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The Prophet Joseph Smith's Views on the Powers and Policy of the Government of the United States

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Archive Publishers, 47pg. paperback book (5 1/4" x 8 1/8") 2000 Archive Publishers, 47pg. paperback book (5 1/4" x 8 1/8") 2000


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Archive Publishers, 47pg. paperback book (5 1/4" x 8 1/8") 2000 Archive Publishers, 47pg. paperback book (5 1/4" x 8 1/8") 2000

37 review for The Prophet Joseph Smith's Views on the Powers and Policy of the Government of the United States

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Stockett

    I enjoyed this book a lot. None of the politics was particularly profound, but I enjoyed it more as a glimpse into the mind of Joseph Smith. This book strays from all of his prophetic writing. This writing was strictly as a citizen of the United States, expressing his views on government. It's split into two sections. The first section is an essay that he wrote and distributed as a part of his campaign for the Presidency of the United States. It expresses what he would do as President. One of the I enjoyed this book a lot. None of the politics was particularly profound, but I enjoyed it more as a glimpse into the mind of Joseph Smith. This book strays from all of his prophetic writing. This writing was strictly as a citizen of the United States, expressing his views on government. It's split into two sections. The first section is an essay that he wrote and distributed as a part of his campaign for the Presidency of the United States. It expresses what he would do as President. One of the things I found most interesting was that he was an abolitionist but he felt it would be most fair for the United States government to compensate slave owners. Here are a few quotes from the first section: On slavery: "were I the President of the United States...when that people petitioned to abolish slavery in the slave States, I would use all honorable means to have their prayers granted, and give liberty to the captive by paying the Southern gentleman a reasonable equivalent for his property, that the whole nation might be free indeed!" On National Debt: "General Jackson's administration may be denominated the acme of American glory, liberty, and prosperity: for the national debt, which in 1815, on account of the late war, was $125,000,000 and being lessened gradually, was paid up in his golden day...and that august patriot, to use his own words in his farewell address, retired, leaving 'a great people prosperous and happy, in the full enjoyment of liberty and peace, honored and respected by every nation of the world.'" The second section is a series of letters written to several Presidential candidates as well as their responses. He asks them how they would deal with the situation of the Saints, as they had been driven from Missouri. Their responses are quite noncommittal and so Joseph sends them some fairly rebuking letters. Here are a few quotes from his letters: On the state of our nation: "for the glory of America has departed, and God will set a flaming sword to guard the tree of liberty, while such mint-tithing Herods as Van Buren, Boggs, Benton, Calhoun and Clay are thrust out of the realms of virtue as fit subjects for the kingdom of fallen greatess;" On the selfishness of politicians: "Away with such self-important, self-aggrandizing and self-willed demagogues! Their friendship is colder than polar ice, and their profession meaner than the damnation of hell." All in all, I enjoyed this book. Joseph had a way with words that was very powerful. He also gets into some other interesting ideas such as how to deal with prisoners, how he's concerned that individuals in the government have gotten too much power (imagine how he would feel today) and how the government doesn't properly protect its citizens. ("Gentlemen, your cause is just, but I can do nothing for you" - Martin Van Buren, speaking about the mob actions in Missouri) It is a worthwhile read and I would recommend it to anyone interested in politics, or in learning more about Joseph Smith.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Campaign pamphlet for Joseph Smith's 1844 presidential bid, primarily written by WW Phelps. A very interesting historical artifact; of note is a particular excoriation of Martin Van Buren, who refused the LDS Church's claims for redress after being expelled from Missouri. As populist as it gets: The rich get richer. Every man has his price. Power corrupts. Elect another rich & powerful white guy and he will solve all your problems! ;) Smarter people than me have debated whether Joseph Smith's flui Campaign pamphlet for Joseph Smith's 1844 presidential bid, primarily written by WW Phelps. A very interesting historical artifact; of note is a particular excoriation of Martin Van Buren, who refused the LDS Church's claims for redress after being expelled from Missouri. As populist as it gets: The rich get richer. Every man has his price. Power corrupts. Elect another rich & powerful white guy and he will solve all your problems! ;) Smarter people than me have debated whether Joseph Smith's fluid stance on abolition was because of conviction or political advantage, so I won't opine on that. Some other political positions: release all prisoners & tell them to go and sin no more, no imprisonment for debt (as happened to Joseph Sr), grant a national bank, give the president full power to suppress mobs (again the sting from Missouri showing), make all lawyers become preachers (your theocracy is showing, Joseph!), no court martials for desertion; annex Oregon, Texas, Canada and Mexico!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cory

    I bought this little pamphlet at the Red Brick store in Nauvoo. It was pretty interesting, and basically outlined Joseph Smith's ideas and how he felt about U.S. leaders and what he would have done or what he would do in the future. Anybody who feels that Joseph Smith was in any way a racist man should read this pamphlet because his views on slavery show that he is obviously not. There were some pretty good quotes in this pamphlet, and I was surprised with Joseph's use of sayings from other lang I bought this little pamphlet at the Red Brick store in Nauvoo. It was pretty interesting, and basically outlined Joseph Smith's ideas and how he felt about U.S. leaders and what he would have done or what he would do in the future. Anybody who feels that Joseph Smith was in any way a racist man should read this pamphlet because his views on slavery show that he is obviously not. There were some pretty good quotes in this pamphlet, and I was surprised with Joseph's use of sayings from other languages. Perhaps they are things he learned in the School of Prophets.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I don't really know the context of this book, I didn't look into it. While his writing is not as sharp as his religious writings, I thought that it was fascinating to hear Joseph Smith's views on politics in a number of different areas. He speaks of military tribunals, expansion of the country, a federal reserve, and Martin van Buren's presidency, among other things. A very short read, but enlightening and fun to read. I'm glad to have found it on mormontextsproject.org and will probably read it I don't really know the context of this book, I didn't look into it. While his writing is not as sharp as his religious writings, I thought that it was fascinating to hear Joseph Smith's views on politics in a number of different areas. He speaks of military tribunals, expansion of the country, a federal reserve, and Martin van Buren's presidency, among other things. A very short read, but enlightening and fun to read. I'm glad to have found it on mormontextsproject.org and will probably read it a few more times in the future.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James Davis

    A few things that I really liked about this pamphlet. 1) To be party-minded is rediculous. (ie, republican & democrat) 2) The Constitution is inspired of God. Amen.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Darryl

    Great stuff. This is Joseph Smith's platform pamphlet for his presidential run. He had some wonderful ideas laid out here, esp. his solution to slavery and prisons and banking. So worth the read. Great stuff. This is Joseph Smith's platform pamphlet for his presidential run. He had some wonderful ideas laid out here, esp. his solution to slavery and prisons and banking. So worth the read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mahonri

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brianna Melise Stafford

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ben Reece

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephen T.

  12. 4 out of 5

    James Miller

  13. 4 out of 5

    David

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steven Farnsworth

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gary R. Kuske

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janiece

  20. 4 out of 5

    Seth

  21. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jorgina

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jey

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anders

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christy Peterson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra Peden

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erica Krueger

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kwan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  31. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  32. 5 out of 5

    Penny Tomlinson

  33. 5 out of 5

    Marc Roberts

  34. 5 out of 5

    Angel Martinez Rodela

  35. 5 out of 5

    D

  36. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

  37. 5 out of 5

    Louis

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