counter create hit Terminated for Reasons of Taste: Other Ways to Hear Essential and Inessential Music - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Terminated for Reasons of Taste: Other Ways to Hear Essential and Inessential Music

Availability: Ready to download

In Terminated for Reasons of Taste, veteran rock critic Chuck Eddy writes that "rock'n'roll history is written by the winners. Which stinks, because the losers have always played a big role in keeping rock interesting." Rock's losers share top billing with its winners in this new collection of Eddy's writing. In pieces culled from outlets as varied as the Village Voice, In Terminated for Reasons of Taste, veteran rock critic Chuck Eddy writes that "rock'n'roll history is written by the winners. Which stinks, because the losers have always played a big role in keeping rock interesting." Rock's losers share top billing with its winners in this new collection of Eddy's writing. In pieces culled from outlets as varied as the Village Voice, Creem magazine, the streaming site Rhapsody, music message boards, and his high school newspaper, Eddy covers everything from the Beastie Boys to 1920s country music, Taylor Swift to German new wave, Bruce Springsteen to occult metal. With an encyclopedic knowledge, unabashed irreverence, and a captivating style, Eddy rips up popular music histories and stitches them back together using his appreciation of the lost, ignored, and maligned. In so doing, he shows how pop music is bigger, and more multidimensional and compelling than most people can imagine.


Compare
Ads Banner

In Terminated for Reasons of Taste, veteran rock critic Chuck Eddy writes that "rock'n'roll history is written by the winners. Which stinks, because the losers have always played a big role in keeping rock interesting." Rock's losers share top billing with its winners in this new collection of Eddy's writing. In pieces culled from outlets as varied as the Village Voice, In Terminated for Reasons of Taste, veteran rock critic Chuck Eddy writes that "rock'n'roll history is written by the winners. Which stinks, because the losers have always played a big role in keeping rock interesting." Rock's losers share top billing with its winners in this new collection of Eddy's writing. In pieces culled from outlets as varied as the Village Voice, Creem magazine, the streaming site Rhapsody, music message boards, and his high school newspaper, Eddy covers everything from the Beastie Boys to 1920s country music, Taylor Swift to German new wave, Bruce Springsteen to occult metal. With an encyclopedic knowledge, unabashed irreverence, and a captivating style, Eddy rips up popular music histories and stitches them back together using his appreciation of the lost, ignored, and maligned. In so doing, he shows how pop music is bigger, and more multidimensional and compelling than most people can imagine.

45 review for Terminated for Reasons of Taste: Other Ways to Hear Essential and Inessential Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Eddy has long been one of the most readable of music writers, and one who has probably been as misunderstood as any other by those who think music criticism is supposed to function merely as a guidance for potential buyers as to which new record is most worth hard-earned money. Of course, nowadays, all music consumers are supposed to be as broad-minded as critics, since the internet makes entire music histories easily available at a drop of a YouTube video or Spotify playlist. (Though every day Eddy has long been one of the most readable of music writers, and one who has probably been as misunderstood as any other by those who think music criticism is supposed to function merely as a guidance for potential buyers as to which new record is most worth hard-earned money. Of course, nowadays, all music consumers are supposed to be as broad-minded as critics, since the internet makes entire music histories easily available at a drop of a YouTube video or Spotify playlist. (Though every day I grade used records for the Euclid Records website that are simply not sitting there for my perusal on any online service; history is being randomly recovered, it seems.) But, anyway, music critics are supposed to make us think about music, both the stuff in the subject of a given article or book, and the rest of the stuff we encounter outside of the piece in question. And Chuck Eddy consistently makes me think, because a) he's obviously truly passionate about what he writes about; b) he's hilarious, prone to jokes sometimes only funny to those of us who have devoted huge chunks of our lives to the details of music far beyond what most people who merely like a few records now and again, and sometimes just plain yuck-filled with or without getting the inside dope; c) he is positively an original stylist when it comes to making connections between songs most ordinary listeners would never put together if they were the only two or fourteen sitting on a jukebox; d) he has a knack for making me want to know way more than I do about music, even though I realize I'm in a pretty high percentile of those who listen to the stuff; and e) his prose crackles and snaps and delights in ways sometimes echoing the joys of the music itself. Oh, and f) he disagrees with me all the time, half-heartedly ripping into records and artists I have loved for decades or viciously tearing apart whole aesthetics which stick to my ribs automatically (I'm looking at you, Anti- Records soul revivalists, for one example). So, yeah, I'm trying to write this review in a pale imitation of his style, but there have always been little things in the voice of Chuck Eddy that have pushed me to be better at what I do, and that's a good reason to get his book. Though, to be fair to those consumers who want to know what they might think about it, this collection of assorted articles written over more than 3 decades (the second such omnibus he's put together) hangs together best if you're already familiar with the man's output, and/or if you have a high tolerance for reading about music you may never have encountered in your life and may never will.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Burgoo

    A somewhat haphazard collection of Eddy's various writings from around the internet. As always, interesting and provocative stuff (even if you don't like his taste). The more of a music nerd that you are, the more you will enjoy this book. http://fedpeaches.blogspot.com/2017/0...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    The biggest disappointment is the title. This is actually a collection music criticism articles by the author, none of which gives any kind of advice on how to find new and offbeat music (other than off-hand mentions of the author's habits of cruising record store bargin bins back in the day). The writing varied in quality throughout, but pretty consistently I did not enjoy the author's style. He employed a lot of much too long sentences. He also often created overly brudensome descripitve The biggest disappointment is the title. This is actually a collection music criticism articles by the author, none of which gives any kind of advice on how to find new and offbeat music (other than off-hand mentions of the author's habits of cruising record store bargin bins back in the day). The writing varied in quality throughout, but pretty consistently I did not enjoy the author's style. He employed a lot of much too long sentences. He also often created overly brudensome descripitve clauses and seemingly made up subgenre names. On the whole he displayed a vast breadth of knowledge about music, but he did little to make it accessible. There were a few interesting nuggets along the way, like the link between a style called talking blues used in early country music that is similar if not related to rap. The best parts were the chapter introductions. It seems like there could have been a very interesting book in all of this, but instead it is a loosely organized and not really coherent collection of pieces that is not greater than the sum of its parts.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Phil Overeem

    Chuck Eddy gives a shit about many bands about which little was given, and couldn't give a shit about many bands about which much was. He burrows under the canon (and undermines many of the assumptions of its foundations) and into your wallet, as you rush to Discogs to see what Urinals or Kix records will cost you. Most important, his best writing is blessed with a streak of compassion for imperfect strivers whose need to confirm their existence resulted in popular music well worth your time. If Chuck Eddy gives a shit about many bands about which little was given, and couldn't give a shit about many bands about which much was. He burrows under the canon (and undermines many of the assumptions of its foundations) and into your wallet, as you rush to Discogs to see what Urinals or Kix records will cost you. Most important, his best writing is blessed with a streak of compassion for imperfect strivers whose need to confirm their existence resulted in popular music well worth your time. If you've read his other three books, you need to know this is a literary mix-tape of his notable reviews he wrote anywhere he could find purchase (perhaps not the perfect word there, but fuck it). A worthy addition to the music reference section of your library. Oh yeah: he can also make you see bands you think you know (like Aerosmith) in a whole different way.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Evan

    I received an advance reading copy of this book, for free, through Goodreads First Reads program in exchange for my honest review. Terminated for Reasons of Taste: Other Ways to Hear Essential and Inessential Music is a collection of columns written by rock critic, Chuck Eddy. The stated premise is that rock n roll history is written by the winners, but that the losers deserve the credit for keeping rock interesting. The problem being that the bands which Eddy chose to identify and spotlight as I received an advance reading copy of this book, for free, through Goodreads First Reads program in exchange for my honest review. Terminated for Reasons of Taste: Other Ways to Hear Essential and Inessential Music is a collection of columns written by rock critic, Chuck Eddy. The stated premise is that “rock ‘n’ roll history is written by the winners”, but that the “losers” deserve the credit for “keeping rock interesting”. The problem being that the bands which Eddy chose to identify and spotlight as “losers” are not forgotten bands who were influential in some way, but instead they’re bands nobody (other than the band members’ immediate family and Eddy) have ever heard of. We’re not talking about has-beens; we’re talking never-weres. So obscure, at one point Eddy brags about owning a rap album, which was never released in the U.S. that he purchased in Frankfurt, Germany in 1983. Eddy obviously has an extensive music collection, and an encyclopedic knowledge of the topic, but… why would ANYONE be interested in him reviewing an album they’ve never heard (and never will hear) by a group they’ve never even heard of? This was the problem with the first third of the book. I really struggled to make it through the first 70 pages. Not only was the chosen topic uninteresting, but his columns seemed like a series of Joycean, stream of consciousness, incoherent, ramblings. For example, his review of the 1980 self-titled album by the band, 4 out of 5 Doctors (You remember them, right?) begins: “Washington D.C., dudes recording in Miami Beach, all with their shirts unbuttoned an extra button on the album’s back cover and ready to board the sailboat or go digging clams, they look really wholesome even if one guy’s shoes don’t match (and healthier still cooling out in their garage in the inner sleeve photo), but you never can tell.” Huh? Mercifully, things improve in the sections covering the decades of the 1980s and 1990s. These decades seem to have been the pinnacle of Eddy’s career. While writing for major publications, such as Creem and L.A. Weekly, he wrote about popular, mainstream bands such as The Beastie Boys, Aerosmith, and Motorhead. These entries each told a story (i.e. The Beasties appearance on Joan Rivers’ late night talk show, and Aerosmith in studio recording their Permanent Vacation album). The artists were interviewed, and the result being articles which were both entertaining and insightful. Not much I can say about the last two sections, which cover the ‘00s and ‘10s, other than it seemed overly long, and the topics were just plain random… Mexico-themed country music songs, German heavy metal, a comparison of Taylor Swift and Ke$ha, gospel music, bro-country, etc. Quick question: What happened to the whole “losers are the ones who make rock interesting” premise that was supposed to be the focal point the book? That hypothesis seems to have been left behind 200 pages ago. I am sure fans of Eddy will undoubtedly enjoy this latest collection of his columns. Personally, this was my introduction to Chuck Eddy and his writings. I found it to be hit-and-miss; with many more misses than hits. Highlights were few and far between, and his attempts at wit fell flat with me. At 314 pages, the book seemed about 275 pages too long. Caveat emptor.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    I won this book in a Goodreads First Reads giveaway. My husband has always said that I don't have a musical ear. Probably why I have struggled to read this book! No doubt this book may appeal to some who are fans of Chuck Eddy. I shall be passing this book on to a relative whom I feel will enjoy far more than myself.

  7. 5 out of 5

    J. Sot

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shari Gonzales

  9. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eric Jensen

  13. 4 out of 5

    Danny

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris Estey

  15. 5 out of 5

    Randall Pink Floyd

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cris

  17. 4 out of 5

    David

  18. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pat Mcgahon

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julia Conway

  21. 5 out of 5

    SALLY WHITE

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  24. 4 out of 5

    Betty

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Bradley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  27. 5 out of 5

    J Collins

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carol McFarlane

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

  31. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  32. 5 out of 5

    Shana M. Garrity

  33. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

  34. 5 out of 5

    Gwen

  35. 4 out of 5

    Pam

  36. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  37. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

  38. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  39. 4 out of 5

    Claire

  40. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  41. 5 out of 5

    Heather Williams

  42. 5 out of 5

    D

  43. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  44. 5 out of 5

    Angelia

  45. 4 out of 5

    Christine

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.