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The Moral Intelligence of Children: How to Raise a Moral Child

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The question is more relevant now than ever before: what makes someone a moral person? Child psychiatrist and Harvard professor Robert Coles has dedicated much of his life to exemplifying, teaching, and writing about the moral life. Here, Coles illuminates the ways in which children become moral or not so moral adults, drawing on case studies, talks NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The question is more relevant now than ever before: what makes someone a moral person? Child psychiatrist and Harvard professor Robert Coles has dedicated much of his life to exemplifying, teaching, and writing about the moral life. Here, Coles illuminates the ways in which children become moral or not so moral adults, drawing on case studies, talks with parents, visits to nurseries and classrooms, and interviews with children. No subject could be more important and more timely--for all Americans, but especially for parents. In the tradition of such bestsellers as Cultural Literacy and Emotional Intelligence, The Moral Intelligence of Children identifies a new type of intelligence essential for success and fulfillment in life. It will be used by parents and teachers for years to come as the authoritative guide to children's moral development.


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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The question is more relevant now than ever before: what makes someone a moral person? Child psychiatrist and Harvard professor Robert Coles has dedicated much of his life to exemplifying, teaching, and writing about the moral life. Here, Coles illuminates the ways in which children become moral or not so moral adults, drawing on case studies, talks NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The question is more relevant now than ever before: what makes someone a moral person? Child psychiatrist and Harvard professor Robert Coles has dedicated much of his life to exemplifying, teaching, and writing about the moral life. Here, Coles illuminates the ways in which children become moral or not so moral adults, drawing on case studies, talks with parents, visits to nurseries and classrooms, and interviews with children. No subject could be more important and more timely--for all Americans, but especially for parents. In the tradition of such bestsellers as Cultural Literacy and Emotional Intelligence, The Moral Intelligence of Children identifies a new type of intelligence essential for success and fulfillment in life. It will be used by parents and teachers for years to come as the authoritative guide to children's moral development.

30 review for The Moral Intelligence of Children: How to Raise a Moral Child

  1. 4 out of 5

    A

    Basically, children learn morality from example. :-)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Skelly

    Interesting book with a feel of being a text book.Coles goes in depth with examples of children in situations at different stages of children. Helping the reader to identify clues as to what make a GOOD person , or a NOT SO GOOD person. It was a fascinating read however, a little too wordy for me with way too many "psychologist" terms for the average reader. In my opinion, was over the head of the average parent who might pick it up to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daniel L.

    Passing on Moral Values to the Next Generation "Three things in human life are important. The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. The third is to be kind." So said Henry James in response to his nephew when he sought advice on what he ought to do with his life. Robert Coles, known for his extraordinarily insightful thought-provoking and profoundly sensitive five-volume work, Children in Crisis, delves into what it means to be moral and goes further to examine how children - even very y Passing on Moral Values to the Next Generation "Three things in human life are important. The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. The third is to be kind." So said Henry James in response to his nephew when he sought advice on what he ought to do with his life. Robert Coles, known for his extraordinarily insightful thought-provoking and profoundly sensitive five-volume work, Children in Crisis, delves into what it means to be moral and goes further to examine how children - even very young children - acquire moral values, that is learning empathy and living by the Golden Rule, not to do unto others what one would not want done unto himself. In the first part, "Moral Intelligence," Dr. Coles examines what it means to be a good person or a not-so-good person. He discusses moral intelligence, that is, how children learn empathy and respect for others and themselves. He shows how this moral intelligence is as important, if not more important, other forms of human success and intellectual achievement. In the second part, "The Moral Archaeology of Childhood," Dr. Coles explores how children acquire empathy and other critical moral values at various stages of childhood. Drawing upon the work of Anna Freud, the infant and toddler quickly learns by the limits of "Yes" and "No." He also discusses the problems of the spoiled child and how to prevent a baby from growing up to be a bully. Dr. Coles refers to the elementary school years as the "Age of Conscience," the period when a child's verbal skills enables him to take in what he sees, hears, and reads and try to make sense of everything. In his section on adolescence, Dr. Coles explores how teens try to cope with decisions and how to understand life and new responsibilities, including coping with alcohol, drugs, sex, and other moral questions. It is during these latter two stages of development that adults play a major role in the moral development of the child by leading through example and espousing positive and meaningful values themselves. The role of adults - parents, teachers, caretakers, and doctors - is more fully explored in the third section of the book, "Letter to Teachers and Parents." Case studies of young people in the first two decades of their life provide important illustrations on the conscious and subconscious messages adults and society send to the next generation, with considerable introspection as to how parents and teachers in particular can best help children cultivate kindness and empathy by relating to them at their level and sending positive messages not through books and lectures, but actions. Like Fred Rogers, Maria Montessori, Jonathan Kozol, and Janusz Korczak, Robert Coles knows how to relate to children on their level, as full human beings at an early stage of development rather than as miniature adults or "people in training." Such people are rare; anyone who cares about children would do well reading the works of these special pedagogues. The Moral Intelligence of Children is a valuable contribution to this important genre.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Schvejda

    This is not a "how-to" book, with a strategy to impart "moral intelligence" to your children. Rather, a general outline of children's life stages, fleshed out with a generous supply of engaging anecdotal stories taken from the author's long career. A few concrete points were made... 1) Parents who supply instant gratification are setting their children up for failure in the real world. Self control is essential. (I need a drink of water... NOW!) 2) Children learn by example, and are quick to lea This is not a "how-to" book, with a strategy to impart "moral intelligence" to your children. Rather, a general outline of children's life stages, fleshed out with a generous supply of engaging anecdotal stories taken from the author's long career. A few concrete points were made... 1) Parents who supply instant gratification are setting their children up for failure in the real world. Self control is essential. (I need a drink of water... NOW!) 2) Children learn by example, and are quick to learn the difference between what you say and what you do. As teenagers they become jaded and rebellious. As an aside, the occupation most often cited by the author of children under his psychiatric care was lawyer. Perhaps they treat their home and child rearing as a combative argumentative courtroom? Not THE book on children and character, but a worthwhile read nonetheless.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Yuyu

    kecerdasan moral anak

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I admit I did not read every page of this book but I did not find it very insightful as a parent. I guess I was looking for hands-on ideas for raising a child with morality. The book discussed real or fictional examples and evaluated why children ended up without morality...not how to make sure they have morality.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ss Ho

    I started reading this book because it was in the car. It's actually my mom's book. Though it does have some cool information. I especially like reading about other people's mistakes(kids and adults,hee,hee)=D

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cara

    I like that included the voices of people with whom he's worked, but I question some of the beliefs presented. Can an infant really understand that sometimes you have to wait? Maybe just not mine...maybe I really am spoiling him ;)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    If you are looking for "bullet points" --short statements and specifics on "how to raise a moral child" this is not the book. While there are some good points, they are buried within the author's recollections of his times with kids of various ages. Not a quick, easy read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Larry Harms

    A decent book with pretty good ideas about morality and pitfalls many parents make when trying to instill it into our children. It was worth reading, but not my favorite book on the subject.

  11. 5 out of 5

    GoldenLemon

    In conclusion, lead by examples, do not send mixed moral messages.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Thought-provoking read, especially because I found it helped me see particular students in my class this year more completely, helping me better empathize with their internal difficulties.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Powers

    I didn't really finish the book. Maybe I will pick it up another time. When reading for pleasure, I much prefer stories.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    This was a very thought provoking book and I have recommended it over the years to many people in education.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beth Casey

  16. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ma.Luisa Gequinana

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pete H

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kaye

  20. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  21. 5 out of 5

    Terri

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessika Malo

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Porzenheim

  24. 5 out of 5

    Batya

  25. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Martha

  28. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Collins

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mum

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