counter create hit The Twilight Children - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Twilight Children

Availability: Ready to download

When a white orb washes up on the shore of a remote Latin American village, a group of children poke at the strange object to see what it is. The orb explodes, leaving the children completely blind. And when a beautiful young woman who may be an alien is found wandering the seafront, she’s taken in by the townspeople, but soon becomes a person of interest to a pair of CIA When a white orb washes up on the shore of a remote Latin American village, a group of children poke at the strange object to see what it is. The orb explodes, leaving the children completely blind. And when a beautiful young woman who may be an alien is found wandering the seafront, she’s taken in by the townspeople, but soon becomes a person of interest to a pair of CIA agents, and the target of affection for a young scientist. Collecting: The Twilight Children 1-4


Compare
Ads Banner

When a white orb washes up on the shore of a remote Latin American village, a group of children poke at the strange object to see what it is. The orb explodes, leaving the children completely blind. And when a beautiful young woman who may be an alien is found wandering the seafront, she’s taken in by the townspeople, but soon becomes a person of interest to a pair of CIA When a white orb washes up on the shore of a remote Latin American village, a group of children poke at the strange object to see what it is. The orb explodes, leaving the children completely blind. And when a beautiful young woman who may be an alien is found wandering the seafront, she’s taken in by the townspeople, but soon becomes a person of interest to a pair of CIA agents, and the target of affection for a young scientist. Collecting: The Twilight Children 1-4

30 review for The Twilight Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    What the fuck even happened here? There was literally no coherent story. None. This was just gibberish and nonsense with gorgeous artwork! I don't even know what to say about this one... Look! Pretty pictures! Ok, to be fair, there was a story. But it never went anywhere sane. And the ending? The only reason to read this (if you aren't high) is to look at Darwyn Cooke's art. Seriously. If you really want to know what happens: (view spoiler)[Orbs show up, then disappear, then a woman shows up, then (m What the fuck even happened here? There was literally no coherent story. None. This was just gibberish and nonsense with gorgeous artwork! I don't even know what to say about this one... Look! Pretty pictures! Ok, to be fair, there was a story. But it never went anywhere sane. And the ending? The only reason to read this (if you aren't high) is to look at Darwyn Cooke's art. Seriously. If you really want to know what happens: (view spoiler)[Orbs show up, then disappear, then a woman shows up, then (maybe) FBI agents show up, a woman is cheating on her husband, then tries to cheat more, then the husband and boyfriend (sorta) team up to kill the new scientist guy she's cheating with, and maybe some of these people are aliens, and some kids go blind, then they can see, then they are blind, there is an old man on the beach who (maybe) saw something years ago but his family is dead so he's just nutty now, and the sheriff wanders around the town, and then the woman who showed up goes to the beach and stares at the orb, and then the orb blows up, and some of the people (maybe aliens?) disappear, and the cheating woman settles down with the sheriff. (hide spoiler)] Yeah.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Disappointing. Cook's art is good, but the story itself is just too poorly defined for me. In the end, stuff happens because reasons, and it takes a lot more than a standard promiscuous young wife in a small town story to interest me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    I got sucked into this book by Darwyn Cooke's artwork, which is absolutely fantastic here and nothing like anything he's done before. Once I started actually reading the story, though, that got its hooks into me too. Gilbert Hernández took me from a raised eyebrow of intrigue, to breathtaking moments of astonishment, to a burning desire to know what the story is behind these supernatural events... ... and then, ultimately, to a deflated sense of disappointment accompanied by a side order of what t I got sucked into this book by Darwyn Cooke's artwork, which is absolutely fantastic here and nothing like anything he's done before. Once I started actually reading the story, though, that got its hooks into me too. Gilbert Hernández took me from a raised eyebrow of intrigue, to breathtaking moments of astonishment, to a burning desire to know what the story is behind these supernatural events... ... and then, ultimately, to a deflated sense of disappointment accompanied by a side order of what the fuck-? I'm sad to say there is no satisfying conclusion... No mysteries laid bare... No friggin' answers at all, in fact! I thought 'that can't be it, surely' and searched online for news of a second volume... but, frustratingly, all I could find was an interview where Hernández confirms that these four issues are it; all there is and all there will be. This book was like mind-blowing foreplay followed by the worst case of blue balls... Perhaps this is typical for Hernández and that, if I'd read more of his work, I would have known what to expect. Maybe I'm just too stupid to 'get' what he's trying to say. I don't know. If anybody reading this could explain it to me, I'd be genuinely grateful. Anyway, as much as I enjoyed this book, I can't give it more than three stars due to the lack of a satisfying ending.

  4. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    A collaboration between Gilbert Hernandez (Palomar), who wrote the story, the recently departed Darwyn Cooke (Parker), who does the drawing and lettering and Dave Stewart, who does the colors. Supergroup comic? One might think so. The art, the feel of it is terrific, but the story by Beto is sort of like his pulpy B movie stuff: Bizarre. Orbs appear and disappear without explanation in a Latin American seaside village, blinds some children. An ethereal woman wanders in and out. A local woman sle A collaboration between Gilbert Hernandez (Palomar), who wrote the story, the recently departed Darwyn Cooke (Parker), who does the drawing and lettering and Dave Stewart, who does the colors. Supergroup comic? One might think so. The art, the feel of it is terrific, but the story by Beto is sort of like his pulpy B movie stuff: Bizarre. Orbs appear and disappear without explanation in a Latin American seaside village, blinds some children. An ethereal woman wanders in and out. A local woman sleeps with every available hot male in town, for no apparent reason, though it seems like she has femme fatale origins. Two CIA agents appear, masked as tourists. I have no idea what the hell is going on, and was hoping for some indication of a second volume that might explain it all, but no, these four issues is it, finito, kaput! The lettering and title would seem to indicate the team's nod to Rod Serling's Twilight Zone series that I watched with an almost religious fervor in the sixties. Aliens? The supernatural? Mystery? I'm good with that. It may in fact be more about mystery than coherence, finally, but I do not recommend this book to scratch your supernatural itch, however.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A scenic Latin fishing village’s peaceful existence is disturbed when giant white orbs begin appearing. Children go blind, people go missing, and a mysterious blonde woman called Ela appears - what does it all mean? The Twilight Children was one of the few Vertigo titles in recent years to catch my eye because it has two creators whose work I’ve really enjoyed in the past: Gilbert Hernandez (Love and Rockets) and Darwyn Cooke (Parker). But while this isn’t a bad comic, it’s also not a wholly sat A scenic Latin fishing village’s peaceful existence is disturbed when giant white orbs begin appearing. Children go blind, people go missing, and a mysterious blonde woman called Ela appears - what does it all mean? The Twilight Children was one of the few Vertigo titles in recent years to catch my eye because it has two creators whose work I’ve really enjoyed in the past: Gilbert Hernandez (Love and Rockets) and Darwyn Cooke (Parker). But while this isn’t a bad comic, it’s also not a wholly satisfying one because the story is so impossible to understand! I’ve been reading Beto’s comics for years and his script for The Twilight Children instantly has the familiar flavour of his Palomar books: Latin village, promiscuous lady, world-weary sheriff, sad old man, mischievous kids, and plenty of magical realism. The difference is that Cooke’s drawing his story this time around and instantly rejuvenates that world with his beautiful style and Dave Stewart’s lush colours. The artwork is absolutely wonderful throughout. The many little storylines are mildly amusing: the soap opera-esque drama of Tito and the various men she’s fooling around with, the sad life of town drunk Bundo and his secret history, the mysterious Ela, and of course the orbs (which are basically just Rover from The Prisoner). None of it really goes anywhere though. What are the orbs and why are they sometimes blinding people and sometimes teleporting them away? Who’s Ela and what connection does she have with the orbs? Why is she and the Orbs here in this particular place and time? We never find out and it’s maddening! Maybe the orbs are the Judeo-Christian God? Ela is the Orb’s daughter sent to Earth to save us (which she does at the end); the blindness and the curing of them are “miracles”; being transported into a realm of light could be “heaven”; Bundo could be seen as a prophet. Perhaps a similar story to the one that happened in this book took place a couple thousand years ago in a less sophisticated time and so Christianity was born? That’s just me thinking out loud though, the whole thing could simply be mystery for mystery’s sake or a homage to shows like The Twilight Zone and The Prisoner. I did like how when the obvious (but kinda funny in a Thomson and Thompson way) pair of CIA agents showed up pretending to be American tourists, everyone knew they were secret agents here to capture and study Ela/the Orbs. This is a world where the people have seen E.T. and The X-Files and can recognise shady government types, unlike people in other similar stories, which is refreshing to see. The Twilight Children is an interesting sci-fi mystery comic that never bored me but never rose above its premise to really impress me with anything else either. It’s definitely worth a look if you’re a fan of these creators or this genre but be prepared for a very underwhelming finale. Points for still trying for originality, Vertigo!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    I have absolutely no feelings about this book after finishing it. It is kind of dull and pointless, honestly. I have no idea what the plot was about or what it symbolises, I didn't like or care about the characters or their relationships, and I wasn't grabbed by the "mystery" (there really was no mystery). Some weird sphere shows up in the ocean. Then the kids are blind, then they're not, then blind again, then not. There is a strange girl walking around town and all the dudes fall for her. That I have absolutely no feelings about this book after finishing it. It is kind of dull and pointless, honestly. I have no idea what the plot was about or what it symbolises, I didn't like or care about the characters or their relationships, and I wasn't grabbed by the "mystery" (there really was no mystery). Some weird sphere shows up in the ocean. Then the kids are blind, then they're not, then blind again, then not. There is a strange girl walking around town and all the dudes fall for her. That other girl shags that one guy, wants to shag a different one, yet she's married to a third one, but she ends up with a fourth one (the female characters are especially bad and stereotypical, although dudes are very one-dimensional, too). But seriously, there is not much of a plot to this book aside from that. It looks really good, though. Darwyn Cooke sure can draw. His cartoonish yet cinematographic style adds a lot of atmosphere to the world of Twilight Children, at least partially making up for the lack of a good story. I still wouldn't recommend it, though. It's not like I hated the book, but in the end, I really don't know what to make of it. What did the authors try to say? What was all this about? I guess I will never know.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brian Poole

    The Twilight Children unites three of the biggest names in the comic book world for a mysterious modern fable. At the outset of The Twilight Children, a small, working class, seaside village deals with an unusual phenomenon: unexplained globes of shimmering energy keep popping up around town. The globes draw both scientists and government agents, while shaking up the lives of the locals. Three children are blinded by a globe. At the same time, Ela, a mysterious young woman apparently connected to The Twilight Children unites three of the biggest names in the comic book world for a mysterious modern fable. At the outset of The Twilight Children, a small, working class, seaside village deals with an unusual phenomenon: unexplained globes of shimmering energy keep popping up around town. The globes draw both scientists and government agents, while shaking up the lives of the locals. Three children are blinded by a globe. At the same time, Ela, a mysterious young woman apparently connected to the phenomenon, suddenly appears in town and further stirs up the locals. Ela precipitates a final confrontation with the power behind the globes, leaving the town very changed. The biggest selling point of The Twilight Children is the collaboration of writer Gabriel Hernandez (Love and Rockets), artist Darwyn Cooke (DC: The New Frontier)and colorist Dave Stewart (Sandman). The trio has been involved in some of the most celebrated comics of the past couple decades, helping to push the medium in new directions. Hernandez never quite explains the nature of the globes. That ambiguity turns out not to be a problem. The Twilight Children is more interested in how the events affect the lives of its central characters. The varying reactions to the odd phenomenon and how it transforms the characters is more important than providing a detailed exposition of its origins. Hernandez has a gift for depicting the lives of regular people in a way that’s dramatically compelling without being overly melodramatic, and then contrasting that relative normalcy against something fantastic. The writing is often subtle and Hernandez is more interested in mood and character beats than plot machinations. Even if he skips a detailed explanation, Hernandez nails his goal of showing how the extraordinary can transform lives. Cooke wouldn’t necessarily be the first artist one might pair with Hernandez. His highly stylized, cartoon-influenced approach wouldn’t seem simpatico with the writer’s grittier milieu. And yet that contrast is a strong part of the appeal of The Twilight Children. Cooke’s quirky, wide-eyed style crafts just the right atmosphere for the plot’s fabulistic ambiguity. He captures the town’s working class vibe in his own fashion, giving it a timeless, storybook feel. Cooke’s imagination really helps to sell the more fantastic moments, keeping them grounded in the story while still allowing them to stretch out and pop. Stewart is an ideal collaborator for Cooke. His color choices are spot on, running a gamut from dark, muted scenes to vistas of exploding light. He comes up with the right tones for each sequence and brings out the fantasy power of Cooke’s compositions. It’s a beautiful book to look at and a fitting tribute to Cooke, who passed away just after the release of the collected edition. The Twilight Children is labeled “Mature Readers,” but it’s not especially graphic. Fans willing to accept the narrative ambiguity will truly enjoy the mood the creators spin. A version of this review originally appeared on www.thunderalleybcp.com

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Once I got over the weirdness of Beto dialogue coming out of Darwyn Cooke characters, I found this to be an enjoyable, low-stakes B-movie enterprise. It lacks some of the political urgency and/or bat-shit wildness of Beto's best stuff in this vein (read "Chance in Hell" or some of the L&R "New Stories" if you want that), but it delivers well on its "Twilight Zone meets Telenovela" premise. Cooke's cartoony, pinup-inspired artwork and Dave Stewart's lush colors are very different from Beto's typi Once I got over the weirdness of Beto dialogue coming out of Darwyn Cooke characters, I found this to be an enjoyable, low-stakes B-movie enterprise. It lacks some of the political urgency and/or bat-shit wildness of Beto's best stuff in this vein (read "Chance in Hell" or some of the L&R "New Stories" if you want that), but it delivers well on its "Twilight Zone meets Telenovela" premise. Cooke's cartoony, pinup-inspired artwork and Dave Stewart's lush colors are very different from Beto's typical black & white comics, but they fit the story surprisingly well.

  9. 4 out of 5

    ıllıllı αíndч ıllıllı

    Most of the time I didn't really know what was happening.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Maluck

    I know whenever someone criticizes a piece of media saying "I don't get it," there is an onus on the reader to engage with the confusing art, whether by rereading or tracking down an interview or looking at the influences that surround the art and its creator(s). Sorry, but WHOOSH, that's the sound of the latter half of this series flying over my head. Cooke's artwork is gorgeous in all ways as always (shape, form, character, expression, setting, you name it), and the first two issues set up an i I know whenever someone criticizes a piece of media saying "I don't get it," there is an onus on the reader to engage with the confusing art, whether by rereading or tracking down an interview or looking at the influences that surround the art and its creator(s). Sorry, but WHOOSH, that's the sound of the latter half of this series flying over my head. Cooke's artwork is gorgeous in all ways as always (shape, form, character, expression, setting, you name it), and the first two issues set up an intriguing magical-realism mystery with lots of peripheral characters and potential symbolism to connect like constellations. Stewart's colors bathe each page in just the right light. Somewhere in the third issue, I became really skeptical that it would all wrap up in any satisfying way, and the fourth issue confirmed that suspicion. I admire Hernandez's conviction to let his story speak for itself and let readers come up with their own interpretations without leaning on obvious exposition or hand-holding, but this story could have used a few more breadcrumbs to guide me along. Otherwise, there's a lot of seemingly pointless chitchat between characters, some of whom are one-dimensional and seem to just use up pages. I enjoyed much of my trip out to this beachside town, but it may have just been a pretty tourist trap.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Althea J.

    I read issues #1-4, which will be collected as this trade. The art is PHENOMENAL The colors are PHENOMENAL The story.... wtf happened? I was hooked in, thinking all of the mysteries would coalesce into a triumphant resolution, and all would be revealed, but no. This had the makings of a fantastic fable. The incredible art could've covered for a story that was lacking, but this just didn't make sense. Am I missing something? All the more frustrating when you think of how much amazing talent went into I read issues #1-4, which will be collected as this trade. The art is PHENOMENAL The colors are PHENOMENAL The story.... wtf happened? I was hooked in, thinking all of the mysteries would coalesce into a triumphant resolution, and all would be revealed, but no. This had the makings of a fantastic fable. The incredible art could've covered for a story that was lacking, but this just didn't make sense. Am I missing something? All the more frustrating when you think of how much amazing talent went into the visual component of the story. AND, yet another example of why wait-for-trade is the way to go. So you don't invest in a promising title that will only pull you along for months and end up pissing you off. But it is worth it to thumb through this book at your LCS... sooooooo pretty. And for the love of god, get Darwyn Cooke and Dave Stewart back together, but on a great story.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    I was really looking forward to this 'dream team' GN by Gilbert Hernandez and Darwyn Cooke...but I was disappointed. There is nothing 'wrong' with this GN - the motivation for the 'visitation' is never fully explained. In the end I was left questioning what the common thread was that ran through the story. The art is beautiful - RIP Darwyn Cooke - thank you for so many wonderful stories.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    I loved this story and graphics. This is my first comic and I think that I may get addicted to them. This story kept me reading until the end. I had to find out what the ending was.

  14. 5 out of 5

    angela

    I have absolutely no feelings after finishing this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Siina

    The Twilight Children wasn't something I expected, which is probably a good thing. The comic is quite weird and magical at the same time. It's based in a small village in Latin America. Suddenly these big white orbs start appearing and people disappear. Along with the orbs there's this white haired woman, who seems to have something to do with the whole thing, and we have investigators and the townspeople all in this mess. It's a mystery of some sort, but it never really gets a closure, which bo The Twilight Children wasn't something I expected, which is probably a good thing. The comic is quite weird and magical at the same time. It's based in a small village in Latin America. Suddenly these big white orbs start appearing and people disappear. Along with the orbs there's this white haired woman, who seems to have something to do with the whole thing, and we have investigators and the townspeople all in this mess. It's a mystery of some sort, but it never really gets a closure, which bothered me. The characters are feeble and it's hard to feel anything for them - perhaps the comic is too short for a story like this. The idea is marvelous with its scifi like setting, and the Latin America part I really adored. The pace is good, but the plot is all over the place. So, basically this is a quick read, but leaves you somewhat empty. The art reminds me of the Flintstones in a good way! The colors fit the world well and the curvy girls are awesome. The art is simple, but effective. There's only light shading and there's the feeling of the 1970s attached to the comic, which is actually very groovy. The view angles vary and all in all the art is a good companion to the story - even if the said story is lacking. I'm not saying the comic lost its potential, but mostly I just wish Hernández had structured it better and used more pages to convey it. I know he can do it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Some of Darwyn Cooke's last published work, making that vivacious style even more poignant than a Cooke-drawn world already was (there was always something ineffably bittersweet in those perfect eyelashes he drew, sweeping out just enough past the edge of the face to speak of humanity's long, long history of yearning for one particular kiss in an unattainable summer somewhere in the past). The story's by Gilbert Hernandez, and very much within the territory for which he's known: strange goings-o Some of Darwyn Cooke's last published work, making that vivacious style even more poignant than a Cooke-drawn world already was (there was always something ineffably bittersweet in those perfect eyelashes he drew, sweeping out just enough past the edge of the face to speak of humanity's long, long history of yearning for one particular kiss in an unattainable summer somewhere in the past). The story's by Gilbert Hernandez, and very much within the territory for which he's known: strange goings-on in a Latin American village (this time: enigmatic glowing spheres); the town siren feeling threatened by the beautiful new arrival; the town drunk with a tragic history. A sketchbook at the back shows how he would have drawn it, and it would have been fine, but basically minor Beto; seeing his world rendered by Cooke is the attraction here.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    I started out excited at the prospect of the series...The art is enticing and the fact that it's a mini series made me feel like we'd get answers at the end. After the first issue, I felt confused. I thought surely I had missed something or not read between the lines enough. That fact kept me going, especially considering there were only 3 more issues. Perhaps the mystery is what is supposed to keep me intrigued? Second issue was more of the same but I thought, I'm halfway through. I can't give u I started out excited at the prospect of the series...The art is enticing and the fact that it's a mini series made me feel like we'd get answers at the end. After the first issue, I felt confused. I thought surely I had missed something or not read between the lines enough. That fact kept me going, especially considering there were only 3 more issues. Perhaps the mystery is what is supposed to keep me intrigued? Second issue was more of the same but I thought, I'm halfway through. I can't give up now. Third issue in, I really saw it coming altogether and looked forward to putting the pieces in place in the last issue. ...Nope. No answers. No big reveal. It was fast but unsatisfying. I can't recommend the series. =\

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hilda

    What a magical start! Poor Bundo, to live with that tragedy and then become the town drunk. No one believes him and it seems like he's the only one paying attention to what's going on. I can't wait for more!! P.S. This is NOT related to the comic at all. My favorite time of day is twilight. Morning or afternoon, I love it. It's so beautiful and peaceful. Actually I take it back, I prefer afternoon. I just want to sleep in. ;-)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mihai Barbat

    WTF did I just read? Really, even if I write the synopsis it still doesn't make sense. I think somebody got super high and asked Darwyn Cooke to draw the experience. It's the only scenario that works in my head. I normally don't do this when I'm 100% confident in my pick and blindly pre-order the book, but this time I felt the need to check the ebook version ahead and with zero regrets proceeded then to cancel my order. So I'm still looking for that 2016 comics coup de coeur!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I believe this is some the last work from Darwyn Cooke, and as usual, his work was outstanding, beautiful, pleasing to the eye. Unfortunately the story didn't really get me. It was kind of boring, to be honest. But if you're a Darwyn Cooke fan this is well worth taking a look at. I received an advanced copy of this from NetGalley.com and the publisher.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    This has a really cool cover and interesting plot that is going to appeal to a lot of people. Unfortunately, I found it hardly made any sense and have no feelings about the plot or characters, or any real sense what it was all about. I also thought the dialogue was very bad. The art is great though!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I loved Darwyn Cooke's masterful visual storytelling, and I was rapidly drawn in but the suspense. However, I didn't find the payoff sufficient for the buildup, and it kind of annoyed me that the story uses science stereotypical scorned women and horndog men as a scaffold.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kurt

    Beautiful artwork, lame story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    Did anyone ever tell you the tale about that time the moon's daughter shows up in a lazy latinx fishing town? No? This is the story of how there's no way to shake a town like that up, the same old lazy gestures, a rhythm that matches the waves and pulls like the tide. An alien woman shows up, and so do weird government types. The town knows. There is very little to the story - it's an honest slice of life story that just happens to coincide with the appearance of alien orbs. The art is amazing. Did anyone ever tell you the tale about that time the moon's daughter shows up in a lazy latinx fishing town? No? This is the story of how there's no way to shake a town like that up, the same old lazy gestures, a rhythm that matches the waves and pulls like the tide. An alien woman shows up, and so do weird government types. The town knows. There is very little to the story - it's an honest slice of life story that just happens to coincide with the appearance of alien orbs. The art is amazing. Lush and thick, black lines like eyeliner and warm colors. I liked it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    This story keeps you guessing at what is going on. It gives little away even at the end. The art is striking and the story is a surprise. A unique little read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Monsour

    Well.. That was disappointing. Gorgeous art but with no coherent story. The first issue sets up this cosmic mystery but everything went flat after that.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I've always enjoyed Gilbert Hernandez artwork (though not as much as brother Jaime), but this story has so many things that are unexplained that it's pretty incomprehensible. Where are the orbs and Ela from? Why did the children go blind? Where did those that were abducted go to and come back from? There are just too many mysteries left unsolved.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    Twilight Zone goodness! I wrote a huge review for this but stupid goodreads for some reason hung on me so I am not going to write that again....boooo! So what did I think of this book? I loved it, the creative team was amazing and the art was amazing and this little tale is what good SF Fantasy is, it makes you think and leaves room for speculation and discussion. World: Cooke's art is perfect and man is it ever gorgeous here, if for nothing else read it for the art, it's stunning. The world buildi Twilight Zone goodness! I wrote a huge review for this but stupid goodreads for some reason hung on me so I am not going to write that again....boooo! So what did I think of this book? I loved it, the creative team was amazing and the art was amazing and this little tale is what good SF Fantasy is, it makes you think and leaves room for speculation and discussion. World: Cooke's art is perfect and man is it ever gorgeous here, if for nothing else read it for the art, it's stunning. The world building is effortless and you get thrown into this small little island town. There is not a lot of world building, only enough to build the story and have a stage on which it plays. I kind of wished there was a little bit more building here, not a lot but just enough to make the world a bit less choppy which I did find sometimes. Story: Twilight Zone, this is what it feels like. The story is great and the ending superb and poetic. I love how not everything is explained and like a good SF story it leaves the reader thinking and speculating. I did however find that because of it being 4 issues there were character and world building aspects of the book that was lacking and sometimes made for some choppy pacing. Characters: Interesting but not deep. The main thing was the mystery of the story and much like the world building the character development was not a key feature. There is still some but character types are established very quickly and that's about it, there is not a lot of arc and development and if there was it was a little bit choppy. I think an extra issue would have done this series wonder. Really good but not perfect. The art is perfect though! I would love more stories like this from this creative team, maybe make it an anthology!!! Onward to the next book!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Gilbert Hernandez and Darwyn Cooke channel the more romantic side of science fiction for “The Twilight Children”. The two of them working together is something akin to a cartoonist supergroup, and their distinct voices and unique storytelling sensibilities come together to create something eerie, fascinating, and beautiful. And it almost all works, too. n all honesty, Gilbert Hernandez and Darwyn Cooke were never a team I pictured working together. Don’t get me wrong, both of them are talented ca Gilbert Hernandez and Darwyn Cooke channel the more romantic side of science fiction for “The Twilight Children”. The two of them working together is something akin to a cartoonist supergroup, and their distinct voices and unique storytelling sensibilities come together to create something eerie, fascinating, and beautiful. And it almost all works, too. n all honesty, Gilbert Hernandez and Darwyn Cooke were never a team I pictured working together. Don’t get me wrong, both of them are talented cartoonists, some of the strongest working today. Their styles, too, seem to come from the same retro source and they both are fantastic at delivering memorable characters. But their sensibilities and approach to storytelling are vastly different. Hernandez tends to run more toward the surreal while Cooke has this preference for violent crime capers. It’s that dichotomy coming together, I think, that really gives “The Twilight Children” its voice. The book works because these two creators were able to combine their respective styles. They’ve blended their love of B-movies and magical realist novels and quieter science fiction stories like "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" and "The Man Who Fell to Earth" to conjure up this fable of a small community dealing with an invasion they couldn’t begin to understand. Read the rest of my review at Multiveristy Comics.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Silence

    You may find this and other reviews at: owlsandvowels.org I’m a bit heartbroken over this title. It was my jam all the way until the end. The artwork is bright and crisp, perfect for capturing the tropical landscape without being cheesy. The characters and plot felt genuine and believable, which isn’t easy to do with sci-fi content. It is safe to say that The Twilight Children was quickly moving up in the ranks for graphic novels to adore. Then the unthinkable happened: it ended. One and done wit You may find this and other reviews at: owlsandvowels.org I’m a bit heartbroken over this title. It was my jam all the way until the end. The artwork is bright and crisp, perfect for capturing the tropical landscape without being cheesy. The characters and plot felt genuine and believable, which isn’t easy to do with sci-fi content. It is safe to say that The Twilight Children was quickly moving up in the ranks for graphic novels to adore. Then the unthinkable happened: it ended. One and done with zero enlightenment or closure. Through its four issues we see that there is a town with strange white orbs that can make kids go blind and teleport the locals. What we don’t see is why, what it means, or any other literary crescendo. The plot just kind of hangs there, which wasn’t enough to lead me to a happy conclusion. I feel that if Hernandez and Cooke can band together and crank out a few more issues, this series will hit five star status. Here’s to hoping they have a change of heart and keep it going, because I liked the beginning a lot. *I would like to thank Edelweiss and the publisher for providing me with a free ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review*

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.