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Muscle Up: How Strength Training Beats Obesity, Cancer, and Heart Disease, and Why Everyone Should Do It

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Over the past few decades, mainstream health experts have universally recommended aerobic exercise as a uniquely health-promoting activity. Yet now, Americans are fatter than ever. Aerobic exercise not only has a very poor record at fat loss, it might even cause weight gain. Strength training - also known as weightlifting or resistance training - has much greater power to Over the past few decades, mainstream health experts have universally recommended aerobic exercise as a uniquely health-promoting activity. Yet now, Americans are fatter than ever. Aerobic exercise not only has a very poor record at fat loss, it might even cause weight gain. Strength training - also known as weightlifting or resistance training - has much greater power to cause fat loss. What's more, since it builds muscle mass, strength training has huge advantages over aerobic exercise when it comes to improving health. Greater muscle strength means less cancer and heart disease, besides smaller waist size and less body fat. Aerobic exercise, while it can increase cardiovascular fitness, does next to nothing to combat two of the central maladies of aging: sarcopenia (loss of muscle) and osteoporosis. Strength training robustly fights sarcopenia and osteoporosis, and can stop older adults from becoming frail and can keep them out of nursing homes. Whether you're a young and healthy man, a middle-aged woman looking to lose fat, or an elderly person who wants to stay strong and independent, strength training has the most to offer of any exercise. Everyone who exercises should add a strength training component to it. There's simply no other better way to fight obesity, diabetes, cancer, and frailty, and to instill self-confidence and get an attractive body. Muscle Up shows why everyone should train for strength and why aerobic exercise is not optimal. The book surveys the beneficial health effects of strength training, all of it supported by scientific research, with studies cited. You'll also learn how to start a strength training program. There's also a chapter on strength training's cousin, high-intensity interval training (HIT), which can get you in superb physical condition in literally just minutes a week. If you're not getting the results you want from your aerobic exercise, read Muscle Up and see why you should take up strength training. Or you could keep jogging or using the stair-stepper for a few more years and see how that works.


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Over the past few decades, mainstream health experts have universally recommended aerobic exercise as a uniquely health-promoting activity. Yet now, Americans are fatter than ever. Aerobic exercise not only has a very poor record at fat loss, it might even cause weight gain. Strength training - also known as weightlifting or resistance training - has much greater power to Over the past few decades, mainstream health experts have universally recommended aerobic exercise as a uniquely health-promoting activity. Yet now, Americans are fatter than ever. Aerobic exercise not only has a very poor record at fat loss, it might even cause weight gain. Strength training - also known as weightlifting or resistance training - has much greater power to cause fat loss. What's more, since it builds muscle mass, strength training has huge advantages over aerobic exercise when it comes to improving health. Greater muscle strength means less cancer and heart disease, besides smaller waist size and less body fat. Aerobic exercise, while it can increase cardiovascular fitness, does next to nothing to combat two of the central maladies of aging: sarcopenia (loss of muscle) and osteoporosis. Strength training robustly fights sarcopenia and osteoporosis, and can stop older adults from becoming frail and can keep them out of nursing homes. Whether you're a young and healthy man, a middle-aged woman looking to lose fat, or an elderly person who wants to stay strong and independent, strength training has the most to offer of any exercise. Everyone who exercises should add a strength training component to it. There's simply no other better way to fight obesity, diabetes, cancer, and frailty, and to instill self-confidence and get an attractive body. Muscle Up shows why everyone should train for strength and why aerobic exercise is not optimal. The book surveys the beneficial health effects of strength training, all of it supported by scientific research, with studies cited. You'll also learn how to start a strength training program. There's also a chapter on strength training's cousin, high-intensity interval training (HIT), which can get you in superb physical condition in literally just minutes a week. If you're not getting the results you want from your aerobic exercise, read Muscle Up and see why you should take up strength training. Or you could keep jogging or using the stair-stepper for a few more years and see how that works.

30 review for Muscle Up: How Strength Training Beats Obesity, Cancer, and Heart Disease, and Why Everyone Should Do It

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jared Matthew

    Great Book On Weights vs Cardio This is a great book for those that don’t understand why strength training is better than long distance cardio. I powerlifted in high school and went to state 3/4 years, placed 1st in bench and third in deadlift in my weight class so it’s not like I didn’t understand these concepts to begin with. What it did was help me understand that training with weights every day is good but not necessary and that it is much more safe than running 10 miles a day. I’d recommend Great Book On Weights vs Cardio This is a great book for those that don’t understand why strength training is better than long distance cardio. I powerlifted in high school and went to state 3/4 years, placed 1st in bench and third in deadlift in my weight class so it’s not like I didn’t understand these concepts to begin with. What it did was help me understand that training with weights every day is good but not necessary and that it is much more safe than running 10 miles a day. I’d recommend this book to those that are new or experienced in strength training. If you are new or skeptical of weights you will benefit more from it though. Worth the money and it is a relatively short read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Spot on! Lift heavy things, so heavy you may need a spotter. Liked reading this book and it gives me motivation to jump start my lifting, and to lift in s better new way. I may use this book as a quarterly motivation read to my exercise routine.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pavan Raju

    3/5: It was a pretty scientific sounding book from the very beginning. There are lots of high level points that I agreed with. This is definitely a book I need to read through again to really digest it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    ybk

    Written by a practitioner. This book did not much add to what I know/do currently - strength training and paleo diet, but it is good to read (a quick read) from another practitioner. One thing I got - at the end of the day, you need to design a system that works for you, constantly.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    Good suggestions for a 30 minute 2-3 time per week whole body strength training with 5 major compound exercises.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hesham

    the important statement of this book is that the weight lifting training sessions are better for your health than the aerobic training

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alessandro Massa

    Mindblowing in its own way. Shook my way of seeing training -- shook me out of my seat too. Just joined the gym: Mangan is to be thanked

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alex T.

    This is a very good motivator for someone looking to start weightlifting. It doesn't have any information you couldn't find by reading exercise blogs but it's nice to have it all compiled together with citations. It's short, but that's a feature rather than a bug - you can lend it to people and they won't find it too long or intimidating to finish. Five stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paul Nixon

  10. 5 out of 5

    Steve Goguen

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ty Beard

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  14. 5 out of 5

    Thomas C

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lee

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rahul

  17. 4 out of 5

    PolicemanPrawn

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anshul Johri

  19. 5 out of 5

    Olivier or Caroline

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karl

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dhawal G

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

  23. 5 out of 5

    Francois

  24. 4 out of 5

    Drew Johnson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael Kiefer

  26. 5 out of 5

    Suhrob

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jake Giltsoff

  29. 4 out of 5

    Roberto Lopez Gutierrez

  30. 4 out of 5

    Magusj

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