topic middle, and a nice tying together at the end. I would recommend this book, especially the beginning, to females and males alike because it puts a great perspective and understanding on how PMS has been created, treated, and used to make women creatures to be handled.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Vishakha ~ ReadingSpren ~

    Everyone needs to read this book. It should literally be in the school curriculum for kids across the globe. DeLuca is on a mission - a mission to demystify the inner workings of a woman's body. And if you think that you already know alot about it (just like I did) then most of you would be happy (or not) to know that you probably don't know shit about female anatomy and periods and all the other feminine juju. Hell, I didn't know shit and I am confident that I was fairly more knowledgeable tha Everyone needs to read this book. It should literally be in the school curriculum for kids across the globe. DeLuca is on a mission - a mission to demystify the inner workings of a woman's body. And if you think that you already know alot about it (just like I did) then most of you would be happy (or not) to know that you probably don't know shit about female anatomy and periods and all the other feminine juju. Hell, I didn't know shit and I am confident that I was fairly more knowledgeable than the average non-medical population. DeLuca systematically explains the scientific reality of each major milestone in a woman's reproductive lifecycle, aka: - Periods and PMS - Pregnancy and postpartum depression - Menopause She then gives us a culture lesson on how these phases are misrepresented in the media, how said misrepresentation gave rise to the myth which has been continually used to suppress women, disregard their opinions and keep power out of their hands. And how propagating and upholding this myth has profited the pharmaceutical and medical industries in multi-billion figures in the last few decades. And finally, she tells us who is the victim of this myth. All of us. Men, women, children, everyone. DeLuca is very unangry and objective in her delivery and opinions. I don't mind angry feminists myself. but I know a lot of people do mind them. I just want to put this out there so no potential reader would miss out on this very important book. She makes sure to point out that though women do get the harder bargain when it comes to sexism compared to men, in the end even men hurt. Unreasonable standards of masculinity and femininity have put shackles on both genders and prevented them to fully realize their individual potential. Its a short, quick read and pack-full of eye-opening revelations about how deep-rooted the problem of sexism is in the hormone myth. I cannot recommend this strongly enough.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    I'm conflicted about this book. My gripe is with the execution (the editing), not with the content. Well, not with all of the content. Content such as this deserve rock solid air tight logic. And there are some solid ideas, examples and arguments but the author loses me as I often felt her anger and resentment come through in her writing, in addition to feeling like I was being preached to, patronized, and criticized. I found several points to be particularly annoying, here is one: Chapter 5, pag I'm conflicted about this book. My gripe is with the execution (the editing), not with the content. Well, not with all of the content. Content such as this deserve rock solid air tight logic. And there are some solid ideas, examples and arguments but the author loses me as I often felt her anger and resentment come through in her writing, in addition to feeling like I was being preached to, patronized, and criticized. I found several points to be particularly annoying, here is one: Chapter 5, page 73, paragraph 2: "Yet only 9 percent of American women get their prenatal and delivery care from a midwife. 28 Why not more? Because the power of the hormone myth maintains the imperative that all reproductive events need to be exhaustively managed. If a woman doesn't utilize the medical system at its highest level, the myth says she is irresponsible - despite some very convincing science that tells us otherwise." Well, from what information is she basing that conclusion? I checked the reference to 28 and that is from the National Vital Statistics report from 2013. Unless they, or DeLuca, interviewed a good 1,000 of the women who gave birth in hospitals, how would she be able to know why women didn't choose midwifery? Not from the National Vital Statistics report. There are at least a half-dozen factors that come to mind immediately for why women don't choose midwifery that have nothing to do with the myth. But yet, my conflict! As there are many points in the book that we should be aware of and talking about. For instance, us women ceasing to view, or allow anyone else to view, our emotional state as a potential MENTAL DISORDER! Also, understanding postpartum emotions - chapter 6 with a section on Andrea Yates; chapter 7 outlining the three stages of postpartum blues, depression and psychosis was brilliant - how to spot junk science, questioning the physicians we rely on to help us manage our health, and for crying out loud women, stop calling yourself a bitch (this does not aid in dispelling any myths.) One last gripe, in the Conclusion section, page 169, paragraph 3: "Here's a sample scenario. You come home from work and the house is a wreck for the umpteenth time. Neither your kids nor husband have done any cleaning, even though you left them a to-do list. You show your anger by saying something like: 'Would it be so hard to clean up the toys? Do I have to come home to a destroyed house everyday?' From his place in front of the television, your husband says, 'What's the matter with you, are you on the rag?' The menstruation accusation has been thrown. But you know your anger is justified - and that it has nothing to do with your time of the month. How to proceed from here?" I just just couldn't believe I read that! DeLuca talks about us (as a culture) ceasing to force our kids into gender roles and then turns around and uses that example of a 50's style man in "his place in front of the television" to drive home a point about women not being bitchy? That example has nothing to do with the hormone myth - or dispelling it! That is flat out DISRESPECT! I, for one, would never be with a man who thinks its okay to talk to people that way. Put this way, he'd only say it once. If my kids didn't do their chores? Well, they certainly wouldn't get past my husband and if they did by some odd chance, I wouldn't use sarcasm to compel them to comply. I would TELL them to do their chores immediately and then they'd be grounded for not doing them in the first place. So, read the book but know you'll have to mine it's pages for the gold that it contains.

  6. 5 out of 5

    M.

    Mostly a good book, and it also emphasized educating boys / men on what women go through when menstruation happens, but I can't help but disagree with some of the more "feminist" points as downplaying post abortive trauma, although she doesn't do it entirely. Mostly a good book, and it also emphasized educating boys / men on what women go through when menstruation happens, but I can't help but disagree with some of the more "feminist" points as downplaying post abortive trauma, although she doesn't do it entirely.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    An excellent easy-to-read critique of what so many think they know about hormones and female behavior. DeLuca cites the bad science and cultural idiocies that make us desperately want to believe Women Are Controlled By Hormones And Men Aren’t, how those work to the detriment and benefit of both men and women, and gently, oh so gently, offers good science and the suggestion that women’s anger at many things may be justified, not the result of something in her body but something in her world. She An excellent easy-to-read critique of what so many think they know about hormones and female behavior. DeLuca cites the bad science and cultural idiocies that make us desperately want to believe Women Are Controlled By Hormones And Men Aren’t, how those work to the detriment and benefit of both men and women, and gently, oh so gently, offers good science and the suggestion that women’s anger at many things may be justified, not the result of something in her body but something in her world. She doesn’t ignore women’s feelings about the effect hormones have on themselves, but does a good job of offering statistics on actual likelihood of symptoms and reasons it might be easier to believe in a hormone myth than to believe in a sexist world. This is a very simple book, though, decidedly for a popular audience, and I’m not sure that without more depth and specific refutation of specific studies it would convince anyone who wasn’t already attuned to the inaccuracy of our popular hormone myth. Edited to add: BBC news has a report today on how “baby brain is real” and insists that a new study backs up a previous one. I’ll believe it when I read the study if it manages to suss out “people are less good at cognitive tasks when they have a lot to plan for, organize, and do, a vast deal of emotional labor to accomplish as well, without much societal support besides pats on the head” from “no really there’s a medical reason this time.” Someone should do a study of “househunting brain” or “planning a vacation brain” or “exhausted, out of money, with the flu, and it’s the holidays brain.” Must be harder to get funding for something that wouldn’t be solely a chick problem and wouldn’t reinforce a cultural myth.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Desiré R

    I really enjoyed learning more about the ways my body works, and I related to the author's righteous anger through her recounting the many horrific ways women are manipulated even by the professionals we trust our wellbeing to. It was very comprehensive of the three major stages some cis women go through their lives -menstruation, pregnancy/birth and menopause- and I liked learning about all three even if I'm not thinking of going through the second stage myself. I have to say some chapters felt I really enjoyed learning more about the ways my body works, and I related to the author's righteous anger through her recounting the many horrific ways women are manipulated even by the professionals we trust our wellbeing to. It was very comprehensive of the three major stages some cis women go through their lives -menstruation, pregnancy/birth and menopause- and I liked learning about all three even if I'm not thinking of going through the second stage myself. I have to say some chapters felt quite a bit repetitive, though. Also, although I know we're all still learning and hopefully changing our ways of thinking and expressing ourselves, and I know the author acknowledges by the end that gender is not a binary, I think it would have been worth mentioning that trans men and women and non-binary people are also affected by the hormone myth.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Maya Arellanes

    Super interesting and easy to read. It helped me to understand and question things that I had not previously thought about—showing me how ingrained the hormone myth is in women as rest as the rest of society. I learned a lot from this book and have applied it personally to my life. I always *expected* that I would be PMSing the week before my period. Because that’s what happens, we turn into bitches right? Wrong—for most women. After I had this attitude shift I’ve started thinking differently ab Super interesting and easy to read. It helped me to understand and question things that I had not previously thought about—showing me how ingrained the hormone myth is in women as rest as the rest of society. I learned a lot from this book and have applied it personally to my life. I always *expected* that I would be PMSing the week before my period. Because that’s what happens, we turn into bitches right? Wrong—for most women. After I had this attitude shift I’ve started thinking differently about myself and have tried to stop attributing my frustrations or anger simply to PMS.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This is pretty good. It explains that we all have ideas about women's hormones that are not really true. Things like women's hormones can cause mental illness, pms is something that makes women irrational and they can't help it or that pregnancy should be treated as an illness. Lots of feelings and behavior are blamed on hormones. It explains what the function of hormones really is. It is an interesting book. This is pretty good. It explains that we all have ideas about women's hormones that are not really true. Things like women's hormones can cause mental illness, pms is something that makes women irrational and they can't help it or that pregnancy should be treated as an illness. Lots of feelings and behavior are blamed on hormones. It explains what the function of hormones really is. It is an interesting book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    While repetitive at times, there were also some seriously eye opening sections, detailing the history of the ways womens bodies have been used against them. A good read for every woman, and an excellent section at the end talking about how to critically evaluate the science that is presented to us.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tera

    I recieved this book via a Goodreads contest. I found this both interesting as well as eye opening. I hadn't realized how much I had bought into a general mythos rather then relying on facts and research. Well written, informative and though provoking. A must read for all females and wouldn't hurt for the guys either. I recieved this book via a Goodreads contest. I found this both interesting as well as eye opening. I hadn't realized how much I had bought into a general mythos rather then relying on facts and research. Well written, informative and though provoking. A must read for all females and wouldn't hurt for the guys either.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Frances

    This book is the uncovering of the ways that society uses biological processes to disrespect women's voices throughout their lives. It is a good read and perhaps if the word really gets out then we can have rational discussions about the place of women in our culture and our world. This book is the uncovering of the ways that society uses biological processes to disrespect women's voices throughout their lives. It is a good read and perhaps if the word really gets out then we can have rational discussions about the place of women in our culture and our world.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nancie Lafferty

    I received this book as a Giveaway. Thank you. Stereotypes, junk science and gender politics are ever present and will never disappear. This book reviews many ideas that still prevail in our changing times and beg to be noticed, including the idea that a dose of "hormones" will "fix" everything. I received this book as a Giveaway. Thank you. Stereotypes, junk science and gender politics are ever present and will never disappear. This book reviews many ideas that still prevail in our changing times and beg to be noticed, including the idea that a dose of "hormones" will "fix" everything.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ksenia

    Very educational and worth reading, though the author has repeated her arguments several times.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Wonderful! Eye-opening as far as how our current thoughts on PMS, childbirth and menopause are based on ancient, flawed research and how this affects women in society.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Isabel

    very informative. full of things that everyone should be aware of. a little too repetitive for me, but some people need to points to be driven home in such a way. perfect for the average person!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Booth

    This book was awesome. So many myths debunked. I loved it. Would like it for my personal collection.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Spiro Condos

    Fascinating. Opened my eyes to the reality of women's capabilities. A feminist book that should bring men and women closer together. Fascinating. Opened my eyes to the reality of women's capabilities. A feminist book that should bring men and women closer together.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lydia

    Research and statistics inspired essential reading on how misinformation and lies impact women's experiences through menstruation, pregnancy, postpartum depression, and menopause. Research and statistics inspired essential reading on how misinformation and lies impact women's experiences through menstruation, pregnancy, postpartum depression, and menopause.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I agree with the premise, and found the research to be compelling. Perhaps because I didn't need convincing, the tone seemed a bit over the top. Overall worth reading. I agree with the premise, and found the research to be compelling. Perhaps because I didn't need convincing, the tone seemed a bit over the top. Overall worth reading.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nat

    Great book that shows how even the self aware women can still believe in these outdated notions and how this harms women everywehre

  23. 4 out of 5

    Beth Everett

    I was lucky enough to get an advanced copy of this excellent book! In clear accessible language Ms DeLuca exposes the ways women are kept down by the myths surrounding PMS, Pregnancy and Menopause. Excellent science coupled with interesting anecdotes makes for great reading. And check out the chapter in the appendix on how to spot junk science!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shaleah

    For how much I had to skim for preaching and circular writing, this was okay. I was more interested in what the hormone myth was and what were lies about PMS. I actually had to go back and reread the first chapter because I couldn't remember what the myth WAS (view spoiler)[ Women's hormones make them crazy. (hide spoiler)] after all the ranting. This actually makes me want to go to the doctor because according to the science reported here, only 3 to 8 percent actually have PMDD. If not diagnosed For how much I had to skim for preaching and circular writing, this was okay. I was more interested in what the hormone myth was and what were lies about PMS. I actually had to go back and reread the first chapter because I couldn't remember what the myth WAS (view spoiler)[ Women's hormones make them crazy. (hide spoiler)] after all the ranting. This actually makes me want to go to the doctor because according to the science reported here, only 3 to 8 percent actually have PMDD. If not diagnosed by a doctor, my PMS is most likely the result of a negative attitude about how my body works... I like the points about cultivating a positive body image (including menstruation), how most negative emotions shouldn't be blamed on hormones, and how the excuse of PMS allows bad behavior (maybe that woman is impatient, easily upset, or irritable but not because of PMS). It is also true that blaming PMS is widespread and a subject for jokes(I will still laugh at most). However, if 92 to 97 % of American women truly aren't affected by PMDD, then my friends, associates, and I must be in the small percentage of those that experience physical and emotional changes that are severe enough to disrupt our lives. There are a few sentences to acknowledge that a small amount of women do, but it was so light as to be easily dismissed. I would recommend a few chapters, but especially the conclusion. Are women hormonal maniacs? NO "The truth is that menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause, in and of themselves, do not harm women's mental health in any meaningful way..." Do I believe that? Not for all women. Oh yeah, lots of pages on pregnancy.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bana Shehadeh

    A must read book/research study!!! Makes you re-look the whole PMSing thing. When a girl becomes "woman" the hormone myth begins, with all these stereotypes and sociological theories that start to show, adding to them all kind of devastating messages we`ve been raised on our entire life. This book smash all this misconseption and start from the zero with how to re-look the life most women are living with as a normal one and that PMSing is not the reason for "all world issues" ! A must read book/research study!!! Makes you re-look the whole PMSing thing. When a girl becomes "woman" the hormone myth begins, with all these stereotypes and sociological theories that start to show, adding to them all kind of devastating messages we`ve been raised on our entire life. This book smash all this misconseption and start from the zero with how to re-look the life most women are living with as a normal one and that PMSing is not the reason for "all world issues" !

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vicky

    I love how the author turns the hormone myth on its head. I believe most of the problems have to do with the way social relationships under capitalism.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sue

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

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