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Soft Machines: Nanotechnology and Life

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Enthusiasts look forward to a time when tiny machines reassemble matter and process information with unparalleled power and precision. But is their vision realistic? Where is the science heading? As nanotechnology (a new technology that many believe will transform society in the next on hundred years) rises higher in the news agenda and popular consciousness, there is a re Enthusiasts look forward to a time when tiny machines reassemble matter and process information with unparalleled power and precision. But is their vision realistic? Where is the science heading? As nanotechnology (a new technology that many believe will transform society in the next on hundred years) rises higher in the news agenda and popular consciousness, there is a real need for a book which discusses clearly the science on which this technology will be based. While it is most easy to simply imagine these tiny machines as scaled-down versions of the macroscopic machines we are all familiar with, the way things behave on small scales is quite different to the way they behave on large scales. Engineering on the nanoscale will use very different principles to those we are used to in our everyday lives, and the materials used in nanotehnology will be soft and mutable, rather than hard and unyielding. Soft Machines explains in a lively and very accessible manner why the nanoworld is so different to the macro-world which we are all familiar with. Why does nature engineer things in the way it does, and how can we learn to use these unfamiliar principles to create valuable new materials and artefacts which will have a profound effect on medicine, electronics, energy and the environment in the twenty-first century. With a firmer understanding of the likely relationship between nanotechnology and nature itself, we can gain a much clearer notion of what dangers this powerful technology may potentially pose, as well as come to realize that nanotechnology will have more in common with biology than with conventional engineering.


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Enthusiasts look forward to a time when tiny machines reassemble matter and process information with unparalleled power and precision. But is their vision realistic? Where is the science heading? As nanotechnology (a new technology that many believe will transform society in the next on hundred years) rises higher in the news agenda and popular consciousness, there is a re Enthusiasts look forward to a time when tiny machines reassemble matter and process information with unparalleled power and precision. But is their vision realistic? Where is the science heading? As nanotechnology (a new technology that many believe will transform society in the next on hundred years) rises higher in the news agenda and popular consciousness, there is a real need for a book which discusses clearly the science on which this technology will be based. While it is most easy to simply imagine these tiny machines as scaled-down versions of the macroscopic machines we are all familiar with, the way things behave on small scales is quite different to the way they behave on large scales. Engineering on the nanoscale will use very different principles to those we are used to in our everyday lives, and the materials used in nanotehnology will be soft and mutable, rather than hard and unyielding. Soft Machines explains in a lively and very accessible manner why the nanoworld is so different to the macro-world which we are all familiar with. Why does nature engineer things in the way it does, and how can we learn to use these unfamiliar principles to create valuable new materials and artefacts which will have a profound effect on medicine, electronics, energy and the environment in the twenty-first century. With a firmer understanding of the likely relationship between nanotechnology and nature itself, we can gain a much clearer notion of what dangers this powerful technology may potentially pose, as well as come to realize that nanotechnology will have more in common with biology than with conventional engineering.

48 review for Soft Machines: Nanotechnology and Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kristie

    This was a great book I borrowed from a scientist friend. It's an easy read for regular folks and explains how nanotechnology works at the smallest levels. It gave me ideas for artwork. The author is British and has a great sense of humor.

  2. 5 out of 5

    dr.dominguez

    A good general overview of the issues as they are playing out now - a good bathroom book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Bollman

  4. 4 out of 5

    Artem Kovera

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

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    Steven

  7. 5 out of 5

    Xiao Li

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    Lucy Portsmouth

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel Curtisbrown

  10. 4 out of 5

    Touko Tahkokallio

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    Juko Vähätiitto

  12. 4 out of 5

    Erica

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    Xing Chen

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  22. 5 out of 5

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  23. 4 out of 5

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    Michael Moseley

  25. 4 out of 5

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  26. 4 out of 5

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  30. 5 out of 5

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    Andrew Mcmullins

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    Tim Butram

  33. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  34. 5 out of 5

    Masked

  35. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  36. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  37. 4 out of 5

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  38. 4 out of 5

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  39. 5 out of 5

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  45. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Wang

  46. 5 out of 5

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  47. 4 out of 5

    Cambria

  48. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Leng

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