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The American Disease: Origins of Narcotic Control

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The American Disease is a classic study of the development of drug law s in the U.S. Supporting the theory that Americans' attitudes toward d rugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint, author David Musto examines the relations between public outcry and the crea tion of prohibitive drug laws from the end of the Civil War to the pre sent day. Originally The American Disease is a classic study of the development of drug law s in the U.S. Supporting the theory that Americans' attitudes toward d rugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint, author David Musto examines the relations between public outcry and the crea tion of prohibitive drug laws from the end of the Civil War to the pre sent day. Originally published in 1973, with an expanded edition in 19 87, this third edition contains a new chapter and preface that cover t he renewed debate on policy and drug legislation from the end of the R eagan administration to the present Clinton administration.


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The American Disease is a classic study of the development of drug law s in the U.S. Supporting the theory that Americans' attitudes toward d rugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint, author David Musto examines the relations between public outcry and the crea tion of prohibitive drug laws from the end of the Civil War to the pre sent day. Originally The American Disease is a classic study of the development of drug law s in the U.S. Supporting the theory that Americans' attitudes toward d rugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint, author David Musto examines the relations between public outcry and the crea tion of prohibitive drug laws from the end of the Civil War to the pre sent day. Originally published in 1973, with an expanded edition in 19 87, this third edition contains a new chapter and preface that cover t he renewed debate on policy and drug legislation from the end of the R eagan administration to the present Clinton administration.

30 review for The American Disease: Origins of Narcotic Control

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carl

    Any raking on one factor is impossible on this book. On it's history of the legislative efforts to control narcotics it's an essential read for anyone wanting the full picture. Unfortunately, Musto is not the most entertaining author. It's pretty dry reading. Is it comphrensive? The citations at the end of the book take up 90!!!! pages. The narcotics use in the US have cycled through many phases. With the current explosion of overdose deaths with fentanyl, as they say in the movie "I'm Back!"

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    A must read to help gain some insight to our nations long history with addiction.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Russ Haeber

    Cocaine is a hell of a drug.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    i read this book for my undergraduate thesis research, and it was indispensable in that regard. though a little dry at times, the book is extremely well researched and packed full of interesting facts about the development of US drug control policy. if there is anyone who is interested in this topic, this book is the definitive resource.

  5. 4 out of 5

    AskHistorians

    The groundbreaking text in US drug history. Turn-of-the-century nonmedical use by supposedly deviant groups virtually ensured later prohibitive legislation. Substance abuse quickly became a political problem as opposed to a public health problem. Ever since, Musto argues, drug use trends follow generational cycles based on the social transfer of knowledge.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I had to read chapters 1-3 of this book for class, and I have no desire to read the rest. I know legislation and history can sometimes be boring, but as a history nerd I was expecting something a little more enjoyable to read. In fact, I am reading other books for this class that cover the same information in a much better way. Overall, it was an ok read, but not much better than that.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Deemster Diva

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Bell

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kat

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jonnyjeepington

  11. 4 out of 5

    Greg Rosen

  12. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  14. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

  15. 4 out of 5

    Imogen Budetti

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kash

  17. 4 out of 5

    Donny

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kenna

  19. 4 out of 5

    Liquidlasagna

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fatima Manuel

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charles Schuler

  24. 5 out of 5

    Abe

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  27. 5 out of 5

    Osborneinri

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ingrid McGuffog

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erica

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