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Voice of the Gods

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Unable to avoid being drawn into the terrible conflict, Auraya, now protector of the Siyee, fears she will be unable to meet the conditions of the all-powerful gods she once served. And an offer from a mysterious woman may be impossible for Auraya to refuse, but, if revealed, would brand her an enemy of the gods. Now, the immortal Wilds will not be deterred in their quest Unable to avoid being drawn into the terrible conflict, Auraya, now protector of the Siyee, fears she will be unable to meet the conditions of the all-powerful gods she once served. And an offer from a mysterious woman may be impossible for Auraya to refuse, but, if revealed, would brand her an enemy of the gods. Now, the immortal Wilds will not be deterred in their quest for powerful, long-buried secrets. But they have deadly adversaries who also seek the world-shattering truth . . . and it may appear in a form that no one anticipates.


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Unable to avoid being drawn into the terrible conflict, Auraya, now protector of the Siyee, fears she will be unable to meet the conditions of the all-powerful gods she once served. And an offer from a mysterious woman may be impossible for Auraya to refuse, but, if revealed, would brand her an enemy of the gods. Now, the immortal Wilds will not be deterred in their quest Unable to avoid being drawn into the terrible conflict, Auraya, now protector of the Siyee, fears she will be unable to meet the conditions of the all-powerful gods she once served. And an offer from a mysterious woman may be impossible for Auraya to refuse, but, if revealed, would brand her an enemy of the gods. Now, the immortal Wilds will not be deterred in their quest for powerful, long-buried secrets. But they have deadly adversaries who also seek the world-shattering truth . . . and it may appear in a form that no one anticipates.

30 review for Voice of the Gods

  1. 5 out of 5

    Iris

    I pretty much read this book in one day flat! Towards the end of the second book the storyline really picks up, and then this whole third book is literally unputdownable! I'm just so impressed with the whole storyline; how different people's stories overlap and intertwine to combine into this really rich and complex narrative. Most of the characters were really well fleshed out and believable. Some of the points of view are more interesting than others (personally I always enjoyed the bits with I pretty much read this book in one day flat! Towards the end of the second book the storyline really picks up, and then this whole third book is literally unputdownable! I'm just so impressed with the whole storyline; how different people's stories overlap and intertwine to combine into this really rich and complex narrative. Most of the characters were really well fleshed out and believable. Some of the points of view are more interesting than others (personally I always enjoyed the bits with Auraya, Emerahl or Mirar as the primary subject, but got a bit bored with Danjin or more peripheral characters). The conclusion was quite satisfying although I did guess one of the major 'reveals' quite far in advance. Overall I really enjoyed this series, I wish it hadn't ended!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

    5 immortal stars!! Every time I read this series it just gets even more enjoyable. After 10 years it's still my favourite fantasy series of all time. 5 immortal stars!! Every time I read this series it just gets even more enjoyable. After 10 years it's still my favourite fantasy series of all time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Trevis

    I would have given this more stars if I could but alas... I started reading this book on 5pm Thursday 15th Sept 2011 and finished at 6am Friday 16th Sept 2011... then put it down... took a 5mins respite, got up drank one more coffee and went about my day. If there's one thing I can say about AoF, its damningly original, easy to sink into and don't let up until the last page of the trilogy. I have personally never read any other of Trudi work but that's is about to change. I'm very surprise at how I would have given this more stars if I could but alas... I started reading this book on 5pm Thursday 15th Sept 2011 and finished at 6am Friday 16th Sept 2011... then put it down... took a 5mins respite, got up drank one more coffee and went about my day. If there's one thing I can say about AoF, its damningly original, easy to sink into and don't let up until the last page of the trilogy. I have personally never read any other of Trudi work but that's is about to change. I'm very surprise at how easily I found myself hook into this series, especially as romance and amnesiac gigolos are not really my kinda genre, but this novel is about alot more than that. Its about theological warfare, blinded loyalty, the perception of good and evil and most importantly our own mortality. I'm extremely glad I went out on a whim and grab this off my local library shelf. I NEED TO THAT MORE OFTEN, oh and if you're reading this review hoping to find out a bit more about the books plot and main USP (unique selling point).... the review(s) below mine will be more helpful :D

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    This review has previously been posted at Another World Book Blog. It’s fair to say that the first two books of The Age Of The Five Trilogy were underwhelming to me. In spite of this I held on to the hope that history would repeat itself; that the third instalment of this Trudi Canavan trilogy would blow me away in the same manner as book three of The Black Magician Trilogy, had done. Regrettably, my hope was misplaced. Not only is Voice Of The Gods not in the same league as, The High Lord, it i This review has previously been posted at Another World Book Blog. It’s fair to say that the first two books of The Age Of The Five Trilogy were underwhelming to me. In spite of this I held on to the hope that history would repeat itself; that the third instalment of this Trudi Canavan trilogy would blow me away in the same manner as book three of The Black Magician Trilogy, had done. Regrettably, my hope was misplaced. Not only is Voice Of The Gods not in the same league as, The High Lord, it is also the weakest book of this trilogy. In fairness, I should probably mention that much of my disappointment with this book, and the trilogy as whole, is the result of the high expectations I had before I started reading. The Black Magician Trilogy made quite an impression on me, so I couldn’t wait to get stuck into The Age Of The Five Trilogy. Sadly, at no point was this new trilogy able to meet my expectations, nor did it ever threaten to do so. It would be easy to conclude that Voice Of The Gods is a poor novel that should be avoided. But the truth is, it’s not horrible by any means. It is, for the most part, a readable book; but one which is marred by the all the same flaws that tarnished the two previous books of the trilogy. These faults are largely responsible for why The Age Of The Trilogy doesn’t fulfil the promise of its premise. To reiterate the problems mentioned in my reviews for the first two books of the trilogy, that continue to plague this book: there are still too many point of view characters used; the narrative is not focussed enough due to the inclusion of superfluous sub-plots; and the story is predictable, principally because of the numerous parallels and similarities with The Black Magician Trilogy. Where the book remains strong, is with some of the main characters. The Pentadrian duo of Imenja, the Second Voice Of The Gods, and her Dedicated Servant, Reivan, are once again the best thing about the book. While they are both interesting characters in their own right, it is the dynamic of the friendship the two women have built that is so compelling. I can only speculate how much better this trilogy could have been if Imenja and Reivan had been the main focus of the story. Perhaps the most disappointing thing about the book, and the trilogy as a whole, is that it promised to evolve beyond the initial premise of the story, conflict between two implacable religious groups, into something much more complex and compelling. While the story certainly does develop into a more complicated tale, it doesn’t do so in a satisfactory or interesting manner. And the less said about the resolution to the third book the better. I don’t think I’ve ever read a more anti-climactic ending to a story. You would imagine that two civilisations discovering that they had been manipulated into a costly religious war by a group of sorcerers who had deceived the people into worshipping them as gods, would have far reaching ramifications. Yet it appeared that this revelation wasn’t that big a deal. It seemed as though most of the characters were more upset that their “gods” had been exposed as frauds, with all their anger reserved for those who had revealed the truth and killed the gods. In summation, there is a great story trying to get out of The Age Of The Five, sadly it never fully emerges. As a consequence it’s hard to know who to recommend it to. I would certainly advise those people who have read and enjoyed The Black Magician Trilogy to avoid this, as bitter disappointment is inevitable. I suspect that those most likely to enjoy this trilogy will be those who haven’t previously read any of Trudi Canavan’s other work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Raven

    I feel conflicted. In the beginning of this novel or more like the first half of it I thought that the writer had finally started getting somewhere and I actually was enjoying it more then the first two novels. With the last, say, 200 pages though, I wasn’t feeling enjoyment as much as frustration. The fact of the matter is one of the characters is so moronic in that part you want to throw the book across the room. It doesn’t help that she keeps going over a question to which you’ve possibly fig I feel conflicted. In the beginning of this novel or more like the first half of it I thought that the writer had finally started getting somewhere and I actually was enjoying it more then the first two novels. With the last, say, 200 pages though, I wasn’t feeling enjoyment as much as frustration. The fact of the matter is one of the characters is so moronic in that part you want to throw the book across the room. It doesn’t help that she keeps going over a question to which you’ve possibly figured out the answer in the first book (I know I did). It’s also quite frustrating because I can’t figure out if the author meant for her character to be so daft or she thinks her readers are so slow that this whole plot comes as a surprise. I think it’s the latter and that the writer unfortunately thinks she was being clever. I also felt there could have been far more detail. Or possibly the first two novels could’ve been condensed into one novel as it didn’t seem like much was going in there and that most of the detail (of what in depth detail there was) was in most of third novel of the trilogy. The ending was a bit on the pointless side too. Yes there was a point to it (a small one) but it ended up with too many questions as well which I never like at the end of a trilogy. It makes me question what the writers motives were and is this something she is going to continue with at some later date? Here’s where I’m conflicted though. I enjoyed it to a degree. Obviously, because I finished it but I think it might be that I enjoyed the storyline not how the story was told. I liked the concept, not the delivery. Which is why I gave it a rating of 3/5 when I feel I should‘ve given it more. I enjoyed the concept, the story but I can’t overlook all the flaws.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dannii (lilbob1980)

    Why oh why did it take Auraya so long to wake up and figure things out, it is rare that i figure things out before the main character as usually i am so emmersed in the story that i just take it as it comes. It was slightly annoying that she was so slow. Other than that this was a great end to the trilogy, although when i first started reading this i thought it was going to be a series of five books. It was quite an easy read and i was able to emmerse myself in the book fairly easily. If you have Why oh why did it take Auraya so long to wake up and figure things out, it is rare that i figure things out before the main character as usually i am so emmersed in the story that i just take it as it comes. It was slightly annoying that she was so slow. Other than that this was a great end to the trilogy, although when i first started reading this i thought it was going to be a series of five books. It was quite an easy read and i was able to emmerse myself in the book fairly easily. If you have read the previous two books i would recommend this one, if only just to finish it off, it wasn't the strongest book of the trilogy but well worth a read, with a satisfactory, if not obvious ending.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tierney

    Caution : Spoilers!! Omg. Best book in the series by far, but it had a crap ending. I mean, i wanna know if Auraya and Mirar got back together, how the world survived without the gods, what happened to everyone. AHH. But i asked the author if she's writing another and she said no :/. Ah well, atleast it ended kinda well. But still, too abrupt with too much info left out. This was the only book in the series that i actually looked forward to reading, i was really getting into it and couldnt wait to Caution : Spoilers!! Omg. Best book in the series by far, but it had a crap ending. I mean, i wanna know if Auraya and Mirar got back together, how the world survived without the gods, what happened to everyone. AHH. But i asked the author if she's writing another and she said no :/. Ah well, atleast it ended kinda well. But still, too abrupt with too much info left out. This was the only book in the series that i actually looked forward to reading, i was really getting into it and couldnt wait to see what was going to happen. Overall, best in the series, loved it, ending was abrupt and i reccommend to lovers of Earths Children, his dark materials, etc.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel

    I pushed through today so I could finish this. Nothing really happened until the last 200 pages and hooollyyy shit the last 50 pages!! I was so close to believing this would turn out to be bad, but it took a massive turn. I absolutely love the way Canavan explores the uses and ways of magic in all her books.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tim Mercer

    This is the solid end to the series. I still found the conversations a little stilted but the story is good. You may have already seen the plot twist coming by half way through 3.5 stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I haven't really said much about these Age of the Five books so far, mostly because I wanted to wait until I reached the end of the trilogy before making a judgement. I enjoyed the plot of these books, and really appreciate how your opinion on the different characters/religions/societies etc. change throughout. One of the things I found irritating was the constantly shifting narrative; 5 pages would be dedicated to Auraya, then the next 5 to Mirar, then the next 5 to Emerahl, then the next five I haven't really said much about these Age of the Five books so far, mostly because I wanted to wait until I reached the end of the trilogy before making a judgement. I enjoyed the plot of these books, and really appreciate how your opinion on the different characters/religions/societies etc. change throughout. One of the things I found irritating was the constantly shifting narrative; 5 pages would be dedicated to Auraya, then the next 5 to Mirar, then the next 5 to Emerahl, then the next five to Danjin, then the next five to Reivan, and then back to Auraya. Whilst I can appreciate the functionality of this writing style, it became a little irritating. My attention would gain some momentum, then suddenly there would be a narrative switch, and it would have to start over again. The ending was also a little disappointing, not with regards to plot, but with regard to the finer details of the book. I enjoyed the fact that the Pentadrian and the Circlian gods were actually the same people, and I enjoy the fact that they were killed. A few things I didn't like though: 1. Both armies were ready for war, they had just witnessed their gods being killed (gods they had followed for centuries) and they decide that everything is fine and they just go home. 2. Danjin Spear leaves thinking that Auraya betrayed the Circlians. 3. When Chaia managed to convince Auraya that he didn't try to kill her, she seemed to completely forget the fact that he was still responsible for the deaths of millions of Circlians and Pentadrians, and that he was using them as "pieces of a game". I wish she had been more badass! 4. There were a lot of clichés at the end in terms of language and analogy. In the end, I did enjoy reading this series and was quite interested in many of the characters. Doubt I'd read it again though.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Fisher

    I have enjoyed all of the books written by this author and once again this book achieved the same high standard. You either enjoy this genre or you do not. Pure escapism. This book was the last of the 'Age of 5' trilogy and all of the loose ends were skilfully dealt with. However, I had guessed the main twist regarding the 'Gods' well before the end of the book - I will not spoil this aspect for any other readers. This did not detract my enjoyment of the book, which I found to be the usual page I have enjoyed all of the books written by this author and once again this book achieved the same high standard. You either enjoy this genre or you do not. Pure escapism. This book was the last of the 'Age of 5' trilogy and all of the loose ends were skilfully dealt with. However, I had guessed the main twist regarding the 'Gods' well before the end of the book - I will not spoil this aspect for any other readers. This did not detract my enjoyment of the book, which I found to be the usual page turner with enough sub-plots and complexity to keep the reader interested in the story. A good read, but you do need to go back to the first book in the trilogy and read them in sequence, otherwise the story would be difficult to follow, especially the sub-plots and characters.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nicolle Evans

    I found this trilogy by Trudi Canavan after immersing myself in The Black Magician trilogy. This is drastically different to the one mentioned above and personally seems to be aimed at an older audience. The depth of the characters and the world you are in is immense. The settings are rich with details and the characters are deep and interesting. The world is big and you get to see alot of it through the three books. The use of magic is interesting and even more interesting are the characters wh I found this trilogy by Trudi Canavan after immersing myself in The Black Magician trilogy. This is drastically different to the one mentioned above and personally seems to be aimed at an older audience. The depth of the characters and the world you are in is immense. The settings are rich with details and the characters are deep and interesting. The world is big and you get to see alot of it through the three books. The use of magic is interesting and even more interesting are the characters who use it. It is truly beautifully written; it is rich in description and because of it plants you right in the story with the characters (of which there are many). I can't recommend this series, and author, enough.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kai

    started 07/10/2009 This was a fantastic conclusion to a very good trilogy. I'd figured out most of the ending before I got to the second book, but I loved the interaction between the characters and the whole character build up. Canavan has a style of writing that really appeals and keeps you wanting to turn pages and finish the novel. My only problem was that I was looking for the next chapter right up until the last page and found I was disappointed there was no more. started 07/10/2009 This was a fantastic conclusion to a very good trilogy. I'd figured out most of the ending before I got to the second book, but I loved the interaction between the characters and the whole character build up. Canavan has a style of writing that really appeals and keeps you wanting to turn pages and finish the novel. My only problem was that I was looking for the next chapter right up until the last page and found I was disappointed there was no more.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I enjoyed the third installment of this trilogy, but didn't find the end as satisfying as I'd hoped. There were some interesting revelations in this one, and some great development, but there were some plot threads that never really developed and the larger conflict came so near the end that it felt sudden and a bit unresolved for me. I enjoyed the third installment of this trilogy, but didn't find the end as satisfying as I'd hoped. There were some interesting revelations in this one, and some great development, but there were some plot threads that never really developed and the larger conflict came so near the end that it felt sudden and a bit unresolved for me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bakasura

    Globally, I enjoyed reading these books. While it took me time to get interested in the story due to a start that I found slow, it became much more interesting in the 2nd book. I liked most point of view characters, how the world was built, the fact that things are rarely what they initially seem to be. What I liked less was that I found the ending to be a little bit rushed, what happens in the 3rd part of the 3rd book could have filled an entire book in itself. It will be hard to discuss with m Globally, I enjoyed reading these books. While it took me time to get interested in the story due to a start that I found slow, it became much more interesting in the 2nd book. I liked most point of view characters, how the world was built, the fact that things are rarely what they initially seem to be. What I liked less was that I found the ending to be a little bit rushed, what happens in the 3rd part of the 3rd book could have filled an entire book in itself. It will be hard to discuss with more details without spoilers, so be warned that everything that comes below contains spoilers. (view spoiler)[Things that I liked : - The grey morality, and the playing with the "good vs evil" trope. For many reasons, in the first book, you would think that Circlians are good and Pentadrians are evil (be it only because Circlians is the point of view faction, while there is no point of view character for Pentadrians). But in the second book, there is a Pentadrian point of view character and then, the more the story progress, the more it becomes obvious there isn't a good side and a bad side. Or at least, not the sides we would have thought of. The real "good guys" end being the Wilds while gods are the true "bad guys". - The Wilds. They are the most interesting characters in the story, and they obviously are the characters that audience is supposed to side with. I liked all the mystery around the Gull in the second book, I really felt that he was a legend character. - I also liked Imenja and Reivan, who showed a very different view of Pentadrian side than what we saw in the first book. Things that I liked less : - The pace is awkward. The story is switching between points of view too fast. Every time you really want to know what happens next, be sure the story is switching point of view. This is more frustrating than anything else. - And problem is, some points of view are much more interesting than others. While I enjoyed the Mirar's, Emerahl's, Reivan's and Auraya's points of view, I got quite bored with Danjin's, Tryss' or Imi points of view. - Speaking of which, some point of view characters in the first or second book just completely vanish in the next book(s). I mean, what happened to Tryss and Imi ? Tryss is non-existent in books 2 and 3 after being a point of view character in book 1. Imi is nowhere to be found in book 3, she is just mentioned but never actually appears. What's the point of even making them point of view characters if they are to disappear from the story later on ? I can understand to some extent Imi's story : it's what made the alliance between Pentadrians and Elai possible. But Tryss ? What's the point ? He invents hunting harness and... that's it. In book 2 he is just mentioned for that, in book 3 I don't think his name appears even once. Honestly, the Siyee could have been introduced entirely through Auraya's point of view, and Tryss only mentioned as an inventor, that wouldn't have been shocking, and I wouldn't wonder why the author made a point of view character only to remove him from the story in subsequent books. I really think Tryss should either have been present in all 3 books, or he should have simply never been a point of view character. If the author wanted a Siyee point of view character, why not someone like Sreil instead, who does something in all three books ? - There is also something that bothers me with one of the plot twists. It is revealed at the end that Circlian and Pentadrian gods are actually the same. My concern with it is that I already started to suspect this in book 1. And in book 2 it was just totally obvious to me. So, how come nobody understands it before Auraya at the very end (and even then, she only understands because she can sense gods and thus finds out only five gods are present at the war, instead of the expected 10, and that Pentadrian gods are nowhere to be seen) ? I mean come on. 5 gods for each faction, on top of that for similar domain (both factions have a king of the gods, a goddess of fertility, a god of war, a goddess whose main purpose is being feminine, and a fortune-related god (though the case of Saru/Sraal is less obvious than the others). I can understand that the Whites and the Voices never understood, they have a very partial view on things, they were directly manipulated by the gods. But the Wilds ? They have been around for so long, have great knowledge, have a much more global point of view than anyone else. It is obvious they know quite a few about the gods due to their old age. They know the Circlian gods, since they can tell story about them. They also never heard about Pentadrian gods before the Age of Five. So, when they first heard about Pentadrians having 5 gods nobody ever heard about, how come none of them wondered where these gods came from ? Because as a reader, when I heard about the Pentadrian gods in book 1, for me the only possibilities where that they didn't exist (which we quickly learn to be false, in the same book, since the Voices are shown to be as strong as the Whites and Auraya sees one of their gods), that they came out of nowhere and nobody knows how (which is quite weird), or that they were the Circlian gods under another name who controlled both factions for whatever reason. If I, as a reader, could think about that, how come none of the Wilds ever thought about it in a century ? Ok, I can excuse Mirar, he had memory and personality issues. To some extent, I can excuse the Gull, he is a lone wolf and probably didn't care that much anyway. But Emerahl and the Twins ? The understood more complicated things, I can't understand how the idea that both pantheons are the same never crossed their mind. Auraya is slow to understand as well. When prisoner at the Pentadrians' capital, right in their main temple, she keeps seeing Circlian gods, but never any trace of Pentadrian gods, but she never seems to find that particularly weird, and at no moment does she consider that a possible explanation would be that they are the same gods. As a result, it really bothered me that the reveal occurred so late in the story, given how early I guessed it. There are just so many obvious clues. Clues that most readers will notice, but that immortal wizards with thousands years of experience won't. - Then, when the reveal comes, some reactions seem unnatural and really weird to me. Let's remind : everyone learnt that both pantheons were the same. The gods were playing with humans as with pawns, making them fight each other for the gods' amusement. They also lied about eternal life to make people worship them. I can understand Nekaun's reaction, he was weird anyway at that point. I think the other Voices have the proper reaction : they are angry, but are aiming at the future, the Voices plan to continue to lead their nation as much as they can. But the Circlians' reaction, honestly, is completely dumb. They become just even more fanatics now that the gods are dead. They are angry at Auraya and the Wilds, instead of the gods that played with them for 100 years. Yes, Auraya just revealed the truth about the gods, while the Wilds did what was necessary to get rid of the threat. The gods lied to their worshippers they viewed as pawns on the chessboard. But let's blame the Wilds and consider Auraya a traitor, right ? They obviously are the bad guys in the story... I am particularly disappointed with Danjin, he ends considering Auraya was a traitor for joining the Wilds. Come on ! The Wilds are the good guys, how can Circlians be that dumb ? Honestly, at that point I wished the two armies would have battled anyway with a Pentadrians victory, Circlians are just too dumb to live. - The ending feels really rushed to me. The reveal. Gods are dead. Everyone gets angry and goes back home. I would have liked to know how exactly things are going for Pentadrians and Circlians. But we can only guess. I would also have liked to know more about how the Wilds are doing. We only hear very quickly about their plans. I would have liked to know whether or not they were successful, whether or not they were treated better now that the gods were gone, ... The only one I have a fair idea what he is doing is the Gull, since he changed nothing, it's quite paradoxical that the one who all throughout the books seems the most mysterious ends up being the only one who leave me no unanswered question. The Wilds also planned to make a reunion every year. I think a nice epilogue would have been to make this reunion 50 years later. But instead... - We get an epilogue that, to me, is not an epilogue. It's more a prologue to a 4th book. Except there won't be a 4th book. Come on, I wanted to know what happened to Circlians, Pentadrians and the Wild. I don't care about Sennon. I wanted a proper conclusion to the story, not the introduction to a new story that will most likely never be written. It would have been more interesting to conclude the story properly and let us guess what could happen in the future. So globally, I enjoyed the book, but I'm a bit frustrated by the ending. The ending happens too fast, it lacks a proper conclusion and instead, gives an introduction to another story that we will quite probably never get to read anyway since the author is not planning to write it anytime soon, if ever. (hide spoiler)]

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I started reading this in May, gave it a rest, and finished it for 2 reasons: firstly to see if the obvious "twist" the series has been building to since book 1 was really going to happen (it did), and second because it fills a square on Fantasy Bingo. I think what annoyed me most about this book was that everyone had an annoying tendancy to take things at face value, which led to people falling for obvious deception. On several occasions, the Pentadrians were shown converting people by giving a I started reading this in May, gave it a rest, and finished it for 2 reasons: firstly to see if the obvious "twist" the series has been building to since book 1 was really going to happen (it did), and second because it fills a square on Fantasy Bingo. I think what annoyed me most about this book was that everyone had an annoying tendancy to take things at face value, which led to people falling for obvious deception. On several occasions, the Pentadrians were shown converting people by giving a bit of charity and saying "See, we aren't really bad," only to have the charity case echo "I guess the Pentarians aren't really so bad!" and become an apostate with no further thought, then being shocked about the deception a chapter later. It's even more jarring when the person is accepting a "truth" about themselves. ("We've chosen you because you are wise and brave." Yes, thought the dupe, I suppose I am wise and brave. I deserve to be chosen.) In light of that, it makes complete sense that (view spoiler)[over the course of several hundred years, no one noticed the Circlian gods had basically the same names and personalities as the Pentadrian gods (hide spoiler)] , but it doesn't make for a satisfying ending.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hayley

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This trilogy was really really good. I did enjoy it even more than the black magician trilogy and found the ending much more satisfying. I'm mildly disappointed though because it had the potential to be a super-awesome 5 star book. If Trudi had just built up a little bit more tension before the climax it would have got there, but the ending kind of rushed by. The characters were so well portrayed and varied, and many of them were lovable and understandable, even when they were enemies of each othe This trilogy was really really good. I did enjoy it even more than the black magician trilogy and found the ending much more satisfying. I'm mildly disappointed though because it had the potential to be a super-awesome 5 star book. If Trudi had just built up a little bit more tension before the climax it would have got there, but the ending kind of rushed by. The characters were so well portrayed and varied, and many of them were lovable and understandable, even when they were enemies of each other. Auraya was an excellent protagonist; she is so smart, talented and strong whilst still being ordinary enough to be relatable. I really enjoyed the way this series progressed from good guys vs bad guys black and white style, through hints that all may not be as it seems to the end where the whole original roles are erased. I did guess some of the twists for the ending, I don't think the author needed to foreshadow them quite so much as it would have made the revelation that bit more thrilling. I would love it if a later sequel was written so I could have a peek at their later lives, especially all the Wilds.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Duffy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. finally!!! after more than I year, I have finally acquired a copy of the book. and as expected... I LOVED IT! I am now officially TRUDI CANAVAN's fan. Ever since I started reading her black magician's trilogy.. i have been looking forward for more... i wasn't disappointed. The Age of Five trilogy was one of the best books/series that I have read. It has me mesmerized from start to finish. I fell in love with the main character Auraya and Mirar... althought I would have thought that Trudi will make finally!!! after more than I year, I have finally acquired a copy of the book. and as expected... I LOVED IT! I am now officially TRUDI CANAVAN's fan. Ever since I started reading her black magician's trilogy.. i have been looking forward for more... i wasn't disappointed. The Age of Five trilogy was one of the best books/series that I have read. It has me mesmerized from start to finish. I fell in love with the main character Auraya and Mirar... althought I would have thought that Trudi will make the epilogue more about them, it wasn't. The plot was great. It has me reading all day just to finish it. I love the way the gods were played in dual role (altho I believe it was hinted on the 2nd book already... or I have my doubts that they are one)... it was one that worked around political, social and personal lives. It may have been dated on an older era and fantasy, but looking at it deeply, it is how our current world is played. I love it. For those who wanted fantasy series, this one is a must.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elen-Hâf

    I enjoyed the first book in this series and the second book was pretty good, but this book was a little bit of a let down. I did enjoy it at the beginning, but towards the end I just had enough. I could see what was going to happen about 150 p.g before it even happened and I got frustrated at the main characters for not getting it too. I do wish that the story carried on just a little more at the end since it's been 50 years since the events happened. Just so that we know what happens with all t I enjoyed the first book in this series and the second book was pretty good, but this book was a little bit of a let down. I did enjoy it at the beginning, but towards the end I just had enough. I could see what was going to happen about 150 p.g before it even happened and I got frustrated at the main characters for not getting it too. I do wish that the story carried on just a little more at the end since it's been 50 years since the events happened. Just so that we know what happens with all the characters. I feel like the book was just a little bit of a let down just because of the ending. This however has not discouraged me from reading other Trudi Canavan books.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robert Kirwan

    This has always been one of my absolute favourite series and books. It’s definitely still a favourite but it does pale in comparison to some other more recent fantasy world. In its own right though, this is still and epic and exciting take that really takes off early and keeps going!! This rounds out the story very nicely and wraps it up while leaving it open for a possible further series. It’s always been my opinion that this is one of Canavan’s best works and her writing really flourishes in t This has always been one of my absolute favourite series and books. It’s definitely still a favourite but it does pale in comparison to some other more recent fantasy world. In its own right though, this is still and epic and exciting take that really takes off early and keeps going!! This rounds out the story very nicely and wraps it up while leaving it open for a possible further series. It’s always been my opinion that this is one of Canavan’s best works and her writing really flourishes in this series!! I always hunger for more but whether it will come or not remains to be seen!!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tommye (The Fantasy Review)

    View the full review at The Fantasy Review It’s difficult to review the final book in a trilogy without giving away any spoilers, so I will do my best to summarize! Trudi Canavan ties up the loose ends of The Age of Five Trilogy in Voice of The Gods. All the secrets and mysteries that have been hinted at and explored in the previous two entries finally come together. Some are satisfying, others aren’t quite what I was expecting... View the full review at The Fantasy Review It’s difficult to review the final book in a trilogy without giving away any spoilers, so I will do my best to summarize! Trudi Canavan ties up the loose ends of The Age of Five Trilogy in Voice of The Gods. All the secrets and mysteries that have been hinted at and explored in the previous two entries finally come together. Some are satisfying, others aren’t quite what I was expecting...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marzouq

    The conclusion of the trilogy is surprising and satisfying. That is why I like this series, there is a satisfying ending which leaves you like a full meal but you like it so much you still want more. Trudi knows how to make her trilogies, I just hope she comes out with new ones soon.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dune Elliot

    I enjoyed the entire 'Age of Five' trilogy but found that this final installment was a tad too predictable; I could see the end coming at the end of Book 2. I did enjoy this book but would like to see more stories about 'The Wilds', they are what make the books more intriguing. I enjoyed the entire 'Age of Five' trilogy but found that this final installment was a tad too predictable; I could see the end coming at the end of Book 2. I did enjoy this book but would like to see more stories about 'The Wilds', they are what make the books more intriguing.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hassaan

    Been years and years since I read this, but I still remember the big reveal at the end. It was brilliant, well executed, and brought a whole different meaning to the interactions characters had had since book #1

  25. 5 out of 5

    Assia

    Finally i've finished it. Basically the same complaints that I had with the other two books. Majority of characters were boring and the story was so so slow and the ending was so abrupt. The magician trilogy is better. Also not the best fantasy out there but much nicer to read. Finally i've finished it. Basically the same complaints that I had with the other two books. Majority of characters were boring and the story was so so slow and the ending was so abrupt. The magician trilogy is better. Also not the best fantasy out there but much nicer to read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    MJ

    WOW what a story! I loved this last book of the trilogy, although the last 3 pages I was a bit hmmmm naaaww. I found myself swept up in all the characters. The good the bad and the downright evil. Filled with hope, laughter , tears , agony and wonder. A definite must read!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sky

    A really good conclusion to my now favourite trilogy. I did enjoy the second book more but this was still an excellent read. I've picked up another of Canavan's books from the library because I love her writing. A really good conclusion to my now favourite trilogy. I did enjoy the second book more but this was still an excellent read. I've picked up another of Canavan's books from the library because I love her writing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Arinamidalem

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Luv the ending..Auraya and the dreamweaver plus other wilds were able to capture the gods and cornered them in a void before finally the gods destroy themselves ...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicola

    at the start it felt like it was another 'why am i bothering' book however at the end i was really glad i kept reading. there was a point to the story line ! nicely written at the start it felt like it was another 'why am i bothering' book however at the end i was really glad i kept reading. there was a point to the story line ! nicely written

  30. 4 out of 5

    James Palmer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. found going through this book was an absolute blast going through all of the intricacies of Ithania. I found the overall concept of how magic works in this world very interesting and the ability to make someone who is gifted enough immortal felt very believable. i found Auraya an interesting character throughout the series. Her loyalty to the white is believable and the guilt that she has of the consequences of her actions is believable as well. Her love of the Siyee is also interlinked with her found going through this book was an absolute blast going through all of the intricacies of Ithania. I found the overall concept of how magic works in this world very interesting and the ability to make someone who is gifted enough immortal felt very believable. i found Auraya an interesting character throughout the series. Her loyalty to the white is believable and the guilt that she has of the consequences of her actions is believable as well. Her love of the Siyee is also interlinked with her ability fly and the cruelty of the gods is displayed through the harming of the Siyee knowing Auraya's love for them. Her dreams of the battle was nice to have for Auraya to have on the whole but it ultimately was pointless as it never was brought up again. Her difficulty of learning how to hide her mind was needed because it made her seem more real because otherwise it would seem she was just able to learn anything instantly which would of been boring. Her compassion is what gets her into trouble with the Gods and then trapped by Nekuan. I didn't like how she had forgiven Chaia for basically murdering thousands of people, Including Siyee, all for the sake of a game . however it could be under the charm he has over women still affecting her so it is not completely unexplained. Mischief was always funny in his speaking and actions and was always cute. For him to then bring Auraya the key to her shackles was a funny and awesome moment. His worry for Auraya when she learns how to hide her mind is impeccable attention to detail and makes it seem that her learning of magic from the Wilds have concequences. I enjoyed Mirar's character from the first book with his snide comments on Leiard's actions to his relationship with emerahl and internal conflict within a singular body. the reveal of Mirar as the owner of the body was a very well handled reveal that was not expected by me. Mirar's dedication to those in need is his weak point as he reveals himself to the gods when teaching Auraya an advanced healing technique to heal more Siyee. He can see the flaws in many aspects of things from the Circlian religion to Auraya's compassion. His planning to free Auraya to only be freed by a veez is hilarious. towards the end of the book you can feel the didication he has to auraya. The little spats between him and Emerahl is always funny. Emerahl has always been a good perspective to read from as her experience in the world has made her observant of the world and is able to give the reader a view of what ithania is like through her roaming. Her lack of humility and paranoia from being immortal is very believable. through her we see the funny bickering between the twins and the mysterious nature of the gull. her quest was satisfying to read through but i did find her realisation of what she was meant to do with the obvious riddle did maker feel more stupid than she deserves to be painted as. Her humour did defiantly charm me and it was always fun reading through her. Danjin was an interesting character in the first book as an adviser but was boring in comparison to what was happening in the third book but this was not fault of his character. The circlians dealing with the Pentadrians trying to covert those in dunway. While this did demonstrate the ruthlessness of ellareen it did feel like it did not contribute to the ending. all it did contribute is ellareen not believing that Auraya is lying and thus attacks her. It would be a lot more satisfying if Ellareen to spark conflict between the two armies. Danjin at the felt like a character that goes with whatever influence is near him which doesn't make sense because he would end up a trader with his dad. so if he isn't, why did he think that Auraya had betrayed him without questioning why she did her actions. The ending was far too short for what it needed to be longer or show conflict between peoples to feel satisfying. we don't get any insight on what happened to the main character in the epilogue when it clearly set it up to be. I think the two people that should have attacked auraya out of rage would be Rian and Ellareen as they seem very fanatical with their religion. to have someone who betrayed the white and then side with what the consider abominations without consequences seems very unrealistic.The reaveal was decently predictable by book two and that doesn't help that almost nothing massive happens. the unexpected part was Chaia killing himself and the other Gods because he simply hates Huan which is fair enough. The The epilogue makes the Maker religion somewhat relevant by having the preacher visit the Sennon Emperor. We get no aspect of the turmoil or lack of turmoil in ithania having the Gods dead. what i think happened was that both southern and norther Ithania split into a power struggle due to the split in religion and Sennon did not have any of these problems because they were neutral in a religious aspect so they were able to expand. We see nothing of the realationship between any of the wilds, voices or white. we don't see the reunion with the twins,Gull,Eamerahl,Mirar and Auraya. Does auraya get a nickname like the eagle or something to that affect? we don't know. This leaves an empty feeling for me and it is really disappointing. What happens to the Siyee or Elai. do they carve out thier own empires or remain the way that they are?

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